Sako AII Trigger Options?

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by Matt in Virginia, Mar 27, 2016.

  1. Matt in Virginia

    Matt in Virginia Member

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    Gentlemen,
    I have a beautiful Sako AII, Serial Number 341,0XX, that I would like to put a better trigger on. I'm afraid I've become too used to my Bix'n Andys... :) That said I don't know if the AII which is so often mentioned in the same breath with the L579 will accommodate the Bix'n Andy L461, L579, etc Trigger. I know about the Timney A series triggers, having once installed one on my older brother's AI .222 Remington Deluxe, however, they are NOT a Bix'n Andy. I would be GREATLY appreciative at this trigger is too expensive to buy and try. I don't know if they would take it back...

    vertebrae.no/gun-parts/triggers/bix-n-andy.html


    Will have to ask the guys at Bullet Central the US Importers as well. I hope it fits as the action is a work of art...

    Regards, Matt.
     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The labeling on the website is confusing since the L491 and L579 are from a totally different series of Sako actions. However, if the illustration of the trigger is accurate, then no, it will not fit an A-II. The Bix'n Andy trigger for an M98 Mauser will fit an A-II, but the one they sell has no safety (it's designed for a rifle with a bolt safety) so your rifle would be without a safety if you used it.

    Have you tried adjusting your factory Sako trigger? It is generally one of the best in the world offered on a hunting rifle and will usually adjust down to ~2 pounds or so safely, although a few recalcitrant Sako triggers won't cooperate and go that low.
     
  3. Matt in Virginia

    Matt in Virginia Member

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    Stone creek,
    I have adjusted the trigger a bit. Just can't get it to where I want to go... I'm a school trained Gunsmith(not that that says much), Colorado School of Trades 2005-2007', however, I've gotten use to triggers which are often better probably for bench use. That said I admire the precision they offer... Shot placement is a semi religious commitment on my part and superb triggers, and fast lock times, seem to help with that... I GREATLY respect and appreciate your input.

    Oddly enough I had thought about having Ed Labour put one of his three position safeties on this rifle and on an AI in .222 Remington as well. That would mesh well with the 98 Safety. Would have never occurred to me.

    How did you come by that piece of information if you don't mind me asking?

    Best Regards, Matt Garrett
    Chesapeake, Virginia
    757-581-6270
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sako designed their #4 trigger to mount identically to that of the 98 Mauser. Sako sold that trigger to FN to use on their actions, and FN in turn sold actions to Sako on which Sako built their long cartridge guns prior to the introduction of their own long action (L61R) in 1961. I've mounted Sako triggers on several Mausers or Mauser clones, even including a Zastava Mini Mark X action. Except for removing the safety the Sako triggers require no modification to mount on Mausers.

    As a trained gunsmith you might want to go into the internals of your Sako trigger (something that as an amateur I'm hesitant to do myself). The internal contact points can be delicately honed to bring the pull weight down somewhat. However, there is always a limit to any design no matter how precisely it is constructed, so the Sako trigger might not ultimately be able to meet your goals.
     
  5. Matt in Virginia

    Matt in Virginia Member

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    stonecreek,
    Fascinating... Thank you for sharing the history behind the design. That is one thing you can't find from an exploded view in a parts diagram. Your knowledge needs to be posted as a sticky for posterity's sake.

    Trigger design and modification can be a VERY involved process. You have to be careful that you are only "enhancing" and NOT "modifying" said surfaces as you begin to chase tolerance. There can also be unforeseen consequences to even modest trigger modifications that leads me to stay within the bounds that the factory intended. Granted we certainly CAN go lower, however, this CAN also lead to a chain of unintended consequences unless you know the trigger geometry cold. Hence I err on the side of caution and do not take triggers into ranges of pull weights where they were not intended to go by the factory. That makes me a real stick in the mud I know, however, I look at the design of these rifles and see the true genius of those whom designed them... I try to respect their work by doing nothing other than making things square, straight, and true. Granted this was their desire at the time if not a possibility with the machine and time constraints...

    I just looked at a Kepplinger Austrian Mauser 98 two stage Match Trigger against the AII, which is a little deep for this little action, however, you are so very correct that the design is a variation on the same theme. I love 98s as well, however, there is so much work to put them into shape that I prefer buying modern GERMAN 98 Mauser Copies from one of the modern manufacturers such as Prechtl or FZH(Feinmechanische Zerspanungs GmbH). That said I think the little Sako AI and AII, and their predecessors, are a ton of rifle for the money. How many rifles would you build a full custom rifle on without even entertaining the thought of replacement bottom metal? I have been known for my attention of detail on metal preparation of Model 70s, often times taking 24 plus man hours to properly correct lines with files, blocks and emory cloth, and yet I look at this Factory Sako AII and wonder/worry if I could do it justice... They are almost TOO NICE to build a custom rifle on.

    Best Regards, Matt.
     
  6. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    I certainly agree with you on messing with the internals of a trigger, which is why, as I said, I don't do it. And a professional should only do it when he knows exactly what he is doing. I know of some gunsmiths who will work on one make of trigger but not another. This is not because one trigger is necessarily easier or or better adapted to work on, but because the gunsmith has experience, and therefore confidence, with one and not the other.

    You can take a bit more license with the trigger of a 30-pound dedicated bench gun than with a hunting rifle. Although you certainly don't want an unintended firing of a bench gun, the muzzle is always pointed downrange when a cartridge is placed in the chamber and the bolt is gently pushed forward and into battery, thus creating much less chance of a mishap than potentially occurs with a hunting rifle. On the other hand, a hunting rifle may be pointed any direction and the bolt worked feverishly. The trigger on a hunting rifle simply cannot be subject to failure to catch and hold the bolt sear, no matter how vigorously the bolt is slammed home or what position the rifle is in.

    I have a non-Sako on which I mounted a Sako trigger. The stock inletting needed to be modified in order for the safety lever to have proper clearance, so I removed the safety in order to fit the trigger and assure it worked properly before doing the inletting modification. Once I had mounted the trigger and found its pull and function to be excellent, it dawned on me that this particular rifle is only used at the bench or for stationary shooting at colony varmints. In either of these applications it seems better to me to keep the chamber empty (or keep the bolt raised) when not aiming at a target, rather than to engage the safety on a loaded chamber. So I left the safety off and haven't regretted it for a moment.
     
  7. 71Scamp

    71Scamp Member

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  8. 71Scamp

    71Scamp Member

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    Last edited: Mar 25, 2017
  9. mw999

    mw999 Member

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    Long action sako AV, I have an externally adjustable target trigger from the 80s. Does anyone have knowledge if this will fit into the long action? and I am talking about the A series actions from the 80s
     
  10. deersako

    deersako Well-Known Member

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    It will fit but you may have trouble adjusting it properly as the engagement surface on the cocking piece is different.

    Standard is top, target bottom.


    0F8652BB-32B0-4A09-A311-EC672B5D11D5.jpeg
     
  11. mw999

    mw999 Member

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    Deersako, wow, could not have asked for a better answer. Interesting and thank you. MW
     
  12. 71Scamp

    71Scamp Member

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    mw999

    Any chance that you can post a pdf of that illustration? MUCH appreciated!

    Scamp
     

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