New Member First Sako purchase looking for info and advice

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by Lilr69, May 22, 2020.

  1. Lilr69

    Lilr69 Member

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    Hello all, I’ve recently purchased my first sako, I’ve been an admirer all my life and fortunate enough to hunt with 2 ,one was my fathers when I was a teen it was a 7mm mag and I took my first deer with it ( 36-37 years ago) the other was my wife’s Grandfathers that he loaned me for a weekend trip right after we were married 32 yrs ago and I have always wanted one. The rifle I purchased is an A III in 300 win mag 533xxx it was a little dirty and looked to not be taken very good care of but I knew it would clean up nice and it sure did I think it’s Awsome the only thing I don’t like is it has a composite stock thats not very good and is not befitting such a masterpiece please tell me that they didn’t come this way and is there any way to know which stock it would have left the factory with, I’ve looked at replacements and won’t mind putting out the money but I’ve seen a lot of different ones and finishes and don’t know which one is right and how it will effect the value can someone please help?

     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The A-III used the same stock inletting as its predecessor, the L61R. A stock for either will fit. The factory A-III stock typically had a high-gloss finish and a high, sharp Monte Carlo hump. To my knowledge no A-III's came with composite stocks as that started with the A-V series, so your stock is probably aftermarket. However, some A-III's did come with a matte or low luster finish.

    But let me warn you, factory stocks in nice condition can be pricey. You won't improve the value of your rifle by as much as it costs you to replace the stock, so replace it only if it is worth it to you to have a nicer looking gun.
     
  3. Lilr69

    Lilr69 Member

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    Thanks for the info Stonecreek, I have looked around a bit and have seen a few stocks, I do want a nicer looking gun so I think I’ll get a nice stock, my limited experience with Sakos are the beautiful wood stocks from years ago and that is the image in my mind, I won’t mind having a little more in it than it’s worth being it’s my first one, I’ll never forget that 7 mag my dad had when I was young and I fell in love with sako, I know I will own another one or two in the future now that my kids are all grown and I can manage to save a little extra, and I will be better informed on what to look for in my next sakos ,thanks again for the info
     
  4. Tomball

    Tomball Well-Known Member

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    Keep a lookout on eBay. There is an AIII for sale now but as with anything without having it in your hands before buying, buyer beware.
     
  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Not sure how many years ago you are referring to, but Sako didn't have very good wood on most of their standard sporters early on. It was OK, but not great & was covered in a dark poly coating that hid any beauty that was there. In fact, some of the wood during the 1960's & 70's was down right ugly, but an occasional gem would slip through. The Deluxes of that time frame where nicer, but really nice exceptional wood was rare even on them. Sako gradually improved the wood in the late 70's, but it wasn't until the 80's & the AV era that Sako focused on the wood used in their stocks & made an effort to make stocks that had truly pleasing grain & figure. Be aware that Sako changed their barrel contour over time through production periods & all stocks that fit your inletting won't necessarily allow the barrel to fit. Good luck in your quest.
     
  6. Lilr69

    Lilr69 Member

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    Thanks Tomball, I’ll keep eBay in mind.
     
  7. Lilr69

    Lilr69 Member

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    I was 13 or 14 years old when my dad bought the rifle so that would have been 1983 +/-, it was a light colored stock with the darker piece on the forend with the light bear head on the grip, it was truly a beautiful gun, my wife’s grandfather’s sako was the darker color and he had owned it quite a while when we got married back in 88 so I would guess it was 60’s maybe 70’s , it spent most of its life in a gun cabinet and had seen minimal use, it was in great shape and also a nice gun but not quite like the one my dad had, but thanks for the reply Paulson,I appreciate the info about the barrel fitment I had no idea, I will keep it in mind when I’m looking for my stock.
     
  8. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Your dad had a Deluxe model. In addition to the rosewood forearm tip & grip cap they had skipline checkering & were more blonde in color. The purchase date indicates it was probably an AV action which had a longer rear tang then the L61R or AIII. Wood on the AV Deluxes could be quite striking, as you can attest to. IMHO, the AV Deluxe was the aesthetic pinnacle of Sako rifles, so it's no wonder it has stayed in your memory.
     

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