Triace pistols.

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by Len Mott, Aug 5, 2016.

  1. Len Mott

    Len Mott Member

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    Hello everyone, I own a Triace duo .22 & .32. and have been shooting both a long time to my great satisfaction. Started shooting with my father in UK in the 1950's and still attend a club and shoot once or twice a week. I am thus an ex-pat brit. whose been living in holland since the late 70's. Gun rules here were always strict but are now even stricter to the point where in order to keep your guns you must take part in a certain number of competitions per year. Found this forum in a bit of a panic when the hammer lip broke of. No spares here and if I can't get a new hammer quickly cannot complete the competitions. Is there anyone out there who can put me in touch with a spares source. It is nice to see there are still other people who are fans of the Triace.

     

  2. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    Maybe if you can't find the part a gunsmith could make a new one?
     
  3. Len Mott

    Len Mott Member

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    I've been busy today to try and find one willing and able to do that. Unfortunately here in Holland real gunsmiths are very thin on the ground. There has been decades of indoctrination against firearms here accompanied by draconian laws, rules and regulations about ownership and use, as an American you would not believe it!
     
  4. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    My sympathies on the laws and regulations issue to the extent that it presents additional obstacles to the legitimate pursuit of a simple part.

    Okay, let's say we fabricate. Can you just let anybody with a CNC machine help you out, or would you get your door kicked in for even thinking about it? If I were desperate--which by the way I think I would be considering the scarcity of the part--I'd be thinking "could I just file one out of a piece of bar stock? Or, can I get a piece welded on to mine and shape it myself?

    I've never seen a Triace in real life. I seem to recall that the Blue Book of Gun Values mentions that only a couple hundred were ever imported into the US.

    LATER: Okay, I checked the parts diagram. The hammer does not look like it would be a very difficult part to make. It's just the fitting that would worry me. Safety issues and all in a public competition. Gunsmith job.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2016
  5. Len Mott

    Len Mott Member

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    Thank you for your sympathy. I just tried to upload a pair of photos but I can't see if that has worked. It is a small 20mm steel triangle 7mm thick. It has a semi circular groove taken out of one side for a spring piston to fit into, a spindle hole in one corner and a small lip on another. 2 thirds of one side is the contact area for the firingpin. The lip is the contact point for the sear and is broken off. The item has been made extremely hard. It would br very tricky to make with a file.
    I hope the contact I made today can help. He thought he could fabricate the hammer itself and knew another person who he thought could harden it.
    The history of the Triace that I was told was that they decided to do what NSU did in the 1950's in the motorcycle world championship series. NSU announced that they were going to start racing, they were going to win the world championship just to show everybody they could. And then stop after all it's a very expensive business.
    They were as good as their word. They entered the 250cc class in 1953 and won and the entered the 250 and 125cc classaes in 1954 and won they then retired from racing.
    Sako, so I was told, was a rifle making company who consdered they were the best. They also made a small number of pistols.They decided to make a set of pistols for people specifically to take part in the Olympics with and make it so good they would win with them. They called the set The Triace. It consisted of one pistol body and three barrel and slide sets for .32, .22 long rifle and a .22 short ( for Olympic quick fire) calibres.
    This was put into a leatherette case with two magazines for each calibre, a cleaning rod, a complete tool set and a comprehensive handbook. They succeeded in going to the very top in olympic competition but did not make or sell many of the sets. A significant number of clients made it known that they did not require the .22 short barrell, so some sets were sold as pairs in three barrell cases and some in two barrell cases. They were of course painfully expensive. I have one of the two barrell in a three barrell case sets. Up till now the only trouble I had with it was a weak firingpin spring which was fixed with a piece if generic repair spring from a gun shop. It fits, me personally perfectly, and has, without extra weights, a good solid feel and balance. It has given me many years of enjoyment. It would be possible to buy another set here but it would cost at least 750 euro. As someone well past the age of retirement that is very expensive. Thank you for your interest what do you shoot yourself?
     
  6. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    I got to thinking that if it was me I'd be asking fellow competitors. Somebody will know something helpful.

    Smith & Wesson Model 41, baby. Maybe not a full-out Olympic pistol, but I have nothing that will beat it. I did have a 1936 Walther Olympia--which could not beat the 41. I also shoot a Colt .22 Officers Model Match. Nice, but it came it third out of the three.

    I've never shot competition. More like up at the cabin.

    Best of luck on your quest.
     
