How Many of You Glass- or Pillar-Bed Your Sako Rifles?

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by South Pender, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    I'm wondering how many of you either glass-bed or pillar-bed (with glass as well as the pillars) your Sako rifles. I'm not thinking solely of bedding for accuracy (where you'd free-float the barrel too), but also of bedding for increased protection against stock damage arising from recoil, particularly with heavier cartridges.

     

  2. Matthew Winter

    Matthew Winter Member

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    I am by no means an expert but can’t see the value in it when these rifles are robust and often shoot .5 inch groups.

    interested to hear what others say, but I would never devalue my finnbear just to make it perhaps slightly more robust or accurate

    Matt
     
  3. Jeffy1

    Jeffy1 Active Member

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    I agree with Matthew. If I have a Sako that requires accurizing (is that a word?) it finds a new home, unless it is a rare piece, then I can live with slightly less than great performance. In recent years I don't think I've had to make that decision anyway. However, I won't hesitate to switch out the trigger if I can find an available canjar trigger to put in its place.
     
    Matthew Winter likes this.
  4. RangerAV

    RangerAV Member

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    I did one of those; can't remember details very well, since it was a number of years ago... but I have an AV in .25-'06 and the upshot is that I thought better to not hunt with the gorgeous original wood stock... so I got a MacMillan replacement and then had the action bedded into that.

    It was actually a drop-in, but I was working with Somaribba & Co. (gunsmiths) in Miami at the time to get wifey's shotgun fitted and some remedial work on a family-passed-down Browning A5... and we got to talking... and in the end I decided to have them get the AV bedding right in the MacMillan stock.

    The stock info is here: https://mcmillanusa.com/mcmillan-rifle-stocks/hunting-stocks-sako-classic/

    I was just thinking it had an aluminum bedding system or at least aluminum pillars, but their website doesn't mention that. And I may be thinking of an HS Precision stock that I used for rebedding a family-pass-down Winchester 70 in .338 WM.

    Anyway, I wasn't thinking about potential stock damage from recoil.. just didn't want to go out crawling for pronghorn again with the original stock and thought best to at least not lose any accuracy... and I figured additional bedding wouldn't hurt.

    -Chris
     
  5. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    My FN-Sako in .300 H&H is glass bedded in a custom stock. That's the way I got it, along with a Timney trigger. Bedding the action has the advantage of minimizing the danger that the drying out of the wood over time will affect the bedding. I've had to do some fine carving on a couple of older Sakos to compensate for warping or loosening caused by drying out. Just depends on the individual piece of wood. I agree that with most Sako rifles, most of the time, glass or pillar bedding is unnecessary and is unlikely to enhance accuracy significantly.
     
  6. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    I hadn't thought primarily about bedding for accuracy, but rather for preventing stock damage (like splitting of the web between the magazine and trigger cutouts or between the recoil lug and magazine) and stability under humidity changes. For the latter, I think pillar-bedding provides the best alternative, with the pillars glassed at top and bottom so that the action is never (or at least less-often) affected by movement of the wood with humidity changes.
     
  7. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Agree. This is an issue in Arizona, where it is much drier than in most of the rest of the country (not to mention Finland).
     

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