I just saw this "Legendary Historical Models"

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by waterwolf, Apr 30, 2021.

  1. waterwolf

    waterwolf Well-Known Member

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    Sako showroom

     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Very interesting. Thanks for sharing. The comments on the L61R say it has a "two-baffled muzzle brake" but it is not visible in the picture. Several other comments about other rifles shown sound kind of odd, like things were confused or "lost" in translation to English. So not quite sure what to make of the "factory" muzzle brake statement as I have never seen a "two-baffle" muzzle brake on any rifle, let alone a Sako.
     
  3. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    The English translations on the classic rifle descriptions are pretty shaky, including the reference to a "two-baffle muzzle brake." The description of the L46 has some howlers, including a reference to a "detachable machine" (magazine) and calling the Sako dovetail scope mount a "trademark binocular mount that widens forward." I'm surprised as I'm sure Sako has some excellent English speakers on staff.
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Indeed they do. But it sounds like the translation was done by some website contractor who simply typed the Finnish text into Google Translate and let that be good enough.

    Translation programs are amazingly good -- much better than linguists ever thought they could be -- and getting better every day as they "learn" more and more dialect and even slang. However, such programs are adapted to "every day" conversation rather than the technical jargon of any particular subject area, so you get translations like a gun barrel being a "pipe", or a gun's action being a "lock". Nevertheless, if you know what to expect you can pretty much make out the meaning of most texts when run through a language translation program.
     

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