L57 Trigger Adjustment

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by douglastwo, Aug 22, 2021.

  1. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    I've not been able to find written instructions on how to adjust an L57 trigger. I've attached a scan of a page from my 1958 and 1960 FI catalogs that show the trigger, but without instructions. I've been studying an L57 trigger to determine how it adjusts and it seems to be different than a #4 trigger. On a #4 trigger the top screw (B) will adjust the pull and the screw directly under it (E) is used to adjust backlash. Of course lock nut (A) has to be loosened to adjust (B).

    The L57 trigger has 2 screws that are visible on the top picture (with the blue background) Sako L57 Trigger.jpg of the scan. If I loosen the top screw (the one closest to the bolt) it will slamfire for me. If I reposition the top screw to its original location and adjust the screw under it in or out, it increases or decreases the amount of pull respectively, and I cannot make it slamfire. This seems to be the correct way to adjust the L57 trigger, but before I do it to the actual L57 I want to adjust from a 5lb. pull to a 3lb., I'd appreciate input from you guys. I want to be correct.

     

  2. marlin92

    marlin92 Well-Known Member

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  3. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, that looks like a #4 trigger. Here's a picture of the trigger on my L57. It's somewhat different than the #4. The brown color on the lock nut is not rust, it's some type of coating to keep it from loosening.
    L57 Trigger.JPG
     
  4. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure your screws "should" adjust the same as the standard #4 trigger.

    I'd remove the upper screw/nut, to check for the proper spring and it's condition.
    The lower screw appears to be too far into it's threaded hole. I'd remove and check it also.

    So.......yes......the upper screw is weight of pull.....and, the lower screw is overtravel.

    Hope this helps.
     
  5. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Kevin. It helps because you convinced me I need to check it more. One thing that's hard to notice in the picture is that the lock nut is in contact with the overtravel screw and as a matter of fact the nut covers up almost 1/2 of the overtravel screw and you cannot backout the screw anymore unless you remove the lock nut and not use it. I found a couple of pictures online of my L57 trigger and they all had the lock nut. Needless to say, I'm somewhat confused by the fact that the screw we feel should be for overtravel will adjust the pull. More inspection work needed!
     
  6. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    OK, guys maybe I've figured out my trigger problem. I've attached a marked up drawing of a #4 trigger because I do not have a drawing of an L57 trigger. I removed the 2 screws from my 57 trigger and my parts are clean and in good condition, and they look just like the 2 I've marked in red on the drawing of the #4 trigger. When I did that, my trigger now moves like it is pinned of course, BUT it acts like the spring that positions the trigger must be missing because the trigger moves freely like it has no spring to position it when the rifle is bolted. I haven't removed the pins holding the trigger and spring in place because I'd rather not do that until I have a spring ready to install. Please speak up, do you think this is my problem? I'm at a lose as to what else it could be. And can one of you nice guys sell me a spring for my L57?
    CCI_000012.jpg
     
  7. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Soon as I hit send, I'm thinking (dangerous yes?) the pin holding the spring behind the trigger means that spring should have no effect on the trigger. So I guess I'm still at a lost of what's causing my problem. I'd go straight to a gunsmith if I could find one that is experienced on Sako L57. But so far they have all told me they have never worked on a 57.
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Don: It may be that there is crud gumming up the interior trigger works. I'd suggest removing the trigger from the action and soaking it in naphtha or some similar solvent overnight, then drying it well and re-installing it. The weight-of-pull screw and overtravel screw should work just like on a #4 trigger, the primary difference being that the L57 trigger has no integral safety.
     
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  9. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    There is nothing special or more complicated about a L57 trigger. Any competent gunsmith should be able to fix your problem. I just cleaned up a #4 trigger for a friend that bought one of the Sako Mausers on the North Dakota auction. It was so gunked up inside that it would not function. Slam fired every time you closed the bolt & safety wouldn't move. Cleaned all the hardened oil out of it & it functioned perfectly. I think Stonecreek may be on the right path.
     
  10. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    If you are missing a spring, Brownells has a pack of generic springs of various sizes that can be cut to length. It has saved my bacon several times when irreplaceable small springs were missing or lost from various guns. A Tikka magazine latch spring and the safety detent spring on a Sako #4 trigger come to mind.

