New Member Larry

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by LARRY JESSEN, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. LARRY JESSEN

    LARRY JESSEN Member

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    Hello, Am new to club. Have a Forester L579 22-250 and a M78 22lr. Did own a Forester L579 243 at one time. Am in need of a original front site hood for the M78. Thanks for any help on finding this.

     

  2. Tomball

    Tomball Well-Known Member

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    Check eBay, they come up occasionally.
     
  3. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Every M78 I have ever seen has had US-made Williams sights, if it had sights at all. If yours has the Williams sights, just get a hood from Williams. It should be identical to the original.
     
  4. LARRY JESSEN

    LARRY JESSEN Member

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    Thank You for your response. Have been watching e-bay for about 4 months now, so far nothing.
     
  5. LARRY JESSEN

    LARRY JESSEN Member

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    Thank You for that response. I think you are correct, it is williams. How are they listed for a contact? I see you are a pilot? Been there done that in my younger history.
     
  6. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Try this link:
    https://williamsgunsight.com
    Look under gunsights-misc and you'll find their standard hood, which looks just like the one that would have been original to your M78. I've attached a picture of an AIII carbine which has the same type of Williams sights and a correct hood. You can also get Williams products from sources like Brownell's.

    I picked up my pilot ratings (single-engine land and glider) as a teenage Civil Air Patrol cadet. I could never fly professionally because of bad vision (which also kept me out of Vietnam, so not all bad). The photo was taken in a C-130 over the jungle in Liberia. I was part of a team inspecting the US Embassy in Monrovia during the civil war, and a bunch of us got to drinking a few beers with a crew of mercenaries who were doing food drops for the UN. One thing led to another and the command pilot invited us to go for a ride and see what they did for a living. My boss, an adventurous type who had previously served as Ambassador to Iraq and Yemen, jumped on it and so did I. So at oh-dark-thirty the next morning, there we were at Roberts Field watching the crew preflight a C-130A that was on charter to the UN. We flew for an hour or two into the interior until we reached the target village. The load was several tons of bagged rice. The bags were heavy enough that very few of them broke. The drop run was pretty exciting. Ever seen a C-130 in slow flight? Nose up, flaps down, hanging on the props with the engines screaming flat out - not your everyday milk run. Airspeed was about 60 knots if I recall correctly. They had the drop so carefully calculated that the airspeed balanced the wind resistance and the bags dropped vertically. The bags were on pallets but not secured. The entire load was held in place with a single heavy nylon strap, and the loadmaster, clipped into a harness, was standing by the rear door with a giant Bowie knife. On a signal from the copilot, he cut the strap and the load started sliding out the rear doors. Meanwhile I was at the front of the cargo bay, wrapped around a stanchion with a Nikon in my hand, frantically taking pictures of the operation. The last shot is fantastic - you are looking through the open cargo doors at the huts in the village, with bags of rice flying through the air and the villagers rushing to pick up the bags that had already landed. Unfortunately I don't have a digital copy to post. Anyway after the drop the pilot straightened up the aircraft, pointed the nose toward Monrovia, and invited me to fly the plane home from the copilot's seat. He gave me course headings and the occasional correction, but I did actually get to fly the aircraft. The pilot talked me into the approach pattern and actually only took the controls back when we were on final approach. That was one of my best adventures and it made up for spending a month in Monrovia with a checkpoint manned by Nigerian peacekeepers as the only thing between me and the chaos of a war zone. Being a diplomat is not all striped pants and cocktail parties!

    AIII Carbine 30-06 1.JPG
     
    ricksengines and Sean Hodges like this.
  7. LARRY JESSEN

    LARRY JESSEN Member

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  8. LARRY JESSEN

    LARRY JESSEN Member

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    What a super adventure on a whim chance of right place at right time. I soloed in a Cessna 172 and transitioned over to a Piper PA 28 140 (flat land plane), which I owned. Long time ago.
    Just called Williams and ordered a hood, will see what I get , was $16.90 included shipping . It is after market, but he indicated would be like OEM, so see what we get. I have looked at quite a few pictures on internet and your picture seems to look the same, slanted in back and straight in front. (if I was seeing your pic correctly).
    Thanks for the info, enjoyed your story. We have alot of C-130's based where I live set up for Fire fighting forest fires in Co.
     

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