Interesting Early Sako Military Rifle

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by kirkbridgershooters, Apr 30, 2017.

  1. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I was just looking through Gunbroker ads and saw this gun. Maybe just right for the discriminating buyer...

    http://www.gunbroker.com/item/640127453

     

  2. terenceh

    terenceh Member

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    I was fortunate to handle one of these Sako Mosins recently at the UK Royal Armouries during a lecture on WW II sniper rifles. It was part of the UK National Firearms Collection (which used to be known as the Enfield Pattern Room before it was relocated to Leeds, Yorkshire) and although I can't recall the (pre-war) year of manufacture, I did note that the receiver was particularly highly polished and blued for a military rifle. The action was also much smoother than regular Mosins.
     
  3. arthur36

    arthur36 Well-Known Member

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    These have a reputation for accuracy. There was a glut of them being offered by the various surplus dealers ten or so years ago. I thought about getting one then, but the un-issued 8mm Yugoslav Mauser's cost less, and since I was already into 8mm, I wasn't interested in yet another caliber. If it goes for the current bid, I think its a good deal, providing the bore is good. I'm trying to remember, someone correct me please, I believe a large group of these - the early ones- were built on Mosin-Nagant model 91 receivers, and some of them will have rounded receiver rings and some will be hexagonal.
     
  4. Coyote Down

    Coyote Down Well-Known Member

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  5. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    I didn't get the part about no FFL
     
  6. marlin92

    marlin92 Well-Known Member

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    Wonder if the seller means he doesn't have an FFL so check that your FFL dealer will accept shipment from a non FFL - only thing I can think of
     
  7. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    That works. It was just a little puzzling.
     
  8. marlin92

    marlin92 Well-Known Member

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    Just saw in the ad description he said " Built on an 1896 IZHEVSK receiver " so I guess that is what his reasoning is. Prior to now I just looked at the title saying 1942 M39

     
  9. iwanna

    iwanna Well-Known Member

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    That is interesting. I just looked at the rifle.
     
  10. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Since ATF considers the receiver date to be the date of the gun, a Finnish Mosin built on an antique receiver can legitimately be shipped to a non-FFL holder, assuming his state of residence also permits it. No problem where I live, but if you're in New Jersey or some other anti-gun state, better check local laws before ordering. Checking for receiver dates is quite common in the world of Mosin Nagant collecting, since an antique receiver saves the transaction cost of going through a dealer.

    I have quite a few military rifles built by Sako, which was originally an arms company owned by the Finnish Civil Guard (Suojeluskunta). Ownership was transferred to the Finnish Red Cross around 1945, and it was later spun off as an independent corporation. The Finnish Model 39 was one of the most accurate general-issue military rifles ever built. The standard of acceptance was around 1 MOA accuracy.
     
    deergoose likes this.

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