Sako New riffle

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by William_Eduard, Sep 25, 2020.

  1. William_Eduard

    William_Eduard Member

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    I recieved this from my dad. but i dont know what sako it is.. can anyone help me to better understand this weapon, is it any good ?? as far as i know its a Sako AV 6,5x55 which a PL 47 cm and TL 102 cm..

     

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  2. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    A real gem, is what you have. It is a Sako AV in a full stock carbine, or mannlicher. Pretty darn rare and appears to be in great condition. AV is simply a later variation of the L61R or Finnbear. It has some slight difference in tang length and other supposed improvements. Many would suggest the improvements were not needed but nevertheless the changes were made. It also may have a Tikka trigger, rather than the famous Sako #4.

    I see original Sako Ringmounts as well. You have a Sako which is rarely seen. Lucky you!!!

    To add, the caliber is wonderful to shoot, as it has mild report. It is very versatile and is underrated in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2020
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  3. Murkula

    Murkula Active Member

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    William,

    that's a really nice Sako AV Mannlicher Carbine you have there! Looking at the bolt knob, Williams rear sight, front sight ramp and the bead I'd estimate the year of manufacture to be in the mid 1980's - serial number might help to narrow this down further.

    Looks like the front sight hood has gone MIA at some point, but that's not a big deal. Before you shoot this rifle, make sure that the action screws are tight. Also, I think it would be good idea to put some oil on the stock as well. Product I'd very much recommend for this purpose is Scherell's Shaftol Dunkel http://schaftol.de/English/english.html

    I hope you will take this rifle hunting and bag a nice roebuck!
     
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  4. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Your dad has great taste. A very fine rifle in a very fine caliber. Congrats......
     
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  5. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    I agree that this is indeed a very nice rifle, and you're lucky to have acquired it. However, with all due respect, I'm not sure about the recommendation of adding oil to the stock. As I understand it, Scherell's Schaftol is an oil gunstock finish (analogous, but not identical, to boiled linseed oil) to be used to finish a stock, not to be added over an existing finish unless, perhaps, the original finish was itself Scherell's Schaftol or a similar oil. It also evidently contains liquid silicone, which is something I’d hesitate to rub into a stock. I don’t know what finish Sako used on that stock (I’d guess that it is a harder polyester), but I very much doubt that it was a true oil finish. Instead, I'd recommend Renaissance Wax, which can be applied over any stock finish to keep the wood protected without penetrating as an oil finish would, and I'd recommend it for the exposed metal surfaces as well.
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2020
  6. Murkula

    Murkula Active Member

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    South Pender:

    Thank you for your comment! Sako rifles of this era were available with three different finishes: glossy lacquer, matte lacquer and oil finish. Looking at checkering on William's AV Carbine, I'd say it has oil finish. Keeping an oiled gun stock oiled will prevent it from absorbing moisture and then eventually cracking when the stock dries out.

    According to Scherell's page:

    "Thus, any wooden gunstock requires regular treatment with gunstock oil SCHAFTOL® is perfectly suited for this purpose, being a specific gunstock oil of high quality and comprising nothing but the finest natural substances together with a slight addition of silicone."

    I've personally used this on my Sakos with oiled stock and found it to work great - Dunkel / Dark matches the color of oil finished Sako stocks really well. When applying this oil to an already finished gun stock, I first clean the stock and use a small sponge to rub the oil into the wood.

    More information can be found here:

    http://schaftol.de/English/Directions_for_use_Contens/body_directions_for_use_contens.html
     
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  7. William_Eduard

    William_Eduard Member

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    Thank You all, it’s my frist rifle, so im quite happy with the feedback. The serial number is 604081

    I’ll take good care of it
     
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  8. William_Eduard

    William_Eduard Member

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    Thanks, the serial number is 604081
     
  9. Murkula

    Murkula Active Member

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    Ok, this will put the date of manufacture around early 1987.
     
  10. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    What information, data or evidence do you have that tells you the year of manufacture was 1987?
     
  11. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    That's interesting Murkula. I don't believe I've seen a factory Sako with what I would regard as a true oil finish, or maybe I have and didn't know it! I wonder what "oil finish" process Sako has used. Surely not the repeated application of boiled linseed, tung, or similar oil with wet and dry sandings, rubbing, and burnishing between applications until the pores are filled and a hard and lustrous surface coat builds up that we see on oil-finished custom rifles. That would obviously be far too labor-intensive and costly for any factory rifle. Do (or did) they have some sort of one-shot or greatly-abbreviated process with oil?
     
  12. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Can you provide any evidence or documentation that Sako used those three different stock finishes on rifles of "that era"?
     
  13. Johan Lindh

    Johan Lindh Well-Known Member

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    Here in Sweden, lacquered finishes are extremely rare.

