Tikka Conversion

Discussion in 'Valmet and Tikka' started by Guest, May 8, 2005.

  1. Guest

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    I have a Tikka LSA-55 Deluxe. There are a couple of things that bother me about the rifle. First I hate the magazine set up.

    Is there a way to convert the magazine to a floor plate?

    Second is that I'm not getting the accuracy I want so I'm thinking of rebarreling. I don't want to scrap a Bofor barrel but is it really that big a deal to do so?


    Thanks
     

  2. Guest

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    I can't help with the first issue of the magazine but may be able to help with the accuracy. What caliber is your rifle? Some cartriges are better than others at keeping a tight pattern. A .222 will usually be more accurate than a .270 right out of the box in most rifles. Has your action been bedded and is the barrel free floating? Some times just loosening the action screws and shoving down on the barrel while while the butt is against the floor and re-tightening the screws will make a differance. Just this morning I had to do a little sanding under the barrel of my old L46 as the stock was starting to touch the barrel. Handloaded ammo makes a big differance in some rifles. I can't get better than 2" three shot groups with factory .22 Hornet but with more than one handload can keep 10 shots in a 3/4" pattern. The ammo you are using may have a bullet that is too long to properly stabilize with the rifling twist rate in your gun. I cannot shoot 50gr bullets with my Sako without them turning sideways and making keyhole shaped holes at 100yds.
    I hate to see someone go the the time and expense of a rebarrel and find it didn't help.

    Dan in OH
     
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    It is a 308 win. It's in a Mcmillan stock bedded and free floated. I have only used factory ammo (five different types) in it so far but usually I can find one brand of ammo that will group an inch or less with my other guns. I don't seem to be able to with this rifle. Plus this barrel seems to copper foul more than usual. It's accurate enough to hunt with but I prefer my guns to to better.
    My dilemma is mostly money. Do I spend another 3-400 dollars to put a new barrel on this gun? I could have bought a nice semi-custom for what I have into it. It shoots ok right now but it could shoot excellent with a new barrel. But I still don't like the magazine set up. That would cost me more money to have converted.
     
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    I had a L579? in 308 with a light barrel and it shot almost everything I fed it under 1deg MOA. since you say you have a copper fouling I wonder if that method of firing the polishing bullets would help. I've heard about that process and can't right know recall the proper turn for it. I'd really think the SAKO would not need the treatment as it is usually reserved for american made firearms. The only gun I had problems with copper fouling was a Savage 112 FVS in .220 Swift. Wonder why? I recall hardly ever getting any green/blue patches on my 308 when Sweets 7.62 was used. By the way, I have heard never to leave Sweets in the barrel for more than 5 minutes. Since hearing that I use the Hoppes Benchrest. Much less of the nasty stuff.

    Dan
     
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    I love the magazine set up on mine. Sounds like your barrel is not broken
    in. Time to get the wipe out, brushes, jags and Butches and work on that
    barrel. Shoot the heck out of it and clean every 5 rounds. It'll shoot just
    fine.
    ----- Original Message -----
    From: "mliang128"
     
  6. Guest

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    I wouldn't do anything drastic until I looked at the barrel with a borescope. If it seems rough or has some pitting you can firelap it,etc.
    Did the gun ever shoot well or is it new to you?
    Other suggestions here are all good. Rebarreling is an expensive step. In this part of the world you can get another rifle for the cost of a barrel job.
     
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    I have not borescoped it yet but will before I decide to rebarrel. The gun was bought used so I don't know how it shot before me. I assumed it had not been shot much since the wood and blueing were perfect. No worn spots on the barrel end or anywhere else. There are some scratches on the magazine base.
    There was a lot of cooper build up initially that I cleaned out with Butches Bore Shine. That took several days to do. I have put a hundred rounds through it of various loads since I bought the rifle. It needs to be cleaned, down to the barrel with no copper left, after every 15-20 shots because the accuracy gets much worse after that many shots with no cleaning. I tried lapping it with JB bore paste but there was little change. I might try that again. Looking down the barrel I can't detect any major areas of pitting or rust as everything looks bright and even. Guess the next step is to lap it again and then have it borescoped.
    Any other suggestions are appreaciated. I know Tikkas are supposed to shoot well and can not see this one being any different.
     
  8. Guest

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    Honesty,
    It's just may not be worth the hassle and probably the barrel is ruined
    Sufficient cool down time between shots and periodic range cleaning is a must.
    Why have a Tikka when you can still find vintage Sakos, or my favorite, being an American the pre 64 Mod. 70 Winchester, 99% for around $1400
    Just my opinion,
    I Like the older Sakos and have my share, but the sun don't rise and shine on them like some think.
    Bernie


     
  9. Guest

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    The Tikka with original rings, and a older scopechief scope came out to $500. A little expensive but the wood has figure and tiger stripping throughout, better than most Supergrades or Deluxe that I've seen. Because the stock was so pretty is the reason I decided to get a synthetic. If it was a regular wood stock it would have stayed.
    I know that Tikkas are usually shooters, Bofor did make nice barrels. The action is sized for the 308. It's very light and trim. The rifle pulls up perfectly. In another words, it called my name. And we all know what happens when a gun calls your name.
    I also have a pre-garcia sako in a 338 win mag so I know about the older Sako's. (didn't pay much more for it than I did for the Tikka) I personally never liked the pre war model 70's but they were built nice. I'd rather have a cleaned up modern reproduction or a tricked out Mauser. But to each their own. That is why they make so many styles of guns.
    As for my problem... Someone stated that it might be due to the barrel not being completely clean. Makes since due to the fouling in the barrel to begin with and so little wear. The previous owner might have never cleaned it. So I'll give that a shot and see how it goes. Keep the ideas coming. I might get it to shoot straight sooner or later. Thanks.
     
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    Well, I just got back from the range. I cleaned the gun out until no cooper showed up. I tried Hornady 150gr SST, which is a load it seemed to like. First three shot were ugly. I let the barrel cool and the next two three shot groups settled down into the 1 1/2 inch, which is what it did before. Not a horrible shooting gun but I would prefer it too shoot better. I would sell it but I know I would lose a ton of money on the stock. So I guess I might rebarrel.
     
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    I've had good luck with Hornady 165 (168?) gr. BTHP and Black Hills of about the same wt. Best of luck to you.
     

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