Question on 244 owners

Discussion in 'Hand loading your Sako' started by john Gildersleeve, Sep 27, 2021.

  1. john Gildersleeve

    john Gildersleeve Member

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    I have a question on my L579 244 forester heavy barrel 1-12 twist. I believe this was made around 1960 and my grandfather gave this too me after he passed. My question is about reloading. I was using the Hornady comparator tool to measure where the bullet hits the lands of the barrel. I was using a couple of different bullets when doing this because I want to load some for target and varmints and of course big game. Well when I did this my comparator was telling me that in order to get the bullet 0.020 from the barrel lands I would then be way past the over all length of the round to fit in the magazine. This was the case using a 65gr Berger target, 75gr Sierra hollow point and a Hornady 90 ELD-x. With the older guns do you need to stay with using the overall length and then adjust? Do I have an issue with my barrel? It still shoots great so I am a little miffed by this. Something is not jiving with this for me. Any help would be much appreciated.

     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    So what's to be miffed about? And congratulations on owning one of the scarce Sako .244's.

    It is not uncommon for some chamberings to have a bit of space between the cartridge mouth and the leade. I wouldn't worry about it. I have handloaded for three Sako .244's (on which the twist is about 11.25" as close as I can measure) and have found them to be exceedingly accurate regardless of whether there is a slight jump to reach the lands.

    Like you, I also like to start with the bullet as close to the lands as practical with most rounds, but if you'll just start with loading the .244's seated out as long as the magazine allows you likely won't be disappointed.

    By the way, the only factory ammunition available these days is Remington 100 grain Coreloct. Despite the relatively slow twist I've found this ammunition is both accurate and speedy (over 3100 fps) in my Sako .244's.
     
  3. john Gildersleeve

    john Gildersleeve Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I am just learning to reload so this is fairly new to me. I noticed a huge difference between some of these new ultra low drag bullets and the regular style bullets. The Berger would need to be around 0.110" from the lands with a maximum over all length set at 2.85" from case to tip. I am noticing that this Sako will accept a longer overall length than what the loading books call out for at 2.825". With this said I think I can push the over all length farther out. Do you know what the max overall length would be for this gun? I have just been seating bullets in an empty case to see what will slide in and out without causing issues. Trial and error thing, lol.
    I found a receipt that my grandpa had from 1960 when he bought this gun from a hardware store in Iowa for $120.
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sounds about right. I paid $139 for a Finnbear in 1965.

    The magazine box in the L57/L579 is just a tad over 2.8", so you're close to all that will go at 2.85". Be sure to fill the magazine with cartridges when checking the maximum LOA which will work since a single cartridge can sit in the magazine at a bit of an angle and thus appear to work at a longer length than when the magazine is filled.
     
  5. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    John, do you realize the .244 Rem and the 6MM Rem are identical in every respect. Knowing this, there is still one sub 100 grain factory round available for the 6MM. That is the 95 gr in the Hornady Superformance. I have several boxes of these but have yet to try them out in my .244 so I can't tell you what the accuracy results would be. Just thought I would pass this along for your interest.
    The only difference being that the .244 rounds are loaded for 1-12 twist and the 6MM rounds are loaded for 1-9 twist.
     
  6. john Gildersleeve

    john Gildersleeve Member

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    Hello, yes I have done the research between the differences. I have some Hornady ELD-X 90 gr I am going to try loading at some point. The problem with the 244 there is not alot of information for loading newer style bullets. From what I gather from reading it seems that the 1-12 twist barrel likes a non boat tail bullet better 100 grains and lighter. So I might try a few of these newer ultra low drag bullets and then switch back. I most likely will not use this gun for big game very often but I might want to shoot it for the heck of it from time to time. I currently have maybe 200 cases of the original 244 cases, but I am looking to get some new Hornady 6mm cases.
     
  7. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Select shorter bullets if they are 90 grains or heavier. A 100 grain conventional cup-and-core lead nose bullet will usually stabilize in the Sako .244's. A 100 or heavier, especially with a boat tail, plastic tip, or monometal may not. My go-to bullet in my Sako .244 HB is a Nosler 70 Ballistic Tip or Varmeggedon (and the corresponding Sierra works as well). This is for varmints, of course. If hunting deer a 90 grain cup-and-core of almost any make is a good bet, along with Remington factory 100 Corelocts.
     

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