    I've never seen the semi gloss and only a few gloss finished.

    As to what oil was used, I don't know.

    I myself would never use pigmented oil. Boiled linseed oil works well enough.

    If you need faster penetration/drying, mixing it with turpentine (1/4 - 1/2) will speed things along.
     
  14. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    There was a poster (evidently now deceased) on the Rimfire Central Forum who was an expert in gunstock work, particularly finishing. His forum name there is Noremf. He produced a number of really informative stickies on that forum on gunstock making and finishing, had researched many finishing techniques, and seemed to have seen it all. When the topic of Anschutz stock finishes had come up, Noremf noted that what Anschutz has referred to as an "oil finish" is not really what they claim, but rather what he termed a "wiping varnish" finish, which is a finish designed to mimic one with a natural plant/vegetable oil--the plant/vegetable oil mimicked being tung oil. So not really an oil finish, but a much faster process using a diluted oil-based varnish that is wiped on and can be completed relatively quickly with very few coats. The result is a dull finish (with many pores not filled) that some might mistake for an authentic oil finish.

    I'm wondering whether what Sako has referred to in the past as an "oil finish" is instead a wiping varnish finish, like that on many Anschutz rifles. (Anschutz now seems to have gone to a straight poly finish.) If that's the case, swabbing oil onto the stock will produce nothing of value--just a sticky mess. There are, however, several waxes that can be applied to such a stock to spruce up its appearance and make it more water-repellent. According to Noremf, the thing to avoid is a wax containing mineral oil or silicone. His recommendation was Renaissance Wax, which contains polyethylene waxes. Another wax from England that has a following in the world of high-end double guns is CCL Gunstock Wax Polish. I don’t know the specific ingredients in this wax, but it is advertised as ideal for true oil-finished gunstocks.

    Here is a link to four articles that Noremf wrote, each in PDF form:

    https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=539268

    Edit. At the risk of wandering too far into the weeds, here is another piece by Noremf on how to properly clean the topcoat/finish of a stock before applying wax.

    https://www.rimfirecentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=493365
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2020
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  15. 16b410

    16b410 Well-Known Member

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    I am interested in hearing about the three finishes and what constitutes each one of them chemically. I am aware of the Sako 'sort of' glossy lacquer finish (if you want to call it a finish) as it was on my AIII Classic. Hunting in weather took that lacquer off of my gunstock like a car wash takes dirt off of my cars. It now has a Tru-Oil finish, and that oil is an oil I have learned to love. I do remember once seeing an AV Mannlicher at a gun show that looked like a very dull and flat oil finish. But I can't remember seeing more than just that one. Another Sako tidbit awaits to be learned.
     
  16. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sako sometimes distributed slightly different products depending on where they were going. All non-glossy Sako stocks I've ever seen in the U.S. were actually matte lacquer (I'm using the term "lacquer" to include synthetics like polyurethane). I've never seen a factory original Sako oil-finished stock although they certainly may have made them for distribution in places other than the U.S.
     
  17. Johan Lindh

    Johan Lindh Well-Known Member

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    This is my AV Lyx.

    It has the same finnish as my AV standard.

    The picture is of one of very few dings on it, and as you (maybe) see, there is no lacquer on it. Matte or otherwise.

    This is the same "oiled" finish that the 85 is sold with today. At least, it looks the same.

    Not that it matters much, I just thaught the thread needed another picture. 20200811_214533.jpg
     
  18. gowyo

    gowyo Sako Junkie

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    William, that kokotukki is a fine heirloom/ gift from your dad. I'm sure you will always treasure it...except for that scope. Please delegate it to a beater .22lr ASAP. Your carbine deserves a high quality, lower powered variable. I recently purchased an AII carbine that is wearing a leupold 2.5 x 8 vari-xIII. I'm certain there are several European brands that would be even more adequate- Meopta, Kahles, Swarovski, Zeiss, S&B. That gun deserves the best.
     
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  19. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    If you look at the boxes or inventory tags of Sako rifles, the wooden stocks have two choices for finish: "öljy" (oil) or "lakka" (lacquer). Whether these equate to what we would call oil and lacquer is uncertain. The "lakka" is the glossy, hard-shell finish and the "öljy" is the satin that still shows the pores in the wood. I think the oil is probably some kind of blend of natural and synthetic oils, compounded to give an acceptable finish with one or two coats. The lacquer is most likely polyurethane. Those are my guesses, anyway.
     
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  20. Makoman

    Makoman Active Member

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    My recently acquired AV would seem to have a similar finish to yours. I use Old English lemon oil on it, and my wooden stocked Beretta and Benelli shotgun stocks and it seems to do a good job and doesn't affect the color of the wood.
     

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