How tight do these screws need to be?

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks for gunsmithing your own Sako' started by Webphut, Mar 9, 2018.

  1. Webphut

    Webphut Well-Known Member

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    I installed my Canjar trigger, but am not familiar with how tight, or what torque to tighten the highlighted screws. All input would be appreciated. Thank you. IMG_0858.JPG IMG_0859.JPG

     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Torque recommendations for small screws, like those found on firearms, are worthless tidbits of trivial information. Please don't tell me you don't know how to tighten a screw. They need to be tight enough that they don't come loose. Is that so hard that you need to inquire on the internet. Do you really think there are specs out there for those specific screws that can be accessed just for you? Used to be people just grabbed a screwdriver & turned the screw in a clockwise direction. If you can't accomplish that take it to someone who can. Sorry if I sound curt, but I just am getting sick & tried of all the worthless minutia that the internet has cause to enter the firearms world. For crying out loud, can't anybody tighten a screw anymore without asking how!!!
     
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  3. Webphut

    Webphut Well-Known Member

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    I hear ya. I always seen my father use a small palm inch pound torque screwdriver on the bottom metal plate/trigger guard screws is all, too busy with other things to to ever ask what the torque setting was. 35 years of being in same room with my father while he worked on rifles and I fabricated metal. Think I had paid more attention, but hindsight is 20/20...lol

    I snugged em all up, but I guess time will tell.
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Torque measures how hard a screw is turned, not how tight it is. A given amount of torque applied to smooth, oiled threads gets a screw a lot tighter than the same amount of torque applied to a screw with dirty, rusty threads. That's why "tightening" to an arbitrary inch-pounds of torque is not particularly useful with small screws.

    I like to make the front action screw as tight as I can reasonably make it with a good-fitting screwdriver. The rear action screw should be just snug, but not "squeaky" tight. On your rifle with the two trigger guard screws, the front one is only there to hold the trigger guard in place (and offset the pull of the rear action screw). It should be approximately as snug as the rear action screw. What is probably more important than how tight they are is that they are tightened evenly at the same time so that no binding occurs.
     
  5. Webphut

    Webphut Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like I did a good job then, that is essentially what I did.

    Thank you.
     
  6. The Virginian

    The Virginian Member

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    All that said, in the benchrest .22 world, action screw torque is known to affect accuracy when shooting pin holes at 50 yards. Companies like Anschutz have recommended torque values as do many others.

    Jist sayin'...don't make me get my nail gun out!
     
  7. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    I have found that many gun owners tend to over tighten the guard/receiver screws to the point of being ridiculous. In addition to putting unnecessary pressure on the rear of the receiver they invariably booger the screw slots in their attempt to make the receiver one with the stock. Invariably, when I get one of these in, I have to be extremely careful to grind a screwdriver blade so that it fits the screw slot perfectly when I try to remove the overtightened screw. In a lot of cases the screws still deform a bit because the screw is so tight the amount of force that has to be exerted to remove them is more than the screw was designed to take.

    My rule of thumb for tightening receiver screws is not to overtighten them. Tighten the front screw until it is snug and ditto for the rear screw. Overtightening can affect accuracy adversely as can screws that are too lose. So good judgement and a feel for how not overtightening the screws is key to securing the receiver properly without overtightening the screws.

    In other words, don't tighten the screws like you shake hands macho style.

    rick
     
  8. The Virginian

    The Virginian Member

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    You are absolutely correct. Some folks should not be allowed to handle tools!
     
  9. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    I agree. And most backyard mechanics treat rifles like they were working on their cars. Tighten the screws almost to the point of wringing off the screw heads.

    rick
     

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