New here with an L469

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by w corey, Feb 25, 2021.

  1. w corey

    w corey Member

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    Hello, ran across this fine site and just had to sign up.
    I'm not actually a collector as such but have had a long appreciation for all things Sako.
    Back in the late sixties when I was probably 9 or 10, I had a big Herters catalog with a "some day when I get older wish list" of underlined items the top of which was a Finnbear heavy barreled action in 243, a laminated stock and Unertyl scope. Never fulfilled that exact dream but did manage to find an L469 in 222 rem mag, probably close to 40 years ago now.


    l469 r.jpg l469 l.jpg

    Did a bit of work to the trigger as well as a shoe and have a sketchy recollection of there being a condition issue with the butt plate/pad and subsequently making a replacement but appeared to be all original when I got it.
    I believe it to be a 1962 or possibly late '61 by the serial #557xx.
    It's a very good shooter, will do clover leaves at 100yds with good handloads. In working up loads the biggest single thing was a fairly long overall length, to the point were the cartridges don't fit in the magazine. Not sure if that's just typical of how they were chambered or if there's some throat erosion, but so far nothing has changed so it's all ok with me.
    If I ever retire it as a bench gun, I put aside a nice 3x9 Redfield of the approximate vintage that should compliment it nicely.

    Bill
     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Nice rifle, Bill. Your rifle originally had a plastic buttplate. Whoever added the recoil pad with white line spacer did a good job. Your "wish list" of a 243 Win in a Finnbear was not obtainable, as the Finnbear was the long action Sako & was never chambered in that round. You must be recalling the medium action, which was marketed as the "Forester". You can find out when your rifle was made & when it left the factory buy clicking on our Factory Records Service & requesting the data. The L461 replaced the L46 & L469 in 1961 & your serial number would indicate that your rifle was made before 1961. Welcome to our club!
     
  3. mattimoose

    mattimoose Well-Known Member

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    Herter's Catalogues is awesome!
     
  4. w corey

    w corey Member

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    Ah yes, Forester it must have been, 50 something year old memories get a bit dim...
    The pad was something I constructed, I do all my own gunsmithing. Will have to dig around and see if I can find the original, usually something I wouldn't throw out.
    My assumptions as to the year I extrapolated from an apparently inaccurate list of dates and serial numbers for L46/L469/L461's that I copied from somewhere or other.
    The couple 1960 guns were in the mid 4xxxx range, the '61's all 49xxx-54xxx, no 62's listed and the '63 L461's were all 62xxx and above.

    I'm here to learn...
     
  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Bill: The L469 was nothing more than a L46 modified to accept the slightly longer 222 Rem Mag. Some 222 Rem Mags were stamped L46, but sometime in 1959 the L469 stamping was started. The original production of the L46/469 was around 59,000 rifles & ended in 1961, with the introduction of the L461. However, Sako did make a small run of the L46, probably from leftover parts, around 1963. Not sure how many, but IIRC the serial numbers I've seen for them were in the 80,000 range. Sako did not make rifles in sequential order, so trying to date or extrapolate a date of production is futile. The club has factory records showing rifles with serial numbers right next to each other being shipped many years apart & rifles with serial numbers thousands apart being shipped on the same day. That your rifle is a 222 Rem Mag allows us to be confident it was made between 1959 & 1961. A factory records search will tell you it's exact birthday & when & to who it was shipped. Take anything you see about Sako dates & serial numbers with a grain of salt. You can, however, use different features, modifications, stock styles, barrel contours, stampings, & importers, etc. to approximate a production date when factory records are unavailable. This serial number/date thing is just one of the many quirks & oddities about Sakos that keep us all "still learning".
     
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  6. Henry Percy

    Henry Percy Member

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    I just replied to another thread. I picked up my first Sako, also in .222 Mag. Mine is L469, 450XX. Any idea what the twist rate would be? I think it's about 1/16", which seems quite slow. Do you have any pet loads you would share, or the direction to point me in?

    As I mentioned in the other post, I'm having it professionally refinished. I'll post photos when it's done.

    Oh, it came with an old Weaver K6 scope. I'm replacing it with a Vortex. I was thinking of selling the Weaver. Should I keep it with the rifle?

    Thanks for any thoughts.
     
  7. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    SAAMI spec for the 222 Rem Mag is 1 in 12". Sako was already making 1 in 14" barrels for the 222 Rem when they started chambering for the Mag version, so it wouldn't surprise me if they used the 14 twist, at least initially, with the Magnum. I doubt they would have used a 16 twist when they were making a 14 already. Your patch may be slipping the rifling a little when you measured it. Use a really tight patch, go slow & carefully, & do it about 6 or 8 times & take an average & you should be able to determine the actual twist or it's close metric equivalent. Nothing special about the Weaver. Loading manuals are much better sources for loading info than you will find on any forum. What works in someone else's rifle is irrelevant to yours.
     
  8. Henry Percy

    Henry Percy Member

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    Thanks for the tips. I did have trouble with the rod not turning, and I tried a variety of patch sizes.

    I should have mentioned that before posting I consulted 3 loading manuals as well as Ken Waters' Pet Loads book. Two of the manuals had no .222 Mag loads at all. The third had data for only one bullet. Waters was the best, but his article appeared in 1970, so he had no access to the powders developed in the past 50 years. Someone else suggested that I start with .223 loads.
     
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The .223 has a bit higher standard maximum chamber pressure than the .222 Magnum, but that is a bureaucratic thing having to do with getting the .223 to the velocity the military required -- both cases are identical in construction and are made to use the same pressures. Since the .222 Magnum has about 5% more case capacity than the .223, loads for the .223 will (nominally) generate slightly less pressure and velocity when used in the .222 Magnum. Depending on what you want from your rifle you can typically add a small percentage more powder when using the .222 Magnum and achieve a small percentage more velocity than the .223 -- although the difference is negligible.

    Some data sources offer data for the 5.56 Nato which, although identical to the .223, is loaded to "military" pressures which would be higher but are somewhat reduced by its rather "loose" chamber specs that keep pressures lower. Considering the larger case capacity of the .222 Magnum, 5.56 data (for bullets 60 grains and under) will be pretty close to "full pressure" for your .222 Magnum.

    I have multiple Sakos in .222, .223, and .222 Magnum. The practical difference in any of them when loaded to similar pressures will be undetectable to a rockchuck.
     
  10. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Go to the on-line Hodgdon Reloading Data Center & you will find loads for the 222 Rem Mag using 6 different bullet weights & 15 different powders. It's FREE!
     
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  11. Henry Percy

    Henry Percy Member

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    Very informative. Thank you for sharing your knowledge.
     
  12. Henry Percy

    Henry Percy Member

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    As mentioned, I'm having the stock refinished. Today the man sent pictures of dark streaks on the cheekpiece and by the action that he cannot remove. He tried 6-7 applications of oxalic acid. No joy.

    He said he could stain it to make it a uniform color, but that would hide the different woods on the forend and pistol grip cap. Besides, the rest of the wood is gorgeous. Any suggestions?

    See pictures.
     

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