Loads for Rihiimaki Vixen Sporter .223

Discussion in 'Hand loading your Sako' started by magothy1, Apr 30, 2020.

  1. magothy1

    magothy1 Member

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    Looks like I have one of these coming my way. Serial number is 1440xx. Any suggestions on what bullets/weights to start with, powders, OAL ? If it shoots as well as my L61R .25-06 I'll be extremely happy. Googling around it seems most folks say it's accurate. Thanks.

     

  2. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    You might check to make sure it isn't a 222 Remington, I am not aware of Sako making a 223 in a L46. Make sure it's not a L469 either as that would be 222 magnum. A 223 won't fit in a 222 remington magazine either. You should probably check all those things to make sure just what it is that you have...
     
  3. sraaw

    sraaw Well-Known Member

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    With a serial number in the 144000 range I would expect it to be a L461 rather than a L46 which is usually referred to as "Rihiimaki".
     
  4. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    L461 for sure. Start with 52 grain bullets and under. That twist will like the lighter slugs. 50 grain flat base if you have some.
     
  5. magothy1

    magothy1 Member

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    L461 it is, sorry for the confusion, thanks for the help.
     
  6. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Nah. Sako .223's shoot conventional bullets of up to (at least) 64 grains just fine. Some sources list their twist as 1-12", but the one of my two which I've actually measured is closer to 1-13". Regardless, your new rifle is just as likely to shoot 60 grainers as well as it does 40 grainers. My go-to load in the .223 I've owned the longest is with a 55 grain Sierra. I've tried some 60 grain Ballistic Tips (a rather long bullet due to its hollow nose cavity, polymer tip, solid base of jacket material, and slight boattail) which shoot groups similar to any lighter bullets I've used.

    You may very well find that some lighter bullet shoots the most accurately in your rifle, but it will be other factors than twist which are of greater influence on the accuracy. Simply use whatever bullet best suits the game or target you're after and exhibits good accuracy.
     
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  7. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    No one can predict how any particular bullet will shoot based solely on the twist rate. As long as the twist & velocity are adequate to stabilize the bullet, other factors have more influence on accuracy. Stonecreek has offered sound advice. You shouldn't have too much difficulty finding several accurate bullet/powder combinations. My AI Varmint shoots everything from 40 to 60 grainers very well.
     
  8. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Well I guess I should have said "don't grab any 68-72 grain" that you see for those black rifles. Sorry for even bringing up the dreaded "twist rate".
     
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  9. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    Exactly, I have a Bofors deluxe in 222 magnum and it won't shoot anything over a 40 grain bullet worth a damn. It has been my experience that fast twist does make a difference and anyone that thinks you can't over stabilize a bullet with fast twist is mistaken. I have not seen in any of my rifles a true cross-over that would allow a fast twist to work with light (40-50 grain) bullets.

    I bought a new model 85 Varmint with 1/8 twist and I can shoot a 55 grain V-Max extremely well in it, but forget the 40 and 50 grain bullets. I have a Wilson combat AR-15, an extremely well made rifle with 1/7 and you are wasting your time with anything under 55 grains hitting a barn.

    I will admit, I have only listed any information from my own shooting and not reading about it on the Internet. I believe that the Internet has done more for mis-information than the Democratic party. I know I am just another voice in the wilderness, but what I am relationg is from personal experience and testing dozens of Sakos over dozens of years and 10's of thousands of rounds shot at varmints and plenty others in magazine articles as we have done some extensive shooting there too.

    If I was a betting man, I would say that the 223 will shoot 40 grain V-Max bullets extremely well with H335 powder, regardless of what others may say about the temperature instability of H335 powder is. I have shot tons of H335 and never had the problem that many say you will get with it. This is a picture of just the H335 powder and 22 caliber V-Max bullets I keep handy to shoot in my Sako rifles...

    thumbnail_IMG_9669.jpg
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    "Temperature stability" and "twist" -- two currently popular hobgoblins among shooting writers who have little else to write about and marketers whose commercial successes depend on casting a pall of obsolescence on anything made "last year".

    H335 is simply the commercial canister grade of WC844 -- and WC844 is the powder formulated specifically for the 5.56 Nato, otherwise known as the .223 Remington. I suspect that since the military expects its ammunition to perform appropriately in every imaginable condition that "temperature stability" ain't much of an issue with WC844/H335.
     
  11. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Temp stability is a known fact in high volume cases with certain powders, RL 26 for one. Maybe not so much in the 223. Hobgoblins and t___t in the same sentence, shame on you.
     

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