Tikka rimfire

Discussion in 'Valmet and Tikka' started by Cali, Jan 26, 2018.

  1. Cali

    Cali Well-Known Member

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    Tikka is releasing a rimfire version in the spring. MSRP looks like 499.00 from what I’ve read, any thoughts?

     

  2. cl_leg

    cl_leg Well-Known Member

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    let you know after i shoot mine!
     
  3. Lsa-55

    Lsa-55 Member

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    Same here! Is this the first rimfire that Tikka has ever made?
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2018
  4. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    Here's a link from the Shot Show in Vegas.

    https://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/ti...kka-t1x-usurper-rimfire-crown-shot-show-2018/

    The guy in the video is Miikka Tamminen he is the Sako Tikka Product Manager. I spoke with him last year and he said that he was aware of the Sako Collectors Forum and that they wanted to help, contribute to it.
    He gave me his card with his phone number and email address which I did sent him two emails, but never got a reply back.
     
  5. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Looks neat. I'll buy one if they put a walnut stock on it. I've already got lots of .22's, but there's always room for one more, and anything Tikka makes is going to be accurate.
     
  6. fw71

    fw71 Member

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    Only one model. Skohan Tikka. Manufactured 1930-1938 about one thousand weapons and 1952 28. Oy Skoha Ab was gunshop owned by Suojeluskunta (Finnish Civil guard). . Kullervo Leskinen shot a new world record 387 points year 1931 with Skohan Tikka.
     
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  7. fw71

    fw71 Member

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    [​IMG]
    Skohan Tikka
     
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  8. Timothy Yates

    Timothy Yates Active Member

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    The Tikka T1x is highly recommended in both 22 LR and 17 HMR. With its price point, quality and performance I predict it will take over the 22 LR rimfire world in 1 year.

    Unless you just don't like Tikka for some reason or you just have to have wood or are a lefty, there is no reason to buy anything else.
     
  9. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    The new Tikka looks to be a very well-engineered product, similar in many ways to the T3. Rifle Shooter magazine tested one and got 1/2"-3/4" groups at 50 yards, with a gigundo 2.5-10x scope. This is excellent, and comparable to what I get with my CZ 452 in .22LR with a 4x Nikon and my CZ 455 in .22WMR with a 6x Zeiss. These models have been replaced by the new CZ 457. Price of the CZ is comparable to the Tikka, in the $450-550 range depending on options. I have not shot the Tikka, but based on long experience with their centerfire rifles I would expect the action to be a bit smoother than the CZ. The Tikka comes with a threaded barrel, nice if you want to put a suppressor on it but the knurled end cap is kind of ugly if you don't.

    I'm one of those guys who "just has to have wood." I own half a dozen rimfire rifles, all of which have wood stocks except for an old Remington Nylon 66. The CZ rimfires come with nice Turkish walnut and have a number of options for stock style, heavy or light barrel, sights or not, etc. I'm quite happy with my CZ rifles and have no plans to acquire the Tikka. This could change if Tikka decides to market the rimfire with a wood stock. That's not out of the question; according to the magazine review the Tix uses the same stock as the T3x, so it wouldn't be hard for Tikka to add a wood option. What would really be great is a Mannlicher-style full stock, but that is probably a fantasy. My CZ 455 has a Mannlicher-style stock; unfortunately CZ-USA is not listing a full-stock option for the 457. They are almost certainly making one for the European market, so maybe we will see one here one of these days. In the meantime, full-stock 455's can be found, with some effort. The 455 has interchangeable barrels in .22LR, .22WMR, and .17HMR.

    Speaking of accurate .22's, my 1950's Remington 513T shoots as well as or better than either the CZ or the Tikka. 513T's can be found at gun shows at attractive prices.

    Photo of CZ 455 carbine.
    CZ Carbine 1.JPG
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    You might be surprised how out-of-fashion the traditional full stock rifle or carbine is in Europe. I have several European hunting friends who tell me that the current "word" on full stock rifles is that they are inaccurate. One of them was hesitant to hunt with a Sako .308 Mannlicher I offered until they shot it and found a hole square through the center of the bull at 200 yards.

    And if you look at most hunting rifles currently on the European market you'll find all sorts of Buck Rodgers bells and whistles on them. Sadly, current European rifle tastes are trending away from classic features. Just look at the current crop of plastic-and-stainless Sakos for the evidence.
     
  11. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    That's too bad; I thought the European market was still pretty conservative. I don't like all that Captain Zoom Zoom crap on a rifle. Give me a classic design with a deep, polished blue finish and nice figured wood, and make it shoot accurately, and I'm happy. I figured the current trends in plastic-stocked Sako and Tikka were direct responses to the American market. I would note that Sako is making the 85 with Bavarian style stocks in both rifles and carbines, and judging from Gunbroker there are a fair number of them around. I've even seen several carbines for sale in 6.5x55.

    About half of my full-stock rifles and carbines are tack drivers - a Sako AIII in .30-06, an L469 .222 Magnum carbine, and the CZ .22 Magnum in the photo above. The rest are just average - decent for hunting, but nothing to brag about and post targets.
     
  12. Timothy Yates

    Timothy Yates Active Member

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    The full length stock rifles are fine to look at and look nice but I never really warmed up to them.

    The Tikka bean counters were/are smart. They have offered a fantastic platform to build from for a very (IMO) cheap price. The stock for example, yes it is plastic but it's a very nice plastic that's pretty rigid for what it is. I would have never replace one of mine but I'm planning ahead for a larger aftermarket barrel when they come out. But Tikka put this cheap stock on to keep the price point low, knowing most will upgrade the stock no matter what is on the rifle. Same with the bottom (medal), most chassis won't utilize the trigger guard anyway. The heart of the rifle, ( bolt, receiver and trigger) is the core ingredients to build on.

    Tikka T1x #2.

    7-3-19_4.jpg

    Tikka T1x #1 AKA the "Night Stalker".

    0712192110a.jpg

    But, I will always like the all wood and steel of these timeless gems.

    0704192104.jpg

    0216191617b.jpg

    0718191943.jpg
     
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