Inherited my new sako.

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by IdahoGuy, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. IdahoGuy

    IdahoGuy Member

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    New to here and have an interesting gun in my collection. I'm a avid target shooter and love to shoot and collect firearms. This rifle however sits way back on the safe due to its beauty and serial number... It's a riihimaki 222 mannlicher I inherited from my father. He's not around to tell me about it but I know he had it prior to the 90s and wasn't into buying, let alone keeping an "illegal" firearm. I do however think he might have traveled out of the USA with this rifle possibly to hunt. So the serial number has been literally ground down horribly by either the worst gunsmith or my idea a customs and border officer possibly? It has been restamped with the serial number but to me looks more like a date then a serial number. My father would have had this rifle repaired by a professional if there was something wrong with it, which leads me to think there is a interesting history to it. I've attached a few pics. The serial number picture has the final number edited out but is a 5 digit serial. Any thoughs questions or answers would be appreciated. Should I get the Sako signature and factory dates? Why would anyone ruin the receiver so bad and the restamped the numbers like a date? The gun shoots amazing and is 95%+ in my opinion. 20181208_210709.jpg

     

  2. marlin92

    marlin92 Well-Known Member

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    Ouch - I can think of only one reason to do what was done to the serial and that is because of theft and the desire to not get caught red handed with the goods. Not sure of the legalities of owning it or beginning to verify the serial number.
     
  3. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Never seen anything like this. I agree with Marlin it had to be stolen. What a waste!
     
  4. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I second what marlin92 said about the serial number being ground off to keep it from being identified because it was stolen at one time. To defaced a serial number or possess a gun that is defaced is a crime in the USA, so I doubt any government official or gunsmith would do such a thing. It' s anybody's guess what the numbers are that were restamped, but until I checked with the BATF about it's validity, I would not purchase a rifle so marked. Unfortunately, that number may be useless for a Factory Records Search unless it can be proven that it was restamped to match the original. However, you could find out what Sako left the factory with that number & if it is a Model L46 Mannlincher in 222 Rem it "could" be it was recovered from the theft & restamp with it's original SN. IMHO, the rifle has lost any collector value, but would make a fine shooter. BTW, Riihimaki is the town the Sako plant is located in, not a model designation.
     
  5. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    What number is on the bolt handle stem?
     
  6. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    I would piece it out. Strip it all down and sell all the metal pieces separate except for the action. Then you have the stock and butt plate to sell also.

    I'm sure people here would be interested.

    But to get the most out of it, sell in pieces, not as a package.
     
  7. IdahoGuy

    IdahoGuy Member

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    Yeah I wish my father would have talked to me more about his gun collection. The fact that it does have a serial makes me want to look into it further. It looks like something a police seizure would do though by such a horrible restamp. I'll get the factory records for this serial number and see where that leads. Follow up when I get the news.
     
  8. IdahoGuy

    IdahoGuy Member

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  9. IdahoGuy

    IdahoGuy Member

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    If it goes that way and this site allows selling I would glady get it to the great sako collectors around here.
     
  10. IdahoGuy

    IdahoGuy Member

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    Wow! There it is. Original stamp. Its the same serial number
     
  11. IdahoGuy

    IdahoGuy Member

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    So stolen and defaced by a theif. Then recovered and restamped? I wish I knew the story behind this gun.
     
  12. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    If you can post a picture of the serial number on the bolt handle. We'll be able to see if its an original one or not.
     
  13. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    A very interesting situation. It would appear that the serial number on the receiver was destroyed, then restamped to match that on the bolt. But who is to say that the bolt is original to the gun? All a request for factory records can tell you is when, to whom shipped, and what kind of gun bore that serial number. The records cannot verify whether the serial number is original to the rifle -- except to determine if the rifle which originally bore that number was of the same caliber and configuration (Mannlicher .222 in this instance). If of the same caliber and configuration, then that would be fairly good evidence that the serial number is original to the rifle.

    The legalities here are a little hazy. The act of destroying the serial number would have been illegal. Restoring the original serial number would presumably be legal and proper. The rub comes in demonstrating that the person possessing it did not commit the crime of destroying the serial number and that the number has been legitimately restored. If we assuming it was stolen, defaced, then recovered, I suspect that some documentation from law enforcement chronicled the chain of events of the serial number restoration so that it could be returned to its owner and legally possessed. That documentation, if it existed, is probably permanently misplaced.

    By the way, the practice Sako makes of also numbering the underside of the bolt may have played a significant role in its recovery and return (if that is indeed what occurred).
     

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