Squaring up a L461

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks for gunsmithing your own Sako' started by Ranger140892, Mar 11, 2020.

  1. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    I milled the bridges true. They were way out. Drilled and tapped, then machined a scope base. And I trued up the recoil lug, which was so rough it would have locked up in the bedding.

    Sako L461 truing I 2.jpg Sako L461 truing II 2.jpg Sako L461 truing III 2.jpg Sako L461 truing IV 2.jpg

     
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  2. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Junk 700 Rem actions, yes this needs to be done. Sako, not known to need it.
    Didn't see that you touched the Sako bolt lugs. Probably didn't need it.
     
  3. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Another L461 action mutilated. If you want a Picatinny rail, buy an AR.
     
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  4. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    Cvcobra1, no I didn't lap the locking lugs. They're making good contact.

    Paul, not that I need your approval, but the L461 was already altered by the previous owner. Rechambered. And I've already got plenty of AR's, you troll.
     
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  5. sraaw

    sraaw Well-Known Member

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    Interesting. I have never met a sako action that needed "squaring up" like a lot of other makers actions benifit from.
     
  6. piper235b

    piper235b Well-Known Member

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    Impressive, I like what you've done and your "thinking outside the box" solution.
    On a 'shooter', who cares what you do; it's your time and money - do what you want!
    I also like how low the rail is, and the milled clearance for the port.

    I've tried Contessa Picatinny rails on L461's, L579's, and Sako 85's and always thought they looked high and 'clunky'.
    Your version looks much better. Well done!

    Cheers
    Piper
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2020
  7. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Just shows you. Give a man a milling machine and stand back!

    rick
     
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  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Just as silk purses can be made from sows ears, so can sows ears be made from . . .
     
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  9. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    Piper, thanks. I've tried the Contessa's and Near bases too. As you said, they're a little obtrusive, but they did work well. I just prefer to machine them myself.

    I finished chambering the barrel last night. Hopefully I'll get it crowned, broke in, and bedded in the stock in the next week. This rifle, and several others are sitting in the shop, waiting for bench testing. A L61R 30-06, a 788 22-250, and two model 70's in 308 Win, and 30 Nosler.
     
  10. cl_leg

    cl_leg Well-Known Member

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    what are you building? or are you leaving it a surprise?
     
  11. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    CL, no surprise. It's a 223 Rem. I broke in the barrel last night, and will probably pull it, and crown, and profile it today. And now that I've got 30 fire formed cases, I'll probably go ahead and load a few tonight.

    I'll probably order a Brown Precision stock for it. I've got one that I really like, on a L46 I built. But for now I'll bed it into the original stock, just so I can bench test it and enjoy the rifle a bit. It's a shame someone already floated the barrel channel and bedded it, because the stock is in really beautiful condition and would otherwise make a good replacement for a collector rifle.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2020
  12. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Curious what twist rate you with went. I know Stone doesn't even like bringing up twist rates but if I'm shooting Hornet size pills I'd stay with the 12-14. If I was going 72 grain plus I'd lean to the 7-8 rate side. All the rage now seems to be going the long high BC bullets for stretching out the range and bucking the wind.
     
  13. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    CV, I'm using a 1-9" barrel. I'll strictly shoot 55 gr bullets out of this rifle. I don't need an ultra fast twist 223 Rem. I've got 22 Hornets, K Hornets, 221 Fireballs, 222 Rems, and 22-250's that are all twisted for specific bullet lengths. This 223 build will fill the gap I've got in the center-fire small bore department.
     
  14. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Original SAAMI specs for the 223 Rem called for a 12 twist. That will stabilize bullets up to 63 grains. A 9 twist is only needed for the 68-70 grainers & is overkill for 55 grain bullets. Just food for thought.
     
  15. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    Yep. A flat base 60 gr lead core bullet will usually stabilize at 223 Rem velocities out of a 1-12" barrel. However, I'll probably be shooting solid copper bullets, which are longer than lead core bullets, and require a little more rpm. But even if I chose to shoot 50 gr lead core varmint bullets, a 1-9" won't over rev the bullet to the point of disintegration, like a 1-7" will. A 1-9" is about dead center for what I need here.
     
  16. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    And NATO had to screw everything up with their 5.56 SAMMI specs. 58,000 psi and 1-7 twist.
     
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  17. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    Yeah, I remember in the early 80's when the 1-7" twist A2 was fielded, and then Colt introduced it commercially. Almost all bulk ammo at that time was M193 or copies (55 gr ball). I wondered why the 1-7" twist. When I joined the Army a few years later, I found out why. The M855 round with 62 gr bullet with steel penetrator needs that twist. And I was especially happy to have 1-7" M4's in Afghanistan, because I had access to 77 gr ammo.

    I'm getting excited about this L461 build. Good timing too, cause at the end of our turkey season here, I'll go to Kansas for more turkey hunting, and use the Sako on coyotes.
     
  18. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    I ask another member on here about his new to him gopher gun, the 223 HB. He commented on using the 40 grain V Max. Yesterday Bulk Ammo had 25 case lots of 1000 round Fiocchi with the 40 grain Hornady V MAX and today they are gone. Great price I could see but I hope guys didn't buy them for their AR's. PD season isn't to far away and I hope that's what they went for. I've had good luck with Fiocchi and was ready to try some again. Can't load for what you could buy them for.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2020
  19. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    I've got some Fiocchi handgun ammo in storage that shoots really well. I'd buy more.

    I like the 40 gr V Max too. I shoot it in one of my 221's. I don't have any experience shooting it at 223 velocities. But I used to shoot 50 gr V Max's out of a 223, and they were very accurate, and held together. However, the rifle was a 222 Rem that had been rechambered to 223 Rem, and had a 1-14" twist. Do you think that 40 gr V Max would maintain integrity out of a 1-9" barrel at over 3600 fps? It'd be interesting to find out!
     
  20. Ranger140892

    Ranger140892 Active Member

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    Update. I bedded it in the original stock over the weekend, and shot it yesterday and today. Purists, please don't have an aneurysm, the stock had already been bedded and floated by the previous owner. I won't keep this stock, because of the healthy amount of right hand cast that Sako put in the stock. It's a little awkward off the left shoulder. I was gonna order a Krieger or Brux blank, but I used a Douglas air gauge barrel I had laying in the shop for a few years.

    The rifle shoots very well. And I love it when the first handload I try, is the last one I try!

    Sako L461, 223 Rem.jpg Sako l461 group.jpg Sako L461 group II.jpg
     

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