Sako TRGs TRG-S Long Action/stock question

Discussion in 'Sako TRGs' started by pacecount, Nov 17, 2015.

  1. pacecount

    pacecount Member

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    Question: Does this stock hold up to the recoil of a long action?

    Background:
    I just received a safe queen TRG-S in 270 w a 22" barrel today... Sweet! In the process of researching the rifle I came across a thread that claimed the stocks cracked in heavy long actions at the hand grip between the action and the butt.

    Also, my SAKO Mannlicher stock (L61R 375 H&H) broke at the barrel lugs. This rifle being absolutely awesome... I spent too much money and am waiting on McMillan and Hart Barrels to put my action back together again.


    It may be a mistake but I put a 24" barrel with a McMillan varminter stock on her. I am expecting to get 2850 FPS with a BC of .43 which should be a clean elk killer out to 600+ yds with 2000 FPS and 10.5 minutes of drop at 9500 ft.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2015

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    I own TRG-s Sakos in .338, .375, and .416. While I don't shoot them every morning, and only every-other afternoon, I can't feature the stock breaking at the wrist. At least not as long as the action screws are reasonably tight. Any stock can be damaged if the action screws are loose and allowing the action to wallow around in the stock. I don't think there is any chance of your .270 breaking its own stock.

    Trajectory and energy are not your problems in taking an elk (or anything else) at extended yardage. Your problem is wind, and you won't know until the shot misses (provided there is a backdrop that will show where it hits) which way and how much you should have adjusted your windage. Not that that has much to do with where your windage should be on the next shot with the capricious variability of real world wind.
     
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  3. pacecount

    pacecount Member

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    I greatly appreciate your feedback on the TRG-S stock and am glad to hear from an experienced shooter.

    The .375 was my first exploration out of 308... I found the rifle and cartridge to be highly accurate and decided to go against the grain of conventional wisdom and see if I could turn it into a 600 yard gun. To your point big heavy bullets do not get pushed around, as much, by the wind... I just hope they fly well.

    The purpose for the question on the stock revolves around my next purchase of either a 7mm mag or a 300 win mag.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2015
  4. David_S

    David_S Well-Known Member

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    My M995 stock cracked just where you mention. (It was probably my thread you came across). After careful examination I decided it was more cosmetic than structural, so widened the crack with a dremel, filled it with epoxy and then spray painted it. That was a few years ago now and we have had no more trouble.

    I do not know why it broke but I doubt it was loose action screws in this case as the rifle has always been a tack driver. Our main concern with the rifle (apart from its weight when lugging around the hills) is that the barrel is prone to rust in damp conditions. - David
     
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  5. Madmax

    Madmax Member

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    I have 2 Sakos in M995s, one a 270Win, the other a 30-06 Springfield. The 270 I have had since new in 1996 and while on my 3rd barrel, have had no recoil issues with the stock. I only recently purchased the 30-06 and am still developing loads for her. No recoil issues with either. Amazing hunting rifles.

    Max
     

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