Taking The Newest Members Of The Safe For A Gopher Shoot

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by kirkbridgershooters, Apr 3, 2019.

  1. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    390
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Montana
    I loaded up on Sakos this past weekend and luckily I had a few Zeiss scopes hanging around so I could scope the rifles and see how well they shot. The West German Zeiss Diavari has to be one of the best scopes ever made. I have a bunch on rifles and added 3 more today. All of them shot real well...
    thumbnail_IMG_6064.jpg thumbnail_IMG_6067.jpg thumbnail_IMG_6068.jpg

     

  2. Chris Anderson

    Chris Anderson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    10
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Utah
    Looks fun. Can't wait until our snow goes and the squirrels emerge.
     
  3. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    222
    Likes Received:
    44
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Oregon
    Sage rats and rock chucks are soon to be had in my state. Looks like fun Kirk.
     
  4. sakojim

    sakojim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    28
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Oregon
    Lovely Sako's doing what they do best. Enjoy! The snow is about gone here and the diggers are out so it looks like time to enjoy a little practice myself if I can find the time. Sakojim.
     
  5. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    390
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Montana
    Getting some reloading done, anticipating a bunch of shooting this spring...

    thumbnail_IMG_4046.jpg
     
  6. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    486
    Likes Received:
    117
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Nebraska
    I've reloaded shotgun shell before but never center fire rifle shells. How long does it take you to reload 20 rounds?
     
  7. sakojim

    sakojim Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    175
    Likes Received:
    28
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Oregon
    The longer it takes the better the results. A bit more complicated when compared to shot shells. The results are worth the efforts. Sakojim.
     
  8. Chris Anderson

    Chris Anderson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    10
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Utah
    WAY worth the effort.
     
  9. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    486
    Likes Received:
    117
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Nebraska
    I always thought that it was a tedious job reloading center-fire so I have never messed with it. Like how many grains, and seating height. Also what type of loader, single hand one loader,
    or multi loader. Just easier going to the store and picking it off the shelf.

    I probably should educate myself about reloading.
     
  10. Chris Anderson

    Chris Anderson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    162
    Likes Received:
    10
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Utah
    Yes it's much easier. Reloading for center fire can be tedious but if you want better than 1 to 1 1/2 MOA accuracy it's just about a requirement.

    I'm not enamored with the case prep or testing all the combinations of the various components available for your caliber, but it is very satisfying when you finally zero in on the combination your gun likes and you see the one ragged hole results.

    But then you may be very lucky and find a factory load that will give you the accuracy you're looking for. Then all you have to do is pay (and pray that they don't discontinue that load). ;)
     
  11. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    390
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Montana
    I shoot too much to buy ammunition. It is purely economics. I don’t worry too much about groups, I worry more about shooting stuff, lots of stuff...

    7DB618A1-9644-4B3E-B7FC-C970691E1F08.jpeg
     
    dgeesaman, Rocky, cl_leg and 2 others like this.
  12. blackjack

    blackjack Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    27
    Country Flag:
    UK
    State/Region:
    UK Crest
    I've tried Coors Light, but nothing compares to English Beer! Our oldest Brewery founded in 1698 is" Sheperds & Neame " and is in the county of Kent and is so good to drink and full of flavour! with many different types to choose from.

    Blackjack
     
  13. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    486
    Likes Received:
    117
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Nebraska
    Blackjack, I've had your English brew and it's like drinking Grasshopper spit.

    The same with the coffee overseas. You get a dainty little cup with coffee that is as Black and thick as syrup.

    It would take me a long time to acquire a taste for either.
     
  14. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    676
    Likes Received:
    390
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Montana
    That’s not beer those are Coors lights...
     
    Unclekax likes this.
  15. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    148
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    On the one hand, I am not a big fan of Coors and I almost never drink it. I will take it in preference to Bud, but that is faint praise. However, the very best tasting beer I ever had was a Coors. Many years ago, a bunch of us from the Arizona Mountaineering Club went up to the Sedona area to do a climb on a sandstone pinnacle. We got out early, but the day got hot and we ran out of water on the hike back to the vehicles. There was a cooler of Coors on ice in my old VW van, and the scene when we hit the parking lot was straight out of a beer commercial, whipping open the cooler, grabbing the cans, and sucking them down. I've drunk a lot of beer in my life, and a lot of the brews were better than Coors, but that can of Coors in the Arizona heat after running out of water in the desert was the best beer I ever had in my life. That was 45 years ago and I still remember it in vivid color.
     
    dgeesaman likes this.
  16. dgeesaman

    dgeesaman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    59
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Pennsylvania
    IMHO, if you are the kind of shooter who takes the time/effort to test more than one type/brand of ammo in a rifle to see what it shoots best, you should be reloading.

