• Hey All! Lately there has been more and more scammers on the forum board. They register and replies to members requests for guns and/or parts or other things. The reply contains a gmail or hotmail address or similar ”anonymous” email addresses which they want you to reply to. DO NOT ANSWER ANY STRANGE MESSAGES! They often state something like this: ”Hello! Saw your post about purchasing a stock for a Safari. KnuckleheadBob has one. Email him at: [email protected]” If you receive any strange messages: Check the status of whoever message you. If they have no posts and signed up the same day or very recently, stay away. Same goes for other members they might refer to. Check them too and if they are long standing members, PM them and ask if the message is legit. Most likely it’s not. Then use the report function in each message or post so I can kick them out! Beware of anything that might seem fishy! And again, for all of you who registered your personal name as username, please contact me so I can change it to a more anonymous username. You’d be surprised of how much one can find out about a person from just a username on a forum such ad our! All the best! And be safe! Jim

Hi from a new SAKO AV .30-06 Owner!

Sako Collectors Club Discussion Forum

AI- 1979, AII- 1977(very late), AIII- 1978, AIV- 1980, AV- 1981-82. I know of no way to confirm this 100% and I think the actual dates could vary by a few months, but when you're talking "what year" it's probably close enough.
Interesting !
Sako’s 1984 catalog introduces the Sako 2700 Finnsport..describing the new model as a classic European design for the American market. The line-up shows the Finnsport with the Sako Standard Sporter and a DeLux model which appears to NOT have a forward angled rosewood accent piece. IMG_3870.jpeg
I thought for a moment that the Finnsport may be the model we find with the Herringbone checkering patterns, but the photo doesn’t show clearly enough to tell.
 
The discussion is somewhat academic, but the changeover from the "L" to the "A" designation appears to have been like many of Sako's changeovers: It occurred over a period of time with plenty of "L"-marked receivers coming out of the factory contemporaneous with "A"-marked receivers. People don't generally save hang tags, but I suspect that you could find some hang tags with the "L" designation with inspection dates perhaps as late as 1980 or 1981. Regardless, unless someone is interested in something like C&R qualification, as I say, it's a somewhat academic issue.

And as Paulson has noted previously, internally Sako continued to refer to its "A"-series actions by the previous "L" series designation for many years subsequent. It was not until the "X91" series, which had a different inletting footprint, that Sako stopped using the "L" designation within the factory.
 
Sako’s 1984 catalog introduces the Sako 2700 Finnsport..describing the new model as a classic European design for the American market
Catalog "writers" and illustrators are infamously inaccurate, sometimes because they are writing prospectively about firearms that are not yet in production, and sometimes because they use old illustrations which aren't accurate for current production.

This 1984 catalog cover is a perfect example. Although the "Finnsport" was supposed to have an oil finish and the "standard" a gloss finish, the two are indistinguishable in the illustration. Likewise, Sako never dropped the contrasting fore end on the Deluxe. Old catalogs are fun to look at, but can be a source of misinformation.
 
Interesting !
Sako’s 1984 catalog introduces the Sako 2700 Finnsport..describing the new model as a classic European design for the American market. The line-up shows the Finnsport with the Sako Standard Sporter and a DeLux model which appears to NOT have a forward angled rosewood accent piece. View attachment 31713
I thought for a moment that the Finnsport may be the model we find with the Herringbone checkering patterns, but the photo doesn’t show clearly enough to tell.
All the "Herringbone" Sakos I have owned or have seen were AI's, AII's or AV's. IIRC, that checkering pattern was in the mid-1980's & was very short lived. However, I have never handled a Finnsport. Not sure what reasoning Sako had for making the "Finnsport", but it ended up being another short lived item.
 
I'm not certain if the "Finnsport 2700" was ever actually labelled and sold as such. I have owned Sako sporters from that era with matte (not actually oil-finished) stocks. Those may have been "Finnsport 2700's". Without the box or hang tag it isn't possible to say since such designation was never stamped on the rifle. Perhaps someone has a box label or hang tag for a Finnsport 2700 that they could post a photo of?

I did own a "Model 74" in 7mm Rem Mag, but I could find nothing about it that wasn't identical to the standard Finnbear of the day.
 
It would be very informative for less educated users if someone could post some pictures of the famous "two part trigger guard" on the AV series.

Those posted above I think they are of a single part trigger guard. They are not very clear though so it is difficult for a newbie to tell.

I have searched the site for pictures and did not find any but then I may not be the smartest with computers. If they are available somewhere I would appreciate a hint where to find them.
Thanks !
 
I'm not certain if the "Finnsport 2700" was ever actually labelled and sold as such. I have owned Sako sporters from that era with matte (not actually oil-finished) stocks. Those may have been "Finnsport 2700's". Without the box or hang tag it isn't possible to say since such designation was never stamped on the rifle. Perhaps someone has a box label or hang tag for a Finnsport 2700 that they could post a photo of?

I did own a "Model 74" in 7mm Rem Mag, but I could find nothing about it that wasn't identical to the standard Finnbear of the day.
 
Interesting !
Sako’s 1984 catalog introduces the Sako 2700 Finnsport..describing the new model as a classic European design for the American market. The line-up shows the Finnsport with the Sako Standard Sporter and a DeLux model which appears to NOT have a forward angled rosewood accent piece. View attachment 31713
I thought for a moment that the Finnsport may be the model we find with the Herringbone checkering patterns, but the photo doesn’t show clearly enough to tell.
Here is a pic of my Finnsport 2700 from 1983. Hope this helps.
 

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I thought for a moment that the Finnsport may be the model we find with the Herringbone checkering patterns, but the photo doesn’t show clearly enough to tell.
Jack's Finsport (unusual for Sako, they spelled it with just one "n") has the herringbone checkering pattern, so you may be correct - or, all of the A-series during a short period had the herringbone pattern. The matte-finished AV I had did have the herringbone pattern, so may well have been a "Finsport".

Curiously, Sako listed models in the shipping records back in the mid-70's as "oljytukki", meaning "oiled wood" as opposed to "lakkatukki" meaning "lacquered wood". It may be that their American marketing people simply "created" a new model by marketing the matte finished rifles as "Finsport". After all, that appears to be the only difference in the "Finsport" and the standard.
 
An observation about marketers, ad copy writers, and catalog people in general: They aren't necessarily too smart, nor does accuracy get in the way of telling a good story.

They make a big deal on the ad copy in Bloo's post about Sako now offering SIX different models: The Standard, Classic, Deluxe, Varmint, Safari, and Finsport.

If they were trying to brag on all the different models then why did they omit the Mannlicher, which would have made it SEVEN models? You might infer from this ad copy that Sako had dropped the Mannlicher, which was certainly not true.

As I've pointed out before, catalogs are advertising, and advertising doesn't always tell the truth -- or at least not the whole truth. The ad copy might have been written by someone who didn't know a gun from a stick, but was told to make it sound good.
 
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