Sako Rifles Afield (as intended)

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by Old Hippie, May 26, 2021.

  1. Spaher

    Spaher Well-Known Member

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    Did someone say backstrap? Plain & simple seared Backstrap 1.jpg backstrap 2.jpg backstrap 3.jpg with olive oil, coarse ground pepper & a little Montreal Seasoning....

     
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  2. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Plain and simple! Beautifully cooked!

    This brings to me a sad and somewhat embarrassing realization.
    Year and years ago , it seemed like everyone around me, all had to fry or cook venison all the way thru, well done and then some. Like pork or chicken, over cooking to insure there are no microbial or bacterial contaminates, parasites and such. Usually sliced thin , rolled in flour and fried . It was still delicious but tough as leather. Then there is the canned venison, chunks cooked till fall apart tender and added to dishes or stews , or combined with BBQ sauce on bread or buns. It was probably decades for me before I had my first medium rare cut of venison. I used to butterfly thin cuts of tenderloin and anything else large enough to slice. With the rest going in the grinder for burger. Now , I wrap up my Backstrap whole, cut in thirds usually, and grill or smoke them whole. 150-165 degrees core temp. Delish!!!!

    Hippie
     
  3. Bernie’s Dad

    Bernie’s Dad Well-Known Member

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    Does anybody cook and eat the internal tenderloins in the field? (I saw that on Meat Eater).


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  4. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Absolutely! I get the inner loins (or lions for our dyslexic members) cut out first thing , straight to the frying pan , butter , salt and pepper. For me it’s a ritual meal of success!

    Bloo
     
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  5. Spaher

    Spaher Well-Known Member

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    Bernie's Dad, If you like a little kick to your venison tenderloin try grilling with a sliver of unseeded fresh jalapeno, a tad of red pepper (optional) wrapped in bacon. When the bacon is ready, so is the tenderloin to slice on a corn tortilla with a tad of lime juice, onion and avocado optional also, we call this appetizer treat "Tenderloin Diablos". ( Also works with dove) Tenderloin Diablos.jpg
     
  6. Spaher

    Spaher Well-Known Member

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  7. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Be cautious when using Spaher's recipes! He grew up in South Texas where the only thing hotter than the weather is the food. I think they flavor their iced tea with serrano peppers down there. The dangerous thing is that while the food is hot going in, it can be even hotter going out!:eek:
     
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  8. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Don’t forget the heart! Also part of my ritual of success! Tho it’s not as tasty as the inner loins…has a slight liver-esque flavor. Sautéed onions are the magic combo.
    Mmm…37 days and counting!
     
  9. Unclekax

    Unclekax Well-Known Member

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    Heart and liver for me.
    Straight to the tent and into the cast iron skillet.
     
  10. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    Liver and onions . Always first on the table when the hunt is over. It is best not overcooked.
     
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  11. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    Great shooting! Dandy buck! What caliber on the lions?
     
  12. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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  13. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    My field pix are lacking. I've failed my .17 rem, as it has taken hundreds of vermin, dozens of coyotes, a handful of fox. No pix. This is my ultimate sako pic. AV 7mm RM 4.5x14 x40 Leupold, 173" Wyoming ram.

    Added, I'll likely never enjoy bighorn loin and ultimate rocky mountain oysters again.
     

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  14. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Gowyo, Beautiful Ram!
    Big Horns are ,to me, almost mythical in status. The limited opportunities to hunt them, along with the high elevations and hard to reach places they can be found makes it almost impossible to even imagine myself being there. Same with Rocky Mountain Goat.
    The mountain oysters have alway been where I draw the line. I’m not really a fan of organs or offal and such. I assume the second photo shows the example. I’m kinda surprised at its color and cross section appearance. I was expecting more black and blue coloration due to the rutting actives these rams enjoy! Maybe your trophy was a nomad!
    One practice here with whitetail is to tie or hang the bucks oyster bag and etc up in a tree where you killed it…as a sign post validation for the hunters success in taking a buck deer. I simply leave it with the rest of the gut pile for the bears, coyotes and such. I can’t eat buttered buck nuts nor would I consider that tiny , bread dough flavored , glob of fat behind the eye of an elk! But I also have not faced starvation in the wilderness either..where I’m sure things would have to be looked at very differently.

    Could you give an explanation or description of the flavor one would be in hopes of enjoying?
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2021
  15. Spaher

    Spaher Well-Known Member

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    Gowyo, First of all, congratulations on a great bighorn sheep!
    The buck in the photo with 2 coyotes was taken by a friend at the ranch with the anecdote on being patient for second shot opportunities. The 2 lions were taken with a .416 as I was hunting bigger game on that trip to the area bordering the Gonarezhou National Park which means "the place of elephants".

