Howdy folks

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by Furdown, Apr 13, 2019.

  1. Furdown

    Furdown Member

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    Longtime reader, new member
    Only have 1 Sako but want to own more. Love hunting coyotes with my forester 22-250

     

  2. Chris Anderson

    Chris Anderson Well-Known Member

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    :)
     
  3. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    The interesting thing about hunting coyotes is that, according to wildlife biologists, shooting them has no long-term effect whatsoever on the population. It seems that coyotes can be very prolific, but they adjust their breeding to the availability of territory and prey. If the coyotes in an area lose population due to hunting or other reasons, the remaining females will give birth to more pups and the next generation will re-populate. They also taste terrible (as is the case with all carnivorous mammals). I've never hunted them myself. However, I can see where it's an interesting sport to match wits with the critters and try to get close enough to shoot one. If I want to see a coyote up close and personal all I have to do is sit out in my driveway for a while, but it's illegal to fire a weapon where I live (near a high school) and you better believe all the local wildlife knows it. It's a rare day I don't see some kind of critter when I'm walking out to the mailbox. Coyotes, roadrunners (yes, I've got both in the neighborhood), rabbits, lizards, ground squirrels, the occasional bobcat, and once in a great while a rattlesnake or Gila monster.
     
  4. Furdown

    Furdown Member

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    Yes hunting coyotes is the ultimate challenge because they are so smart. There is no limit and can be legally taken year round in most states yet there is never a shortage of them and are found in all states
     
  5. sakojim

    sakojim Well-Known Member

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    Check out Wikipedia for some interesting info on Coyotes, Coywolves, Woyotes and other hybrid crosses. The history of coyote, wolf and dog hybridization has been around for more than a century. My conclusion is that the coyote and its variations can adapt to most any hardship condition and survive. The more you shoot, the quicker they reproduce. About the only controlling factor for their numbers is the lack of food. Sakojim.
     
  6. Chris Anderson

    Chris Anderson Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure match wits with the critters would accurately describe me.


    And oh do they make your heart pound when two or three of them are having a race to see who can get to that injured rabbit that's just down wind and 80 yards in front of you.


    Don't we wish that was the case for quail and (insert your favorite game species here).

    I was about 17 the first time my Dad convinced me to go out coyote hunting with him (that was back when I thought real men hunted deer and pheasants).

    We went out driving the dirt roads in the west desert and eventually stopped, walked out a ways and set out the call. Everything was quiet (except for the squawking) for a while and then you could see two coyotes coming fast from quite a ways out. The closer they got the faster they seemed to come so by the time they were inside 100 yards they were really be moving.

    Looking at them you could see that their FULL attention was on the rabbit we'd set out and they seemed like they were licking their lips.

    My dad and I got ready and, when they closed to about 40 yards, it was time to bag the first coyote of the day. Just as I was raising my rifle I got a serious case of coyote fever and missed mine by 1 1/2 miles. The thought crossed my mind, no big deal they are 30 yards away and there's no cover. They will be easy to hit. Boy was I wrong. One millisecond they were running full tilt towards us and the next millisecond they were tearing full tilt away from us.

    We tossed a couple of obligatory rounds in their direction (just to make sure they didn't turn around and attack us) then moved on to the next set.

    Fortunately my subsequent hunts went better but I'll never forget how hard my heart was beating and how bad my hands were shaking on those first coyotes. With an introduction like that who could not hunt coyotes.

    Those were the days.

    Thanks
    ChrisA
     
  7. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Active Member

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    The reproduction rates of the female is exactly what was mentioned on here. We can have a good year around here and think that they have been decimated. All the females left will have four pups the next spring. In two years we'll find we have just as many adults as in previous years. If we have poor hunting weather and the kill rate is down the females will only have one pup. You can tell by how vocal they are at night as to what numbers there are out there.
     
  8. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    I am regularly entertained at night by "coyote concerts." I live near the edge of a Federal wilderness area so they are all around me and I can hear them vocalizing in the wilderness. Sometimes the sound is so close that it seems like they are in my yard (and maybe they are, who knows?). I've thought about going out looking with my NVD but too lazy. Sometimes they will get going during the day. Just a couple of days ago I was walking out to the mailbox and I heard at least half a dozen of them harmonizing.
     

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