Swap an AII Trigger into an AV??

Discussion in 'Sako Long/Magnum Actions' started by ~shootist, Aug 16, 2019.

  1. ~shootist

    ~shootist Member

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    Hi guys and gals. I'm a new member (old shooter) seeking knowledge. Here is my dilemma:

    I'm planning to take my Finnbear AV 338 WM to Africa next year (along with a newish Tikka T3X Lite in 6.5 Creedmoor.) I purchased the 338 AV new in 1987, btw.

    I also have an AII Forrester 243 carbine (purchased new in 1989). It's mostly a safe queen, but great for practice (and has considerable sentimental value).

    In practicing "From the Sticks" over the last 5 months or so, the Tikka and Sako AII are working great. Both have excellent triggers in the 2 Lb range, as do my various other (competition, etc.) rifles.

    Now before you tell me to adjust the AV trigger - I have. Best it will do is about 3.5 pounds (if freshly lubed). Below that and the hammer falls (so to speak) when the bolt is closed.

    I shoot groups on steel (standing with Tripod Sticks) at 325 Yds with the Tikka and the Sako AII that beat the 338 AV at 230 yds. And faster as well. (Satisfactory hits at 325 equates to excellent shot placement at more reasonable hunting distances, IMO.)

    Before I go to pulling things apart, I thought I would check with the experts. Can I do a trigger swap or is that a no-no?


    Failing that - is there a really good gunsmith that can work magic on these triggers. I think the AV trigger probably has a rough spot somewhere.

    Thanks in Advance.
    Joe
     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The problem you are experiencing with your .338 trigger is a fairly common one. Triggers, even good ones like those by Sako, are mass-produced and some triggers simply won't safely adjust to as low a pull as you might desire.

    Yes, the triggers will exchange, as far as fitting the actions. Depending on when the A-II and A-V were made, they could have different triggers -- earlier ones had the original Sako #4 trigger while later ones used what is often called the "Tikka" trigger. The problem is that if you try to put a Tikka trigger on a rifle originally equipped with a #4, the physically larger Tikka will likely require removing some wood from a rifle equipped with a #4.

    Triggers should not be lubed! They are designed to work dry and clean. Lubing attracts dust and grime. The problem with the trigger on your .338 may lie within the internals of the trigger, or could even have to do with the trigger/bolt sear engagement. Messing with triggers is not a job for hobbyists. If you aren't experienced with triggers then leave it to someone who is. Unfortunately, gunsmiths are a dying breed and it is sometimes difficult to locate one who is competent for a particular job.
     
  3. ~shootist

    ~shootist Member

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    Thanks for the reply, stonecreek.

    I previously tried a Timney replacement trigger and it would have worked fine - but the stock would have needed excessive hogging-out to fit. I returned the Timney.

    I'll try flushing off the lube and see how that works, but dry, (from evaporation), it was around 5.5 to 6 pounds. Maybe there was some grit involved, but that's unlikely.

    If I decide to try a trigger swap, I'll report back.
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    I'm hesitant to tell of it since it doesn't make sense, but I had a similar situation a few years ago with two Sakos on which neither of the triggers would adjust to my desired level. Out of frustration I swapped the triggers on the two guns and, Voila!, both adjusted crisply and safely to the desired weight. I can think of one or two rationales for why this might happen, but nothing other than dumb luck really explains it.
     

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