'Nother Sako, 'Nother Hog

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by stonecreek, Nov 29, 2021.

  1. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    I like to take each of my Sakos hunting (as they richly deserve), so this weekend I selected my GO Wholesale Sako AV .280 Remington to be the lucky one to accompany on the hunt. I load it with a now-obsolete bullet, but one which performs in an outstanding manner, a Nosler Solid Base (lead tipped) 7mm 150 grain. Velocity is a bit over 3,000 fps and accuracy is excellent. The GO .280, one of 500 of a special run, has a 24.4 inch barrel rather than the 23 inch barrel found on most AV .280's, which of course helps the velocity a bit.

    Just like the last hog I took from this same blind about four weeks ago, this one came from across the cotton field angling my direction. I could see that it was likely headed for a corn feeder around 175 yards from me, so I waited patiently as I tracked it with my binocular. As it got closer to the feeder I traded the bino for the rifle and scope, but watched in disappointment as it veered slightly and disappeared behind a sand berm instead of coming to the feeder. However, in just a moment it climbed atop the berm to survey the open field between it and the feeder. The big "Russian-looking" hog stood about 260 yards away, but I had a good rest and not wanting to chance it disappearing again, I sent one of those Noslers over to greet it.

    At the impact of the shot I heard it let out a squeal, then take off in a hard run back across the field it came from. I quickly jacked another shell in the chamber and threw one after the fast-moving pig, but it kicked up dust well behind it. Although the distance and the speed of the hog was making another shot something of a Hail Mary, on the next round I held further ahead and a bit higher -- whop!, and the piggy skids to a stop.

    I got down from my blind, hiked to it, and when I checked it out and found it to be a rather menacing-looking boar which showed very little domestic parentage. Then I used the laser rangefinder to range back to the blind: Four Hundred yards even! Talk about a Hail Mary! Luck had more to do with it than skill, but still, shooting a Sako makes for some shooting "luck" that many other rifles seem to lack.

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    Wayne, Bucktote, waterwolf and 5 others like this.

  2. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Nice rifle, bodacious hog, great shooting. You should have enough pork by now to keep the barbecue going for the next few months!
     
  3. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Nice rifle Stone
    I hunted with an early Remington Mountain Rifle chambered in .280 rem ( 7mm Express) during my “pre-Sako” life. It was actually a very capable gun.
    I’ve seen the GO models here and there , didn’t realize that the run was only 500.
    Nice piggy! Bet he’d have fun in the smoker!

    bloo
     
  4. Bucktote

    Bucktote Well-Known Member

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    Great hunt & Shooting!!
    My friend & hunting mentor said " if you don't take the shot, you have missed already "
    (providing it's a safe shot) Mr. Stonecreek can you tell us how to prepare that bo hog for
    the table as they have a rep for being too rank for table fare???
     
  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Circumstances (weather, location, time of day, etc.) dictated that this one was left in place as coyote bait. However, we've found if a large boar has little "boar smell" about it that the backstraps can be just as good as a 90-pound female. Someone with more experience with pork might be able to tell you how to separate the "good" eaters from the "bad" ones as they lie where shot, but I can only guess and salvage the meat when it is convenient and appears it will be edible.

    The backstraps (pork loin) covered with rub and cooked whole over a low oak fire can be excellent table fare. Same with the hams -- if you are lucky enough to get a "non-stinky" one. By the way, too often we get a package of commercial bacon with a very distinct "boar taint" smell to it.
     

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