    As to the 7X57, in the photo, an AV Mannlicher, I acquired it from Sako Source and is original equipment manufacture and earlier discussion was of this rifle. The box was marked accordingly and legit confirmed by Stonecreek and Sako Source. I also am fortunate to have acquired a second 7X57, a L61R Deluxe thanks to Stonecreek's advice from the estate auction from N(?) Dakota. It is OEM in my opinion. Both are now scoped and only the Mannlicher sighted in, although it does not like the Rem ammo and in the process of obtaining reloads to tighten up the grouping. The problem may have been me as we are almost out of the "dog days" (8/24) and the 85-100F heat and gnats are quite distracting on the range, a problem that will be resolved soon. As to the intrigue of how many 7X57's, I cannot confirm other than I know of 2.

    The plan is to use the 7X57's this season for several WT deer each, as well as a .300 H&H I used last year. We are in a management program where we are issued tags/permits for a as many deer as needed, meaning that our harvest is primarily set by our estimate of the number of does and the fawn survival rate. This year the rains were timely and the most for the last five years for fawning cover and expect an 80%-100+% fawn crop when combined with a determination last year to eliminate all (99%) feral hogs and shoot down the coyote populations resulting in less stress and predation for the bucks, cleaner water sources with the projection that our mature animals will be heavier and grow bigger antlers, healthier does and more fawns although the cycle of less deer should result in healthier deer necessitates more harvesting. Our philosophy is the less deer (w/in reason) the bigger and healthier the remaining animals. Attached is our harvest record for 2013-2020(Jan 2021) including hogs and coyotes, although not updated since Feb to give a perspective. Anticipate removing 175-200 does if good fawn survival & 200 bucks, so lots of hunting days so our freezers will be full and able to feed lots of elderly and deserving. The most difficult factor is controlling hunters, meaning having them buy into our management program and worst yet bad marksmanship as we strive for zero errors on what we are looking to remove, i.e., age class/score and type of does with no fawn errors and minimal wounding as if you shoot it, kill it. Harvesting is done primarily by 3 of us. I guess I strayed off topic some but my point being that there will be plenty of deer shot with these 3 Sako's on my part with copious amounts of alcohol and cigars in the evening at the campfire. Harvest Records 2013-2020.JPG
     
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  16. Bucktote

    Bucktote Well-Known Member

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    Hi fellow Sako shooters,
    One part of a whitetail that many of my local friends discard is the neck. My Wife is not a meat eater as such. My boys would often say " dad mom is hiding the venison chunks behind the potatoes!! Back to the neck, I like to boil it, pull the meat from the bone & then put it in a crock pot with BBQ sauce & serve with baked beans, onions & buns. And the beverage of your choice!! My wife didn't know it was Venison.
     
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  17. sakojim

    sakojim Well-Known Member

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    Good idea Bucktote. Or slow boil the neck (well seasoned) until the meat easily comes off the bones completely. Feed the bones to your pets. Cool down the meat in the pot until easy to separate and freeze to make minced lunch-meat. Save the broth for flavor for noodle soup. Or, while still very hot, put a mixture of meat and broth into hot canning jars to seal for use later for vegetable soup or stew. Absolutely delicious and too good to waste. Sakojim.
     
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  18. Bucktote

    Bucktote Well-Known Member

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    WASTE NOT WANT NOT !!!
    B/T
     
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  19. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    You can do the same with the neck in a low, slow smoker. Wrap it in butchers paper and foil for the last 2-3 hours to hold moisture, then rest it until it cools enough to debone. Killer BBQ!
     
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  20. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    Thanks guys. I applied for @35 years, and I had 24 preference points. I have to wait five years before I can start applying again, (so 3 more!) At 59, it ain't happening. Bloo, I grew up helping ranchers at docking and branding. Lamb fries, calf fries, RM oysters are a delicacy. This ram was no different. After peeling the capsule, you are left with what you see. Dredged in peppered flour and fried in butter, man! What a treat. Oysters you get in a restaurant have been frozen and usually deep fried to the texture of boot leather. These were mild in flavor. They have an even, tender texture, there is no muscle grain. Same as the meat, mild sweet flavor, no similarity to mutton at all, thank god! My first wife came from a sheep operation family and loved it. No thank you! Spaher, thanks for closing that loop and congrats! The front sight hood set me up! Had you not replaced it, I might have thought same gun...here are a couple other pics. Thru the spotter a half mile away while I closed the distance and my smiling face!
     

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