    And all of my experience agrees with what Paulson just said about gunk in trigger mechanisms. I've fixed more than one with a simple cleaning.
     
  11. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    I highly doubt that the rear internal spring is missing, as both it and the trigger sear are captured by two housing cross pins.
    Broken??....never seen it.
    Gunked-up??......possibly.

    To check the trigger sear spring:

    Remove the bolt.

    While pulling the trigger(with about 5 pounds of pressure)........push down on the top of the trigger sear(where it protrudes through the receiver tang) with about 10 pounds of thumb pressure.
    You should feel a very smooth vertical movement of about 1/4 inch. Since the sear is closely fitted to the trigger housing, "gunking" around it can easily happen.

    Did you remove/inspect the small spring behind the poundage screw/nut? Sometimes I need a fine dental pick to fish one out of the threaded hole. If, for some reason, the small spring has fallen inside the housing..........the trigger lever must be removed to fish it out.

    Hope this helps...........if not, just pm me.....I'm only about 150 miles up the highway from ya. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2021
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  12. Bucktote

    Bucktote Well-Known Member

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    Hello fellow Sako guys!!
    I see where advice is given about cleaning the trigger assy in a hi end solvent. I do not see any anything about lubrication a trigger assy. The gunsmith in Savannah says they need fine oiling ??? Can you advise ? B/T
     
  13. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I would say use synthetic lubricants only, or maybe graphite. Anything petroleum based will sooner or later deteriorate into sticky gunk. Rem Oil and 3-in-1 are especially notorious. I'm partial to Break Free CLP, which is Teflon in a synthetic carrier that does not leave any residue. It was developed for the military for use in machine guns.
     
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  14. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the input. I'm still de-gunking it and I am making headway. I'll give an update in a day or so.
     
  15. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I can't see any reason to oil a trigger. The tiny surfaces that are in contact are highly polished & any lubrication is not going to affect function, Periodic inspect for corrosion would be prudent, but any oils applied should be use sparingly & judiciously. Excessive lubrication is the main reason people have problems with triggers. Just my opinion based on experience "fixing" triggers for many years.
     
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  16. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I agree, but the various parts should have a coating of something to retard rust, and the trigger pivot, etc. should have a drop of lubricant. The sear surfaces, of course, do not require lubrication - it would be gone after a couple of firings anyway. An open trigger mechanism is easier to deal with than an enclosed one like the Sako #4. Another point to consider is the interface between the bolt body and the cocking piece. I just worked on a newly purchased Sako that had a noticeable delay between the trigger pull and the click of the striker. Lubricating the bearing surface between the bolt body and the cocking piece restored proper operation.
     
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  17. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Petroleum-based solvents leave a slightly oily coat behind. I would think that a naphtha soak would leave enough in the way of petro molecules on the trigger surfaces to prevent rust or corrosion without serving as a "glue" for potential contaminants like lint or dust. But something like Break Free CLP might be useful.
     
  18. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    I don't have any CLP. But I have a can of Tetra Gun spray that says it's a fast evaporating Fluoropolymer that cleans, lubricates and protects. The can says it contains Methylene Chloride, Isobutane and Propane. Sounds like an flame thrower to me. I've never used it, but it was given to me by a good friend saying it is, to quote him, good stuff. I consider him a very knowledgeable gun guy. Any of you ever heard of Tetra or have any experience with it?
     
  19. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Methylene Chloride was the major ingredient in most paint strippers until it was recently banned by the Feds. I wouldn't use anything with methylene chloride in it anywhere near wood finish or any kind of plastic. Liquid propane would be the fast-evaporating carrier, but of course the stuff is highly flammable. But then, so is hair spray.
     
  20. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    I figured it would play heck with plastic and wood finish, that's why I never used it. I agree with Paulson, I use lubricate very sparingly. I spray a very small amount on a soft cloth and wipe the visible metal and wood being careful to not leave any visible oil. Then I use a toothpick or Q-tip to apply a little oil on metal bearing points. Guns that get used in the rain or that sweat due to being moved in and out of hot and cold environments, I tear down as soon as hunting season is over and do a good cleaning.
     

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