Help with hand loading for my L461 .222

Discussion in 'Hand loading your Sako' started by Curt Bloom, Mar 29, 2020.

  1. Curt Bloom

    Curt Bloom Member

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    I am gonna do some hand loading for my .222. I’d like a heavier bullet just in case I take it hunting. I was wondering if anyone has loaded a 70 grain bullet or so for a .222 and whether the slower twist of an old L461 could stabilize it. Please share the info of your .222 hand loads. Thanks.

     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    You will need a 9 or more likely an 8 twist to stabilize a 70 grainer in a 222 Rem. The velocity will be so low it would be fairly inadequate for practical use for anything one would hunt with a 222 Rem anyway.
     
  3. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Ditto what Paulson says.

    Your Sako .222 was built to shoot 50-55 grain bullets. The 55's are heavy enough, particularly in a bullet with a reputation for holding together like the Hornady 55 grain w/cannelure, for taking the smaller deer species. For that matter, jillions of whitetails have been taken with the standard 50 grain factory load.

    It is also versatile enough to use one of the 40 grain polymer-tipped bullets for varmints at velocities of up to 3600 fps. However, the good old 50-grainers, which have long been the standard for the .222, work well for most purposes.

    There are literally dozens of powders which work well in a .222, ranging from 4198 on the faster end to perhaps BL-C2 or WW748 on the slower end. H335 and either of the 4895's are favorites of mine, but many, many other powders will work as well.

    For whatever reason, the SAAMI pressure standards for the .222 are somewhat lower than the .223. This means that the loading data you find in loading manuals and online data from powder companies or bullet manufacturers will be somewhat conservative. As with any cartridge you'll need to work up your loads according to the feedback you receive from your rifle, but it isn't uncommon for loads generating perfectly acceptable pressures to exceed those listed in manuals as "maximum".
     

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