Long stocked mannlicher??

Discussion in 'Sako Mannlichers and Carbines' started by ardeekay, Dec 25, 2017.

  1. ardeekay

    ardeekay Active Member

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  2. ardeekay

    ardeekay Active Member

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    Hi... I just put 2 pics of the stock, you will note that there is no 'verticle line' its the configuration of the walnut... I never took pics of the bbl. channel when I had it apart, but surely would have noticed a 'line' there. The pics show a dent on each side that I steamed out.. both came out great.. Bob
     
  3. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for posting better photos, which make it clear that the stock is one piece, and from the checkering and other features I have no doubt it is a factory Sako product. Very interesting, I'd love to have one like it. To my eyes it is better looking than the normal Sako with a barrel band. Hopefully you are not in a place where the climate (very wet or very dry) promotes stock warping. I think the reason Sako and others have done a lot of jointed full-length stocks is that it reduces that chances that warpage from radical humidity changes could affect the barrel channel. I've had that kind of problem with a number of rifles having conventional stocks. I've lost track of how many times I've refloated the barrel on my Krico. Fortunately none of my full-stock Sakos seems to have succumbed. Stock warping is a problem in Arizona because of the very dry air.
     
  4. ardeekay

    ardeekay Active Member

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    That is true... I've had many rifles, ( wood stocked) that would shoot 1/2 inch groups.... dead nuts on at 100 yds,... a year later still a half incher, but off to the right or left up or down somewhere... the answer is radical free-floating that I don't like to do. Right now my #1 hunting rifle is a Tikka Hunter, walnut stocked, that does that, but once I sight it in is good for a few months.. I believe that the full stocked Sako's with that barrel length, and stocked the way mine was, is a European only offering, I think the rifle came from a USA serviceman that was in Turkey for a long time, he might have gotten it there (PX..) I knew a guy.. that knew a guy.. that had one in .243.. and he would not.. for any $$ part with it, I also heard that it was so-so accuracy wise.. but good enough for Wisc. woods hunting... ardeekay
     
  5. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Everything in your post is consistent with my experience. I have a full-length, full-stock L579 in .308 with a Balvar 8 in a Kuharsky mount. Accuracy is not target grade and the external scope adjustment is kind of a PITA, but I enjoy shooting it and, of course, it is quite a rare gun (much more so than the .243). I think I see five L579's in .243 for every .308. That applies to sporters, Mannlicher carbines, Mannlicher long rifles, whatever. I've owned carbines in both calibers. The .243 was a tack driver but I'm not a great fan of the caliber so I sold it. The .308 went to a buddy of mine who really wanted it and I needed the money at the time. It was kind of beat up but it shot fine and I've regretted selling it ever since. The same guy also bought my Sauer 200 in 6.5x57, which I REALLY regret selling. C'est la vie, at least I had the pleasure of owning and shooting it.
     
  6. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    The J.P. Sauer's are real sleepers. I've got sporter 200's in .270, .25-06 and .30-06. The .270 has exceptional wood and the .25-06 is really, really accurate. I've also got a couple of LUX mdl 90's, one in .243 and one in .270. Those I have NIB and are super nice, both built in September 1996.

    DeerGoose
     

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