Sako 9.3x62mm

Discussion in 'Show us your Sako' started by icebear, Apr 1, 2020.

  1. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    The subject of Sakos in 9.3x62 has come up on a couple of threads, so I thought it was time to post mine. This is an AV sporter with a European style rear sight (Most AV rifles exported to the US had Williams sights if they had sights at all; the front sight on this one does appear to be from Williams). I believe it is a bringback, as it has no importer stampings. Barrel is 24". The scope is a Leupold VXIII 1.5-5x in Sako low mounts (one of the few times I've ever been able to use Sako low mounts). I got the rifle from a close friend back in Virginia somewhere around 2001-2003. He had this one and a Mannlicher carbine in the same caliber and took some time deciding which he would sell to me. Unfortunately for me, he was as big a fan of the carbines as I am and decided to keep the Mannlicher.

    The stock has pretty nice wood, but the factory finish is problematical. I can run my fingers over it and feel the uneven surface. Either it was never sanded out properly, or the finish did not fully seal the surface and the drying process has resulted in a wavy surface. I can even see sanding marks here and there that look like about 100-150 grit. Pretty lame. I'd sort of like to refinish it in tung oil but I've got a lot of more interesting projects ahead of it in the queue.

    I haven't shot it in years, but as best I recall accuracy was about 1.5 MOA with 286 grain Norma factory ammo. That's plenty for any animal you're going to be shooting with a caliber intended for big game at short to medium range. The 9,3x62, designed by Otto Bock, was introduced before WWI as an African cartridge for all but the biggest game. It is based on the .30-06 case and therefore can be compared to the .35 Whelen, but the Europeans load it to higher pressures than the Whelen and the hottest factory loadings are at the lower end of the .375 H&H range. Bullet diameter is 0.366", just halfway between the .35 (0.358") and the .375. The cartridge was very popular among European and South African hunters for game such as lion, waterbuck, and eland. Recoil is stiff, but still surprisingly mild for its capabilities. Mine is not unpleasant to shoot, even though the recoil pad has hardened to the consistency of a brick. However, at least it hasn't flattened out, as is the case with so many early L61R's (unfortunately including my .300 H&H).

    Here are the photos.

    AV-1.JPG AV-2.JPG AV-3.JPG AV-4.JPG AV-5.JPG AV-6.JPG AV-7.JPG

     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2020

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    No sense in trying to refinish it. Better to send it to me & spend your time on your current projects. I could squeeze it in my safe & relieve the overcrowding in yours!
     
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  3. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    :D
     
  4. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    I've run into three 9.3's over the past few years, posted about them. An AV in a shop in Laramie that a gent from Alberta bought, 1900.00+ fees, I found an AIV Safari grade in CO that the GS proprietor jacked me around on. And latest was an L691 fullstock that I hemmed and hawked on too long. (Not usually an issue with me, rookie mistake!)
     
  5. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    I'd have been all over that one, assuming the price wasn't somewhere in the Andromeda Galaxy.
     
  6. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    How about another somewhat hard to find metric, the 7x64? I chased one overnight and about 150 miles to an auction only to have the winning high bid hit my pre-set maximum by an earlier bidder. But luck was with me and just a few weeks later I came across what turned out to be an unfired A-V on an auction that I got for several hundred less than I had been willing to pay on the first one.

    I already had an A-V in .280 and thought it would be interesting to compare them. The .280 happens to be a little more accurate, but that's luck of the draw. In terms of powder and velocity it's hard to tell any difference.
     
  7. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    It was @ 1650, IIRC.
     
  8. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    I have a German custom rifle in 7x64, which I have posted on this forum. It is quite accurate with the right ammunition (Europeans generally load 7mm rifles with heavier bullets than we do). I was the losing bidder in a recent Gunbroker auction for a Sako Mannlicher-style carbine that went for well over $3,000. Just couldn't justify going any higher, although I wanted the gun rather badly. The same seller auctioned an AV sporter in 7x64 for quite a bit less, but I decided to pass. Saw another one on GB a year or so ago, but it was in lousy condition. I'd certainly be interested if another one came along, especially a carbine.

    Performance of 7x64, .280, and .270 is all but identical. The 7x64 has slightly less powder capacity because of the tapered case, but the difference is insignificant, especially as the Europeans typically load to higher pressures than do American ammunition makers.

    JPS 2.JPG
     
  9. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Reasonable for a carbine. An L691 is maybe a bit less desirable than an AV, but I'd pay that in a heartbeat.
     
  10. cwmech

    cwmech Active Member

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    Try some Norma 232 gr factory loads in it, they are quite comfortable to let off - amazing how much less perceived recoil. Unfortunately,with the insanity
    occuring now, it appears the pipeline has dried up, bullets still available both in Oryx and Vulcan, Nosler 250's also quite comfortable to fire, if you're setup
    to load your own
     
  11. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. I've only shot the 286-grain Norma in my rifle. I have the dies, but due to time pressure from other projects, I'm not reloading these days. I'll keep my eyes open for the 232-grain Norma at a a good price. Somehow I doubt that the current run on ammo has had much effect on non-standard loads for little-known European calibers. Everybody is out of 9mm, .380, .357, .45acp, and .223, but 9.3x62? I have a ton of the 286-grain Norma, acquired a box or two at a time at gun shows and closeout sales. Haven't shot the Sako in years, but since I've had it out of the safe I might just take it out and shoot a box of ammo through it - when the county range reopens.
     

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