Just Started Refinishing My Stock

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by vitaminj22, May 20, 2011.

  1. vitaminj22

    vitaminj22 Member

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    I thought that some of you might find this helpful



    I recently picked up an old Sako L579 for dirt cheap.
    The stock had been refinished 30 years ago with some sort of varnish/lacquer that was gooped and brushed on. Looking at the stock, you could see that the dents and gouges did were in the lacquer, not the wood.
    Here are some pictures before any work was started
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    I used Citristrip to remove all of the original finish. You can buy it at Home Depot or Wally World. It literally took five minutes and it turned the lacquer into a gel.
    I put the gun in the sink and used warm water to rinse it all off.
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    There weren't too many dents in the stock. I used the wet rag and iron trick to raise any dents.
    The grain was pretty bland and didn't have much character. I did a little research on enhancing the grain in wood and settled on Bone Black from midway
    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/default.aspx?productNumber=326899
    I mixed this with Birchwood Grain filler and sealer and worked it into the entire stock. I little of the bone black goes a long way.
    I was a little nervous because it literally turned my entire stock BLACK. It looked like I got a rattle can and just sprayed the whole thing.
    I let it dry for a couple of hours and them sanded it down to bare wood again. This didn't take too long at all. I started with 220 and it made quick work the the whole thing. I then hit it with 400, then 600.
    At this point most of the grain and filled and it was amazing how much "character" the bone black added to the stock.
    I wanted ALL of the grain filled so I repeated. At this point the difference was night and day.
    I blew out all of the dust and wiped it down with mineral spirits.
    I then applied 2 coats of the Birchwood Sealer and filler, with and of the Bone Black.
    After doing this I used 0000 steel wool and lightly went over the entire stock.
    This process was quick because I spent alot of prep time and sanding time previously.
    After the Sealer and Filler was dried I started with the Truoil.
    I spent a little extra time with the initial prep and I saw beautiful results within the first 2 coats. My stock didn't soak in the truoil as I have seen in some of the other stocks.
    Some far I have put 15 or so coats on and I plan on doing another 50.
    Here are my results so far
    After 5 coats......
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    after 15 coats......
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    I am well pleased with the results so far. The difference is night and day from what I started with.
    I think that the Bone Black was key to this whole thing. I just wanted to share what I did in order to enhance the grain. It turned an ordinary piece of wood into a pretty damn nice piece of wood.
    I am planning on finishing this gloss. After I am done I will sand it with 2000 grit and then a pumice. I will probably use the Birchwood Sheen conditioner and then wax it.
    Let me know what you think
     

  2. stoneybroke

    stoneybroke Well-Known Member

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    I'll be refinishing two old sako stocks this year. Both are pretty plain, so the use of Bone Black got my attention. Can you tell what proportion was used with the Bone Black? Have you ever used this product on a checkered stock?
     
  3. vitaminj22

    vitaminj22 Member

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    The ratio was approx 7 to 1 ( 7 parts filler to 1 part BB). All I did was start mixing the black with the filler until I got a deep, rich color. The bone black and the filler goes a long, long way so don't mix up too much.
    I refinish a Rem 700 that had checkering. I used a tooth brush to get all of the old finish out of the checkering. You have to be a little careful with the Truoil in the checkering. I applied with much lighter in the checkered areas. I also diluted the truoil with mineral spirts to do the checkering (ratio 2:2)
    By diluting it and applying it separately from the rest of the stock, I was able to control how much was applied to the checkering a little better. You can also add more so start off with just a tad
     
  4. vitaminj22

    vitaminj22 Member

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    I would also not use the bone black in the checkering. I don't think that you will be able to sand it all out and it will look unnatural. I would just enhance the grain in the rest of the stock and leave the checking alone.
     
  5. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    Stoneybroke- Amazing transformation. A bit like a toad to a prince. I do like the effect you got from the "boneblack". I don't think it would be good for every application but it was very good for this one. Congrats, Misako
     
  6. Bob M.

    Bob M. Member

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    Why am I not seeing the photos? There is a box telling me the photo is not found...
    Thanks,
    Bob M.
     

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