new sako guy looking for info on a Riihimaki

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by 6.5guy, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. 6.5guy

    6.5guy Member

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    Hello from sask. canada I am new to the whole sako game as I upgraded from a tikka t3 last year to a sako 85 hunter. and have started looking for more.

    I just got this little gem in a trade. sako222 Riihimaki no 10164 makers mark and artistic jnt. it has a front sight but no rear sight maybe it went where the rings and bases are? removable peep sight? I tried the interweb and I cant find anything out about the rifle.

    one guy told me this was made for the savage arm co. and not to shoot it because the barrel has bad metal??? I find this hard to believe.

    Also what should I put on it for optics?


    thank you in advance.
     

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  2. 16b410

    16b410 Well-Known Member

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    Savage did not make the rifle, It was made in Finland at the Sako plant and you needn't worry about the steel used in the rifle. You can peruse the internet for info on your early Sako, but if you want mountains of good information, you can find all you need to know right here. Enjoy!
     
  3. 6.5guy

    6.5guy Member

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    I have found (been told) that the correct name is L46, the L46 came out in 1946. I know it can not be older then 1950 because it is a 222., its not a carbine because its the 23.5'' barrel and they originally came with a removable peep sight. I would like to find the date it was made. and a idea of the worth not that I want to sell it. also It doesn't say l46 any where is this normal and what is a hang tag and where do I find it?
     
  4. 16b410

    16b410 Well-Known Member

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    Everything about your rifle sounds normal, including the long barrel. I have never seen a mannlicher with the long barrel, but know that they exist. Eamples of hang tags can be found on this site by clicking on the 'catalogs' tab on the black bar up at the top of the page. Then click on 'hang tags' far right.

    By typing Riihimaki into the search function of this site just to the right of the blue bar and pressing enter you can find loads of info on your rifle from past posts.
     
  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The L46 was the only model/action that Sako made back in the day & although some of the very early L46's were stamped on top of the dovetail with that moniker, Sako stopped stamping them until the very late 50's when the L469 & L57 were also in production. I guess they felt it an unnecessary step that added to costs. Your rifle is probably among the first batch that was chambered in 222 Rem & 1951 is a good guesstimation of it's born on date. The longer barreled Mannlincher configuration is less common than the 20" version & may add a little to it's value. The L46 could be adorned with a Sako made rear peep sight that attached to the rear action dovetail. It had a small stud that fit in the "notch" in the back of that dovetail & clamped on to the dovetail much like the ringmounts do. Value is based on many factors, such as condition, configuration, location, scarcity, etc, etc, so appraising your rifle over the internet is foolhardy. Searching this forum & the gun auction/sale sites would give you an idea of it's approximate value, but it's true value is what a buyer & a seller agree to. The guy who told you it was made for Savage & the metal was bad is a prime example of the ignorance & misinformation that seems to abound in the gun world. Your rifle is an example of one of the finest production rifles ever made & he didn't have a clue what he was looking at!!! I would avoid his "advice" in the future.
     
  6. 6.5guy

    6.5guy Member

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    I think my main hope is i did alright on this rifle with what I traded for it and postage I have around $1100 into it. also the only marks on the mag. are 222rem how do i tell if it is a aftermarket? also is this a pre vixen thanks again the more I learn about this rifle the more happy I am with it. The only down side is my wife seems to think the rifle is hers because I don't need ''another gun''
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2015
  7. bsmith

    bsmith Well-Known Member

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    After market mags do not have the caliber stamped on the bottom, Those stamped "222 rem" are from the factory and came with the earlier L46's. (Sako stamped the later L46's "cal 222".)
     
  8. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Aftermarket magazines generally are not stamped with the caliber & are a dull matte blue. Sako factory magazines are stamped with 222 Rem on the bottom plate & are polished & blued like the rest of the metal. The more you learn about your rifle the less you will worry whether you "did alright". Most here would be happy to even have the opportunity to buy a long barreled Mannlincher model, let alone worry about it's sale price after they already bought it. You have a very nice rifle at a price agreed to by a buyer & a seller that appears to be in the range these rifles sell for. Why not just enjoy it & stop fretting over what is already done.
     
