Hole in the wall Bofors

Discussion in 'Show us your Sako' started by bigcountry4me, May 30, 2021.

  1. bigcountry4me

    bigcountry4me Well-Known Member

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    Okay, so I fully realize this rifle is very far from unique or rare. As we all know L579’s in .243 are arguably and perhaps - one of the most common Sakos out there. I cannot begin to express how many I’ve passed on over the years. Especially since we have a few in the safe as it is.

    So, in my typical drive around in Western Oregon on a beautiful Saturday, I found this today in a small shop at a real bargain.


    In my opinion, and considering the current market - at $610 including the state fee, this was tough to pass on. Although not perfectly kept, the metal is just about pristine. The bore is very crisp and the bolt and face are still like new. This rifle is also very light, 5 lbs, 13 oz.

    The first photo is deceiving as it looks like the bolt is worn, but it’s glare. There are a few nicks, but nothing I can’t remedy with just a small amount of effort. It’s pretty much as it should be less the hood, fortunately I have spares. My best guess is 63-64, but as we all are aware, that’s subject to a record search.

    Yes, it is a .243 Winchester, but as we all know clean non-mucked up Sakos are drying up. And prices are on the rise, even for the common variations. Fortunately I’m blessed with a plethora of ammunition in this caliber, so having it around makes it a good gift for one of the grandkids.
     

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    Last edited: May 30, 2021

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Well, the .243's and .30-06's may be more common and less sought-after, but a Bofors Sako in pristine condition is a prize regardless of caliber. I'd have bought it, too.
     
  3. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Well-Known Member

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    My first Sako was a .243 , it started this whole thing!
    There a lot of .243’s & 30-06’s out there, but for very good reason. Any Sako in .243 pristine or beat to hell is still a good gun in respect to function. Give me a choice between a NIB savage 110 and a 70% graded Sako, you’ll be carrying the savage back home.

    Hippie
     
  4. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    You done good. Pat yourself on the back !

    DeerGoose
     
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  5. Bernie’s Dad

    Bernie’s Dad Well-Known Member

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    Wow. Great deal. Five pounds 13 oz? So light.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  6. bigcountry4me

    bigcountry4me Well-Known Member

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    Thanks I feel pretty good about it. Everything I’ve seen lately regarding Forester length rifles Bofors or not, is on the upswing. .243’s and .22-250’s typically bring $900 and up. Clean.308’s add another $500. Obviously keep going for a .244.

    As we are aware, these figures can differ based on regional and economic dynamics, as well as other factors. Paulson likes to use “ the phase of the moon”. Which is legit. The reality is a Forester length rifle is just plain versatile, no matter the region.

    I completely disassembled the rifle last night and attribute the light weight to the stock. Simply stated, and although I didn’t weigh it, this is one extremely light piece of wood. I might attribute this to age and moisture loss. After all this stick of wood is 57-58 years old. Thanks
     
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