Need Your Input

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by walksoftly, Dec 18, 2015.

  1. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Good Morning WS,

    I applaud you're excitement. Getting the PPC is great and taking it to the range is going to be a lot of fun. I know the guys are going to beat me up when I say this but I never had to turn a neck on a case. I think doing that it totally unnecessary and if you don't know what you are doing the aftermath can have really dire consequences. In your case, you should get your mitts on some commercially produced rounds for you're first few trips to the range. Later you can advance to more complicated (but fun and rewarding) dimension of reloading. Know that not all cases are alike in terms of the thickness of the brass at the neck. Newly formed cases may tend to have a thickening of the brass there and the cure is not to turn the neck from the outside. Instead a case reamer is generally used to remove just the right amount of brass from inside the neck. This operation is always performed with the case firmly nestled inside of a special reamer die designed specifically for that purpose. A FL die specifically designed for the smaller neck in rifles where the reamer used to cut it into the chamber was intentionally ground to be undersize are available. Usually they are neck sizers that are used to resize the neck after reaming so the entire case isn't reworked as part of a FL sizing operation.

    I can only recall a few really drastic times when I had to ream necks. They do come up however depending on the extreme nature of the forming operation and the thickness of the neck wall after the case is formed. The reamer die is usually provided (with the reamer) as part of a Form Die Set. In your case, RCBS, Redding and others can provide a FL die that will produce a resized case that is just right for a tight chamber so don't go to extremes and fret about neck turning because after reloading for over 50 years I can safely say that I have never turned the outside of a case neck. Over the years I have reformed thousands of cases using the 30-06 to make 257, 6mm, and others. I have also made hundreds of 17 caliber cases from Fireball and 223 cases and the only case I reamed recently was 17-222 from 222 cases. Piece of cake.


    rick
     

  2. 16b410

    16b410 Well-Known Member

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    Paul, About 4 years or so ago the government decided that primers shipped separately were no more hazardous than primers shipped in an assembled cartridge. They decided that as such, primers would be exempted from the fee. They also set the date for it to take effect and it was not to be immediate, but later. I'm going from memory here, so don't hold me to it, but I think that date was 2015. Ah, the government.
     
  3. walksoftly

    walksoftly Active Member

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    rick, thank you for the great info! I'm hoping, as my familiarity with reloading increases, I'll be more adventurous. Trying other more advanced techniques, like you mentioned, making cases out of other calibers. Right now, it's good advice to stick to the basics.
     
  4. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Right. I remember starting with a little Lee loader and a small hammer. Made some pretty good .303's back when I was around 16. My mom had an absolute fit when she saw the can of 3031 sitting on the kitchen table and me wacking away at the cases with my hammer. I used her cutting board and did the deed on the kitchen table. Didn't have a workbench back in the day so I had to use what was available. After she came down off of the ceiling and I was able to show her the instructions that came with the loader I remember her telling me to be careful and not blow myself up. Couldn't do that with smokeless powder if I wanted to unless I did something really stupid.

    AH! For the good ole' days. Life was simpler back then. But, in retrospect I was poorer than a church mouse and a surplus .303 Enfield was about all I could afford.

    rick
     
  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    So it's only powder that is subject to the HazMat fee since or when the primer exemption takes effect? That means that powder in a can is hazardous, but powder in a brass case is not. Now, primers whether in a box or in a cartridge that is in a box are non-hazardous. I be confused!!!
     
  6. mw999

    mw999 Member

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    Question on trigger group on A Series vs "target trigger". I have a Sako A series rifle, conventional trigger. Never taken the trigger out. I also have a HB PPC B series, with two holes in trigger guard. I have been told in the past the only difference was the external adjustments made it easier to adjust the trigger, but that the trigger itself was the same. Once that Q is semi answered, I remember that the A series Rifles (shrouded bolt) also had somewhat of a different trigger than the 1970s, exposed bolt centerfire rifles. Can someone comment on these two issues? thanks in advance. I have also seen advertised on Gunsinternational a "varmint" trigger and a "target" trigger if this helps jog anyone's memory. There are HB A series rifles that do not have holes in trigger guard.
     
  7. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    There is no "B" series Sako. The 6 PPC was built on the AI action, so I assume you are referring to the "B" (they also had "A" & "C") in the special serial numbers the single shot AI target rifles had. The standard AI had the standard Sako #4 trigger. The single shot PPC's had the externally adjustable target trigger, which is different from the #4. The target trigger is capable of pull weights in the ounces!! not pounds. The #4 trigger was introduced with the L461 in the early sixties & continued to be used in the AI thru the 80's. IIRC, Sako changed to a different trigger very late in the A series production, say early 90's or so, but I've never seen one. Just because a A series rifle has a Heavy Barrel doesn't make it the target version with the target trigger as you will find all of them, except the very few single shot PPCs, have the #4 trigger & no holes in the trigger guard. There are many unknowledgeable sellers that advertise things about Sakos that are incorrect, so take what you see on the gun sale sites with a grain of salt. The majority of sellers don't know much about Sakos, but it's mainly due to unfamiliarity rather than trying to mislead. I do see Sako heavy barrels for sale with aftermarket Canjar & Timney triggers that are marketed as having "target" or "varmint" triggers on occasion, so that could be a source of confusion as well.
     
  8. walksoftly

    walksoftly Active Member

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    UPDATE. I picked up the rifle yesterday. I haven't gotten a chance to thoroughly clean it. However, I did manage to take pictures. It isn't without it's issues. I don't think any are major, mostly handling bumps and dings. There is a small blemish on the bluing, as you can see from the picture.

    IMG_1270.JPG IMG_1276.JPG IMG_1278.JPG IMG_1279.JPG IMG_1271.JPG IMG_1272.JPG IMG_1273.JPG IMG_1274.JPG IMG_1275.JPG IMG_1277.JPG
     
  9. walksoftly

    walksoftly Active Member

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    UPDATE

    It's been almost a month, but I finally was able to take it out to the range on Saturday. Picture attached @ 100 yards I know, I know. It's not a very good grouping. I agree. Three factors played into that though. (4 actually...me being the 4th. I was a little rusty.)

    FACTOR 1
    I was shooting to the south. There was a solid 17-19 mph wind coming out of the SW, so a cross wind was present.

    FACTOR 2
    I was shooting off of a very makeshift bench rest. See picture.

    FACTOR 3
    I was also shooting my 25-06. Fatigue of shoulder/arm was setting in. That's what happens when you shoot almost 50 rounds.

    I was very impressed on the smoothness of the action and the lightness of the trigger. Very nice shooter. Making more ammo as to have it ready the next time I head to the range. Only made 30 rounds for the 6mm. I had three different types of bullets, so I didn't want to go overboard on any single one just in case the gun had a favorite. You might be wondering why there is only 4 rounds on the target when I had 30. I started off at 25 yards, checking scope accuracy. And, that was the tightest grouping. I'd be even more embarrassed if I post the other two targets.

    I also added a picture of the 25-06 target @100 yards. Which isn't that great either. I probably should have stopped shortly after.
    TARGET.jpg
    6mm @ 100 yards

    BENCHREST.jpg

    25-06.jpg
    25-06 @ 100 yards
     

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