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Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by Vernon Bronkhorst, May 16, 2018.

  1. Vernon Bronkhorst

    Vernon Bronkhorst Member

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    Hi,

    Is there anyone here who has experience with Norma African PH ammo. My question actually is - I own a L61R Finbear in .375H&H. It was the first rifle that I bought. This was wayback in 1991. The rifle belonged to my grand father, who bought it new, and never actually shot with it. When he bought it, he bought a packet of ammo with it, and from that packet were 6 rounds missing, so one can say I basically bought a new second hand rifle! :) I have used it a lot more, and I mean a lot more! I generally shoot 270gr and 300gr. I don't reload myself, and to date I have not had any problems with groupings or miss fires as I use only top brands and premium class ammo. I now have the opportunity to go and hunt a Cape Buffolo, something I am looking forward to. I am looking at ammo for this hunt, and as I am sure that a 300gr will do the job just fine, I am contemplating to go with a 350gr solid. Norma African PH makes a .375 round with a 350gr Woodleigh solid. My question is, will my rifle be able to handle that extra power. I know Sako is a very good designed weapon, and when it was new I would not have thought about it to load the round and pull that trigger. But the rifle is not "todays child" anymore, and eventhough the bolt and receiver still feels solid after these years, one does have to think about the little extra pressure that comes with that round. Is there maybe someone on the forum that have some input to help me decide as what to do.

     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Your Sako should handle any factory ammunition just fine.

    The pressure generated by a particular factory load is not related to the weight of the bullet. The pressure is controlled by the manufacturer to fall within the standards adopted by SAAMI (American) or CIP (European), the industry organizations which promulgate standards for guns and ammunition. A load with a 270 grain bullet may actually generate nominally more pressure than one with a 350 grain bullet, but both will be within the pressure limits for a .375 H&H.

    Also, the age of your Sako (which is almost "new" compared to many owned by folks on this forum) has nothing to do with its strength. The content and temper of its steel, regardless of the number of rounds through it, will still be amply strong when your great-great-great grandchildren are taking weekend vacations to other solar systems through wormholes.
     
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  3. Vernon Bronkhorst

    Vernon Bronkhorst Member

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    Thank you. I know this, but you know that little devil on the shoulder thing. One needs to make sure! Great feedback!
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    There is one precaution you should take: Generally speaking, the heavier the bullet the greater the recoil. Improperly tightened action screws can allow a heavy-recoiling rifle to crack its stock, particularly behind the tang. Be sure your front action screw is as tight as reasonably possible, and that your rear action screw is "snug", but not over-tight.

    Wood stocks shrink and swell with changes in humidity and temperature, and they also shrink a bit with age. Failure to keep the action screws tight can lead not only to degraded accuracy but to cracked stocks.
     
  5. 375H&Hrifleman

    375H&Hrifleman Member

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    In my experience anything Norma has been high quality. There is an opinion among some who have hunted your cape buffalo,that if not riled up, start with a bonded expander and follow with solids. A friend of mine was just in your country and took his with one front and center just under the horn bosses. Dropped like a stone! Good hunting Vernon!
     

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