NAACO Grizzly .308

Discussion in 'Other firearms built on Sako actions' started by robinpeck, Feb 13, 2017.

  1. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    An on-line friend recently sent me some photos of his newly acquired NAACO "Grizzly" Sako L57 .308. He is seeking more information on this rifle. It looks to me to be a Model 50 "Deluxe". Nice piece of wood.

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    Last edited: Feb 13, 2017

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Yes, quite a nice piece of wood in the classic style. Thanks for posting photos of this rare bird.
     
  3. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    I think the owner will chime in at some point with a full description. I think he has joined the forum. I have only seen his photos. Aside from my .222, I have never actually seen another NAACO.
     
  4. wjklassen

    wjklassen Member

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    Hello, everyone:

    This is my first post on this forum although I have visited the site a number of times.

    I'm following up on the pictures Robin Peck posted for me of my recently-acquired SAKO L57 No. 2191, so marked on the left side of the receiver. The barrel is marked in three lines front of the receiver, at right angles to the bore, “NORTH AMERICA ARMS” and “CAL. .308 GRIZZLY” and “MADE IN CANADA”. The number “2191” is stamped on the underside of the barrel just in front of the receiver. As the pictures posted by Robin show, it has a walnut stock with a straight comb and a cheek piece, European looking, and checkering on the pistol grip and forearm. The forearm has a black plastic tip and the pistol grip has a black plastic cap. The black plastic butt plate is marked “NAA”. I purchased the rifle on-line from a gun store in Ontario.

    I’m curious about this piece. Based on what members of this site know of NAA proprietary Sakos, did NAA import the actions and then barrel and stock them at their facility in Toronto? It appears the action and barrel were bedded in a brown compound; the fit is exceedingly snug. Does anyone here know how many of these Sakos NAA made?

    Overall the rifle is in good to very good condition. There is some shallow pitting on the barrel surface in front of the forearm that appears to have been rubbed, dulling the blueing, but the rest of the metal and blueing is very good. The bore is bright with excellent rifling. The stock and finish are in very good condition with some dents and scratches. The butt stock has some nice figure. It came with scope bases and a front sight. I’ll be mounting a Weaver K4-1 scope of that era on it and as soon as it warms up I’ll take it to the range to try it out.

    Bill Klassen
    Whitehorse, Y.T.
     
  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Bill,

    Neither the barrel nor the stock is from Sako, only the action.

    I doubt that it was bedded with a bedding compound at the factory since that method wasn't typically used in factory rifles. I would guess that it was done by a subsequent owner in later years when all of the rage became "glass bedding".

    Sako would have stamped the serial number of the action, 2191, at the factory. It appears that NAACO put that same number on the barrel they installed (or had a contractor install -- no one is sure exactly who did the work on these.)

    The Weaver K-4 should make a nice contemporaneous match for a rifle made in the late 50's or early 60's.
     
  6. wjklassen

    wjklassen Member

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    Thanks for your comment, Stonecreek.
    To confirm your observation, the barrel is a different hue of blueing, starting towards purple.
    I like the old steel Weavers; I've had good service from them over the years.
    Bill
    p.s. As a side note, I should be receiving in the next day or so a NAACO Grizzly No. 10 single shot bolt action .22 rifle. Unfortunately, there is no Sako connection.
     
  7. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    How can we be sure that it is not a Sako barrel? Is there any way to identify a Sako barrel, other than it being stamped "Sako"? Some characteristics that would identify a barrel as likely being made by Sako? (The barrel on my NAACO/Sako L41 .222 is stamped "Original Sako Barrel" on the bottom underneath the stock near the receiver). Is there any way to identify who did make the barrel on this .308 Grizzly?
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The serial number for this action in the Sako records shows it to be an action-only. Therefore, I assume it not to have a Sako barrel. Of course, a Sako-made barrel could have been later fitted to it as an aftermarket item, but aftermarket Sako barrels typically bore Sako markings.
     
  9. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Excellent pics and a beautiful rifle. Nice catch. That said my stomach turns at the sight of those Weaver mounts. I just can't stand to see them on any rifle let alone a Sako.

    rick
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    But the redeeming feature of the Weaver bases for Sako dovetails is that they are extremely versatile: They will fit in almost any wastebasket.
     
  11. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    Aside from them being cheap and ugly, whats so wrong with Weavers? They just slip on, not doing any damage to the receiver. Plus, they do work and there are a nearly infinite number of rings made for them.
     
  12. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    First, it is not possible to mount a scope low with the Weavers since they sit atop the dovetails and the height of the rings is added to them. This makes them inappropriate for scopes with less than 40mm objectives.

    They also use a set screw, which does mar the top of the dovetail surface. Whether the aluminum bases will stay in place without a set screw like the steel Redfield/Burris system I'm not aware.

    I actually like the Weaver mounting system. It is one of the strongest and simplest. When coupled with quality all-steel rings like the Burris Z-ring or Millett Crosloc ring on a non-dovetailed receiver they are actually quite nice. Even the Weaver rings, although unattractive and made of two different metals, are strong and dependable. Provided you can tighten your scope down without it rolling in the rings. But Weaver rings and bases just don't belong on a Sako Tapered Dovetail.
     
  13. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    I understand...but when using a big scope the height problem is no longer a handicap, quite the opposite....although I prefer the Talley slip-on Sako bases to the Weavers...and they look good. To me. I have used Talleys to get the right height I needed for a big scope, even though I have more sets of old original Sako rings of various types and heights than I can use. I do usually use Sako rings, although not the Optilock.

    The one thing I really like about using the old Sako rings is that often they can be found in 26mm and I can then use some of my stash of older 26mm Swarovki and Schmidt&Bender scopes. One of my brightest, sharpest scopes is an old 26mm steel body 4X Swarovski Habicht...the clarity and color are remarkable. There have been several people who wouldn't believe me, until they looked through it. Yet it is so old that Swarovski told me based on the serial number that the warranty has expired and they will not service it. Not that it needs any "service".
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017

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