  7. Len Mott

    Len Mott Member

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  8. Len Mott

    Len Mott Member

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    Asking round was the first thing I did, only one man had a Triace, had had no problems yet and so had never needed to look for spares. I'll just have to see what we can make of a bit of self manufacturing. Your Model 41 is just about the best there is of the high build models. Which I believe was made to beat the Walther Olympic type models. Was yours a Hammerli one or an original Walther? The Colt officers model is also a very good gun but as you've found out the pistols out perform the revolvers as regards accuracy. It would be nice to have a little more freedom here with the number of guns you may hold. At the moment you are not allowed to have more than five weapons. For me that is the Triace, a Tanfoglio 9mm Match, an Anschutz 1913 rifle, an Erma ER1 carbine and a Ruger 10/22 carbine. There are people with cabins in the country for holidays but if you started plinking there you would swiftly see the inside of a prison cell. There is a limited amount of hunting allowed but as with everything it is very tightly regulated. Enjoy your shooting.
     
  9. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    My Walther was the old original one. Heck of a gun, but I did sell it after some years. A collector gun rather than a shooter, I suppose. I did really put it through its paces while on vacation (up at the cabin) against the 41 and the OMM when I first bought it. That was fun. Results were 1,2,3 and 1,2,3 Model 41, Olympia, OMM at 15 yards offhand and 25 yards off a rest. No surprise there, huh?

    I did know about the connection between the Walther and the 41, at least in general terms. Same basic action and all. The 41 is a workhorse. Ideal for me when I want to use it as a benchmark for shooting other pistols at the same time.

    Sounds like you really know your target guns. I don't. Just some basics and maybe not all of those.

    Interesting what you said about getting in big trouble for plinking. Sometimes I have to remind myself that this is an international forum. For example, suppressors just did get legalized here in Minnesota last year.

    I read that in Japan you go to prison for even picking up a handgun--say if you should find it somewhere. But, I also read that there were something like four--yes four firearms homicides in the entire country last year. The City of Chicago gets about that many a day.
     
  10. blackjack

    blackjack Well-Known Member

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    Hello Sako Folk,

    Is it not amazing to think that the Browning/Miroku factory in Japan make some of the finest guns & rifles in the World, and yet the citizens of Japan have to endure draconian firearms law! I own a 20 bore Browning Model 325 O/U made in 1993 with 30 inch fixed choke barrels, and I can not find any imperfections in that gun. The feel, balance and overall quality are second to none! I also own a 28 bore Browning O/U Citori and again I can not fault that gun. I thought that our firearms law in Gt. Britain were far to strict until I read Len Mott's account of firearms law in Holland! Wow!

    Blackjack
     
  11. P04R

    P04R Well-Known Member

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    Hello Len. I bet Sako has all the hammers you could ever want. Have you asked them? Importing the parts should be easy inside EU.
     
  12. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    :p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p:p That's a good one!
    Unfortunately, the current iteration of Sako (now owned by Beretta and combined with Tikka) doesn't attempt to support the out-of-production models built by the original Sako company. The upper management seems to believe that even acknowledging the older models somehow works against the sales of their current models.
     
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  13. Len Mott

    Len Mott Member

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    You've got it in one stonecreek, unfortunately. The hammer is made to extremely close tolerances, from good metal and expertly hardened. I hope to have found the answer in two people, one who has the machinery to make the part and another who as part of his job hardens metal for various uses. Of course the consequences for getting it wrong vary from it not working to losing a finger or two.
    As regards the regs. in England they are even worse than here for pistol shooters because they are completely banned even the Olympic team, I have heard, would have to go France or somewhere to be able to practice with real guns instead of airpistols. A long while ago, when I still lived and shot in england, British .303 ammunition had dried up as had new barrels. The people I shot with always took part in "Service Rifle, as issued" competitions. When the goverment contemplated the logical change to using 7.62 SLR rifles there was years of wrangling. they did not like the idea of a semi-automatic being available outside the regular armed forces at all!! Some of the regs. in Holland are far more lax than I understand. We are allowed, for instance, to have 10,000 rounds of ammunition at home!? In England it was 1,000, ie. one box of .22 long rifle.
    Japan has with all crimes an extremely low count compared to the rest of the world.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2016
  14. BobGee

    BobGee Member

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    Hi Len,

    I’m new to the forum and have just acquired my long sought after TriAce.

    I was a little perturbed by your problem of the sear spur breaking off your hammer - a complete disaster for a TriAce or 22-32 owner.

    Did you have any luck with your part maker and hardening expert? Did you get a bunch made?

    Would be good to know.

    Bob
     

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