I am looking for a quality Sako Gunsmith in Maine.

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by bobinmaine, Jul 22, 2018.

  1. bobinmaine

    bobinmaine Member

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    I have had some issues with my 1960 L579 trigger. I would like the right smith to go over my Forester Deluxe and confirm it is in factory new safe condition. The closer to Maine the better for the Sako Smith's shop.

     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Not sure what you mean by a "Sako" gunsmith. The Sako #4 trigger in your L579 is of a basic design & similar to many other triggers. It has two adjustments, weight of pull & overtravel. The sear engagement is set at the factory & is not user adjustable. Any professional, competent smith can check & adjust your trigger or inspect it for any broken parts without being a "Sako" specialist. In fact, finding a Sako specialist might be a difficult task. The #4 trigger has limits on how low the weight of pull can be adjusted, which is "around" 2 lbs, as the safety can malfunction. It's not rocket surgery!! I would interview the smith to get an idea of his knowledge/skill level about basic trigger function & adjustment & tell him not to go below 2.5 lbs.
     
  3. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I really like a Sako trigger and have adjusted plenty myself, but what paulson says is true. The safety won't hold when the trigger gets much below 3 pounds. The best way to check is to try the safety when you have adjusted the trigger and if it doesn't slide freely on and off, yout trigger is too light and probably won't even hold when the bolt handle is closed.
     
    Jeffy1 likes this.
  4. bobinmaine

    bobinmaine Member

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    My trigger pull goes back and forth from 4 to 10lbs and sometimes the bolt on closing will decock, plus a new wrinkle, the bolt fired on closing one time. This prompted me to start the 'post'. If I can get the pull to stay at 4-5lbs, that would be just fine for me.
     
  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sounds like your trigger may be loose on its mount. The forward-most screw is the mounting screw, not an adjusting screw. It should be fully tight since it bears against the frame in order to keep the trigger stationary. Some people look at the three screws and assume that the mounting screw is also an adjustment, so they loosen it just a bit. What you get is erratic bolt sear engagement and a very dangerous situation.

    I've received Sakos in this condition a few (too many) times over the years -- and probably was able to buy them "reasonable" because the owners wanted rid of their guns with their unpredictable triggers.
     
  6. Branxhunter

    Branxhunter Well-Known Member

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    Agree with comments above - sounds like something is not adjusted right.

    Just something from left field for improving the trigger pull - take the trigger off the action and give it a good soak in a tin of petrol. Even better if it is leaded petrol, but you may not be able find any. This should dissolve out any hardened or sticky grease or oil, I have done this n my triggers and was suprised at the improvement.

    I also have fitted wider trigger shoes on a couple of my rifles and they also give the perception of a lighter trigger pull.

    Marcus
     
  7. bobinmaine

    bobinmaine Member

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    All trigger screws, 'A B C and D pictured in original owners manual', and lock nuts are now tight. I do not use oils on working parts of my rifles, due to extreme cold during Maine deer season. As soon as I find time, I will shoot 20-30 rounds to see how it goes.
     
  8. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    "B" is the weight of pull adjustment screw which pushes against a spring so it should not be screwed in "tight". "C" is the mounting screw & it should be good & tight & "D" (the lock nut) solidly tightened. You don't have to shoot it to test the trigger. In fact, beings you turned the trigger adjustment screws without having a working knowledge of how your trigger functions, it would be best if you checked the trigger WITHOUT a live round in the chamber. There are many lubricating oils available today that work fine in cold temps. Maine is not in the Arctic Circle where temps can cause problems, not only with lubes but freezing the action parts together from condensation.
     
  9. bobinmaine

    bobinmaine Member

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    Who said I have no knowledge of Sako triggers and rifles? Firstly, I have the Owners Manual. Secondly, A & B parts worked loose. Thirdly, don't take cheap shots with a Sako.
     
  10. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    If explaining how "B" worked & recommending that you check your trigger in the safest manner possible is offensive to you, I apologize as I meant no offense. Just trying to help. Is your overtravel (backlash) adjustment screw properly set or has it "worked loose" as well? Surely, the Owner's Manual will cover that.
     
  11. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    No need to get defensive, Bob, Paulson is just cautioning that it may be better to dry fire than use live ammunition in testing your trigger. I've never seen a Sako damaged by dry firing.

    The trigger instructions contained in the manual https://www.sako.fi/sites/default/files/Finnbear.pdf are rather rudimentary and don't attempt to address problems like you have encountered.

    Depending on the age of your rifle/trigger, there may be a fourth screw which is not illustrated in the manual. It is located on top of the trigger and sits between the trigger housing and the receiver when mounted. This screw controls the bolt sear engagement and can only be adjusted with the trigger dismounted, so its adjustment is necessarily by trial and error. If some Einstein decided to start adjusting this screw then your bolt sear engagement could be a real problem (Sako dropped this feature in favor of a fixed sear engagement, probably because of problems showing up in the field from people monkeying with this screw.)

    Another issue which arises is over-tightening of the overtravel screw. This can make the trigger pull very heavy simply because something has to bend in order to release the internal trigger sear. A little overtravel is better than trying to tune all of the overtravel out of the finger lever. BTW: The overtravel screw doesn't have a lock nut, so I like to use a dab of clear nail polish on it to make sure it doesn't drift.

    But perhaps the most common issue is a frozen or gummy weight-of-pull spring. Immersing the entire trigger in naphtha (or "petrol" as Branxhunter suggest) might fix that, but I'd remove the WOP screw and spring (be careful, they're small and hard to keep up with) to flush off the spring and flush out the hole it goes in.
     
  12. bobinmaine

    bobinmaine Member

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    I was not offended and I value all Members knowledge. I purchased my Sako in Deutschland in 1960 and it was probably built in 1959. I think some internal parts, trigger, may be from model 57. So I will look for the hidden screw on top of the trigger group. Thanks everyone for input. Bob.
     
  13. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The Model 57 had a completely different trigger than the L579 & none of the parts will interchange. If you find the screw on top of the trigger housing, LEAVE IT ALONE! The bolt sear engagement is set at the factory and, as Stone says, messing with it will not "improve" your trigger & only cause you more problems.
     
  14. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    There were some carry-over parts that appeared on early L579's which came from the L57's. However, the trigger is certain not to be one of them since the L57 had a rolling bolt safety not associated with the trigger while the L579 uses a sliding safety which is part of the trigger and not associated with the bolt.

    It's great that you've had your L579 all of these years. Since presumably it's been solely in your possession I'm going to guess that the trigger difficulty is associated with "crud" build up. Although you may keep the trigger parts dry and free of oil, just the tiny dust particles in the air can collect sufficiently over 50+ years to gum up the works. It's kinda like how surprised you can be when you go to re-paint the kitchen and find that the walls are all coated with grease you never knew was there.
     
  15. bobinmaine

    bobinmaine Member

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    I have used Break Free Powder Blast to clean trigger group and Blue Lock Tight on adjusting screws. Since then The L579 has preformed very well. Thank you all for good information and to you, many bulls eyes with your rifles.
     

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