New L461 .222 Looking for info on it

Discussion in 'Show us your Sako' started by Curt Bloom, Jul 30, 2020.

  1. Curt Bloom

    Curt Bloom Member

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    Hi folks. Just picked up a beautiful L461 in .222. According to the previous owner, it has sat in the gun safe for atleast the last 30 years. The gun looks like it is brand new. I looked up the serial number and I believe it is a 1965. I am looking for any info I can get on the gun. Is the stock original? I’ve never seen a curly maple stock on a Sako quite like this one. Also might the High Country scope be period correct for the gun? I’m also wondering an approximate value of it. Thanks in advance.

     

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  2. Rogan Kinnear

    Rogan Kinnear Well-Known Member

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    I am by no means a Sako expert by any stretch of the imagination but I suspect that is a custom stock. I can tell you that it appears to have an MV stamp on the receiver which shows that it was inspected by Matti Vartia. There should be a matching stamp on the left-hand side of the barrel down from the calibre stamp that is found on top of the barrel.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
  3. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    That is definitely a custom stock, and a lovely piece of wood. The design and inlay place it firmly in the era when Weatherby was the style king. I had never heard of High Country scopes, but I did a little Google research and found that the High Country name is actually part of Tasco, an importer of mostly budget scopes. If I owned that rifle I'd probably put a better scope on it, but the Tasco is OK for casual range shooting if it is in good condition.

    Enjoy your custom Sako!
     
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  4. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Pics of the barrel stampings would tell us if it was a factory barreled rifle put in a custom stock or a custom rifle built on a Sako action. A factory barrel will have Sako & the Caliber stamped on top of the barrel just forward of the action. The club's Factory Records Service goes up to serial number 111,xxx, so you can find out how & when it left the factory. Sako did supply actions only, in the white, back in those days. The style of the stock & the inlay were typical of the mid 60's customs.
     
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  5. Curt Bloom

    Curt Bloom Member

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    There are no visible markings on the barrel. The only markings on the gun are what is pictured on the left side of the action. I have heard that some barrel markings are underneath the barrel, could that be the case? If it is a totally custom gun built around a Sako action, how does that affect the value?
     
  6. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    If there are no markings on the barrel, it is a gunsmith-installed custom item. There would be no markings under the barrel except maybe an assembly number or something like that. The lack of barrel markings adds to the case that the gun was built on a bare Sako action. As far as value goes, a custom rifle is worth what a willing buyer will pay a willing seller. Prices for custom guns are all over the map. I see custom Sakos advertised for thousands of dollars (but I don't know if they actually changed hands at those prices) and I see them going for the price of an average original, or sometimes less. It mostly depends on the quality of the work and a certain luck factor of whether it appeals to a buyer with money. In favor of your rifle are the beautiful wood and the generally high quality of workmanship. The down side is that 1960's styling. Radical Monte Carlo stocks and wood inlays are not currently in style. Yours are, however, nicely done and not at the weird fringe of what they were building in the 60's. Another negative is the lack of checkering. I see a surprising number of otherwise high-end customs without checkering, possibly because checkering involves hours of highly skilled hand work, which is also highly expensive.

    My suggestion is, enjoy your rifle and don't obsess over the value.
     
  7. Curt Bloom

    Curt Bloom Member

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    Thanks ice bear for your info. I’m not obsessing over the value, just thought I could maybe find out if I came away with a good deal or not. It is a beautiful gun to me regardless. Just shot it for the first time yesterday and had it putting 1/2” groups at 100yds. So I’m definitely happy with that.
     
  8. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Isn't that all that really matters?
     
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    To paraphrase a distinguished Sako authority, "Isn't that all that really matters?"
     

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