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    First and most importantly: Let your wife believe it is hers! Whatever it takes to get another rifle into the house is worth it.

    Condition is very important to price, but assuming your rifle is in good condition and assuming you are speaking of Canadian Dollars, you are in good shape at $1,100 CAD.

    The earliest L46's chambered in .222 appear to be in the 6,000's and came about 1951. I would guess yours to be about 1952, but it is not possible to get closer than a year or two just by the serial number since Sako sometimes used its actions out of sequential order.
     
  10. L-46

    L-46 Well-Known Member

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    A very nice L46 Mannlicher!
    Thanks for sharing,
    L-46
     
  11. 6.5guy

    6.5guy Member

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    Can anyone tell me what my rate of twist will be on this barrel?
     
  12. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The only way to know for sure is to measure it (tight patch on cleaning rod with ball bearing handle, you know the drill). Some early .222's used the same barrel as the .22 Hornets and were about 1-16" (or the near metric equivalent). Later .222's were switched to the conventional twist for that caliber of about 1-14".

    I have two L46 .222's, both lower numbers than yours, and one has the slower twist and one has the faster. Either shoots a conventional 50 grain cup-and-core spitzer quite accurately.
     
  13. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Great little rifle and in a caliber that should be fun to shoot. Ammo is out there and if you choose to reload you should be able to produce a round that excels in accuracy way beyond what is out there commercially.

    Nice find of a very nice Sako. Clips are available both originals and aftermarket. Prices can vary a lot for them. I've seen originals marketed for over $200. If you just gotta have one of those keep shopping around and you will probably luck into one for a lot less than that.

    I just picked up an aftermarket jobberdoo for about $60. It looks good and functions very well. I can't seem to justify paying more for one of these things unless the rifle is in exceptional condition and doesn't have an original clip in it for some reason.

    rick
     
  14. 6.5guy

    6.5guy Member

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    just to clarify the 35.5'' barrel is more rare or more common? I was talking to a dealer at a gun show here who told me that the longer barrel was more common?
     
  15. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The longer 600 mm (23.6") barrel was more common with L46 full stock rifles, while the shorter 510 mm (20") barrel was more common on the later L461 full stock rifles. Both lengths are found on both models.
     
  16. David Henzler

    David Henzler Well-Known Member

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    Also what should I put on it for optics?

    I'd recommend a 16x or 20x variable. Depends on what you will do with it. If you reload, you'll develop some loads, and during testing at 100 yds, you need to be able to get a good sight picture. Once you have it shooting tight groups... you could switch to a different scope. But if you have a 4-16 stay with it. I put a 6.5-20x40 Leupold on mine. Scope costs almost as much as the rifle if you count the mounts. http://67.76.137.137/sako to see what I did.

    If your barrel isn't shot out, you should be able to get one ragged hole groups. These little babies are really fine rifles.

    Dave
    CCSC cards.jpg
     
  17. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Beautiful rifle and the complete rig is really nice. I noticed one thing about your scope mount setup. On Sako dovetail action rifles the mounts should be roughly in the same location on the front and rear dovetail. If they are not the scope will end up skewed to the right or left of the center line of the barrel. You have plenty of room there to make the adjustment. I recommend that you move the front mount back so it is sitting in the same location on its dovetail as the rear mount. Doing this will line the scope up with the centerline of the bore and save you having to over-adjust the windege adjustment.

    rick
     
  18. bloorooster

    bloorooster Sako-addicted

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    On the subject of Sako dovetails and ring placement...yes..and no. With Sako factory ringsmounts (vintage), the rings are independantly windage adjustable and the front ring can be installed anywhere fore or aft. The rear ring is limited by the recoil stud. Both need to be carefully centered on the bore axis and there are a few different ways to go about it. BUT...When swapping the scope from a small action length to a medium action or vise versa ,the front ring will need to be re-centered.
    NOW...as rick said, when using a Leupold ring set or similar, that is not windage adjustable, the forward movement will move the scope off axis toward the opposing side of the clamping screw, thus the reason to try to effectively place the rings on the center of each dovetail.~Bloo
     

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