Looking for an L57 stock

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Sako parts' started by Joseph Lampasona Jr, Mar 22, 2019.

  1. Joseph Lampasona Jr

    Joseph Lampasona Jr Member

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    Looking for a stock for an L57 in .308

     

  2. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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  3. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Caliber doesn't matter with the stock but configuration does. Varmint barrel or sporter? I assume, as it's a 308, that it is a sporter. If you have the old stock you can have it duplicated from a stock blank from the wood of your choice. Good luck!!
     
  4. Joseph Lampasona Jr

    Joseph Lampasona Jr Member

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    I looked there’s nothing
     
  5. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Actually, caliber does matter in matching a stock. I don't know about the L57 specifically, but some stocks made for .243 lack provision for a crossbolt, while those for the harder-recoiling .308 have the crossbolt. I have owned a couple of L579 rifles in .243, and they did not have crossbolts. If I were looking for a replacement stock for a .308 rifle, I would want to be sure it had a crossbolt. Alternatively, a gunsmith could fit the crossbolt from the old stock, but that could get expensive.
     
  6. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The L579 in 308 Win had crossbolt recoil lugs, but the L57 did not. So, caliber is irrelevant. The OP will know for sure by looking at his damaged stock. The crossbolt is totally unnecessary for the recoil of a 308 Win anyway, as evidence by the endless thousands of rifles chambered for it that have no crossbolt. If I needed a stock for any Sako in 308 & found one without the crossbolt, I would not hesitate for a minute to buy it.
     
  7. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    There is a l579 on Ebay that might fit. Auction is over $250 now and could go higher.

    rick
     
  8. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The L57 stock had a deeper mag well & different bottom metal than the L579. They could be modified by a skilled stockmaker to work, but would probably be cost prohibitive.
     
  9. Joseph Lampasona Jr

    Joseph Lampasona Jr Member

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    It seems everywhere I look they have them for 579s and not 57s
     
  10. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    There were far more L579's made than L57's, and more recently. The transition from L57 to L579 took place more than 50 years ago, so finding L57 parts is going to be challenging. The most likely source for a stock would be either NOS parts in somebody's back room, or a takeoff from a custom rifle. Given the time elapsed and the scarcity of the L57, it may be a long search. You might be able to find an old Fajen semifinished blank, but then of course you'd either have to fit and finish it yourself or pay somebody to do it - and good custom stockmakers don't work cheap.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
  11. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Here's a thought - one version of the Coltsman was made on an L57 action. The longer version of the Coltsman used an FN Mauser action, but a stock for a .243 or .308 Coltsman would at least add another option to the search. Of course, you'd have to be absolutely sure the stock was for a Sako-Coltsman and not an FN-Coltsman.
     
    Joseph Lampasona Jr likes this.
  12. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Hi again Joe,

    Check out my post ……. Sako l579 22-250 Stock Needed on the forum. I went through a lot of strife just trying to get stock for my L579 rig and finally got lucky after many months of searching.

    Recently I came up with four Bofors barrels that are all marked Forester that I intended to use on another L579 receiver that I picked up. Of the four only two have the same threads. I'm working to fit them to the receiver and at the end of the day if everything goes well I'll end up with a .243 and .308 interchangeable barrel set.

    I lucked out and got a very nice L579 stock off of Ebay and the fit was perfect.

    I hope you are able to come up with a stock for your project. All I can say is be patient and keep looking.

    rick
     
  13. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    To put what you are up against in perspective, just a little over 10,000 L57 actions were ever produced. Of those many were assembled into rifles & sold by other companies like Colt, Westernfield, etc. Then take into account the Varmint & Mannlincher stocked ones & we have probably only a few thousands stocks like you are looking for that were ever made. Considering that 99.9% of those stocks are already holding a barreled action, finding one is kinda like hitting the lottery. You could probably part out your barreled action & use those funds to purchase a complete rifle, like another L57 or a L579, more economically than any option you pursue acquiring a stock. Parts for the L57 are extremely scarce. Having a custom stock made would be $700 to $1000. Just food for thought.
     
  14. Joseph Lampasona Jr

    Joseph Lampasona Jr Member

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    Yeah I figured that but the story behind the rifle I have is pretty odd. I work at a recycle plant and the rifle cane across the line with construction debris. At first I thought it was a BB gun and I almost let it pass me then i picket it up and seen what it was and the action and barrel were in mint condition minus a little rust on the trigger guard. The only problem was that the machine that picks up the debris cracked the stock in half right behind the action. And I would love to fix it just because of the story that comes with it.
     
  15. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The stock can be repaired. It may not be cosmetically perfect, but it would be functional. If all the wood is still there the crack can end up not being all that noticeable, if repaired professionally.
     
  16. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    Agree 100%,

    As you’ve stated, if you have two halves that still interconnect, a successful repair can be accomplished. If it splintered and pieces went flying then that’s a more difficult if not impossible challenge.

    Some of the two part resins once cured are actually stronger than the wood itself. I repaired a Kimber Super America stock which was driven over. It hadn’t quite snapped in two, but was hangin on by a mere thin strip of wood. I also did a Model 70 which was broke completely in two. Both rifles are still in use today. The Model 70 required pinning but it worked out fine. Both stocks were stress tested, then wrapped and shot from a lead sled as a cautionary measure.

    I’ve repaired several garden variety cracks over the years within the wrist area of rifles as well as shotguns.

    It helps to be set up properly with some bar clamps and some wooden double screw clamps. In my opinion proper clamping is mandatory as it really forces the two halves to marry together, and this also can assist in hiding the break to a point, especially if the stock is then refinished .

    Good luck to ya.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2019
  17. Joseph Lampasona Jr

    Joseph Lampasona Jr Member

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    No it is completely cracked into multiple pieces it was picked up by a claw and crushed. Way beyond repairable. And I don’t have the other half
     

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  18. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    That’s too bad Joseph. I’da had you send it to me if it was a candidate. At least you have a pattern. Try Macon-Bishop in Missouri. They show an L-57 for $175.00. I think it’s a basic inlet, but it is an option.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
  19. Joseph Lampasona Jr

    Joseph Lampasona Jr Member

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    Thanks!
     
  20. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    From the shape of the forend tip, the type of front sight, the shape of the checkering panel & from what I think is a barrel band rear sight, I don't think that was a Sako built rifle. It's more than likely one of the proprietary rifles built by another company on a Sako L57 action. Pics of the barrel stampings would help determine what it was.
     

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