    If that is beyond your current interest level, then don't bother. I'm not saying it's above you, it's simply taking that kind of thinking to a few (or many!) more level of detail and control. If you don't enjoy experimenting, data, and incrementally working toward a better setup, you probably won't enjoy reloading for accuracy's sake.

    If you do your "real world" shooting offhand, or in hunting situations, shoot factory ammo if it's more convenient. 1/2 or 1/4 MOA accuracy will hardly outperform 1 MOA accuracy.

    Basic reloading for accuracy can involve only a couple of simple variations: powder amount and overall length. The powder type, bullet type, primer brand, brass brand can be based on sensible recommendations or the reloading manual. Unless it's a load-sensitive cartridge (e.g. target cartridges) I can dial in a good load in less than two groups of 25 rounds and I'm still a rookie at reloading. I can reload a set of 25 rounds of 6PPC in less than an hour.
    My steps are:
    - Full length size / neck size / deprime the cases
    - Clean the primer pocket (every 3rd firing, because I'm lazy and it doesn't build up immediately)
    - Prime each case and wipe off the sizing lubricant while it's held securely in the priming tool.
    - Meter and pour out the powder in each case.
    - Seat a bullet at my chosen length. I usually do this while metering powder. If I were reloading for long range, I'd probably need to measure powder in two steps or at least devote complete attention to it.
    This amount of work can get my 6PPC Sakos shooting inside of 1/4" at 100y. To go smaller I'd probably need to go "full benchrest" and double the steps in my reloading process and also sort my cases and bullets. Buy buying high quality Lapua or Norma brass and Berger or Barts bullets, I think I will continue to skip sorting.

    On the other hand, I had the chance to test a few types of factory 222 in a Cooper 21. The cheap Fiocchi shot ragged hole groups at 100y. If I could get that kind of results from most rifles without reloading, I would buy a lot of factory ammo.

    For 6PPC, I've found I need to try a couple of bullets and powders to really make it sing. For 222 I got great results with the first powder and bullet I tried. So for that reason I'd generalize that 222 is easier to tune than 6PPC.

    /Sidetrack. Reloading is great stuff if you're doing it for the right reasons.

    Coors Light is great hot weather beer.

    Reminds me of the first beer I had after 3 weeks in Africa - a fresh Heineken on tap in Amsterdam. It was fantastic.

    David
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2019
  17. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    148
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    I don't know where you were in Africa but I used to live in Kenya and the local beer was excellent. My favorite was Tusker, which is still being made and features an elephant on the label. The story behind the name is that the brewery was founded by two German brothers who were big game hunters. One of them was killed by an elephant, and the surviving brother named a beer after the elephant. Who knows if it's true, but it's a great story.

    Some very good beers are also brewed in South Africa and Namibia. West Africa, not so much. And back in the day, before the Islamists took over, Sudan was the source of what was widely regarded as the world's worst beer. It was called Camel Beer and a camel was molded into the glass of the bottle. The local joke was that Camel Beer was the only beer in the world that had a picture of the factory on the bottle.
     
    dgeesaman likes this.
  18. Unclekax

    Unclekax Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    36
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US New York
    I did not think it was about the beer but the light.
    In my opinion the joys of language are infinite.
     
  19. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

    Messages:
    6,324
    Likes Received:
    577
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Texas
    Namibian beers are brewed to the original German standards. Tafel Lager and Windhoek Draft are popular and both quite palatable. An innkeeper in Namibia told me that he has to order his Christmas beer at least six weeks in advance because the breweries run out that time of year: The holidays fall in the middle of summer and beer is in great demand.
     
    dgeesaman likes this.
  20. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    409
    Likes Received:
    148
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    Another beer that is "brewed to the original standards" is Fiji Bitter, brewed in (no surprise) Fiji. Fiji Bitter was originally identical to Victoria Bitter (VB), an excellent Australian brew. Over time, the Aussie "original" changed its formula, but the Fiji brew has remained unchanged. Unfortunately, due to marketing restrictions imposed by Foster's, the trademark owner, Fiji Bitter is unavailable outside of Fiji. VB used to be marketed in the US, but now it has been superseded by "Foster's Special Bitter" or some such thing. It's brewed in Canada and sold in a tin resembling an original VB tin. Not bad, but no way up to the standard of the original.
     

Share This Page

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Okay More information