Help Needed with New Sako 85

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by South Pender, Jan 12, 2020.

  1. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    I'm a little embarrassed to be asking this question, but, what the heck, here it is.

    With all of my bolt-action rifles, I make it a point to lubricate the cocking cam surface with a lubricant like molybdenum disulfide (or in some cases tungsten disulfide which is even more slippery) or just ordinary grease (like that sold for double-barrel shotgun hinges) to make the cocking effort on the bolt lift easier, as the cocking piece rides up against the cocking cam on the rear of the bolt body.

    I’ve found this to be a real challenge with the Sako 85 bolt. In the two pictures below, the first shows the bolt (which is cocked) with the front of the cocking piece held in a notch against the rear of the bolt body. In the second picture (again cocked), you can see a round cut-out on the side of the root of the bolt handle.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Can someone suggest how one can get at the angle that the cocking piece rides up against to get some lubricant into the relevant parts in the cocking (opening) action? As things stand, the bolt lift is very stiff, and lubrication would help with this. There doesn’t appear to be any opening to get lubricant into with the bottom of the bolt shroud covering the camming surface.

     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2020

  2. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I don't know any more about lubricants than what is on the labels of each kind. I don't know how much of all that I really believe anyhow. I have dozens of bolt action rifles and I have never taken the bolt apart to apply a lubricant to the bearing surfaces of any of the internals. When you have spring pressure applied to two different surfaces, there isn't much room for anything to stay on either surface for very long.

    My theory has always been to apply a proven lubricant, (Break Free) to those surfaces by capillary action after a good spray and working the bolt. I do shoot a lot and in all kinds of weather and never had any problems with bolts working and firing pins firing. It is my conclusion that maybe taking a bolt apart is not necessary to lubricate the internals properly. By not taking any bolts apart, I have never had to put one back together and worry about lost parts or improper fit...
     
  3. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    I'm not interested in disassembling the bolt to apply the lubricant. I've never had to do this in the past with any other bolt actions. In addition, the instructions for removing the cocking piece-striker-bolt shroud unit from the bolt body suggest turning the shroud in a clockwise direction until the cocking-piece nob slips out of the holding notch. I tried to do this, just to see whether that might expose the necessary surfaces, but am unable to turn the shroud as directed. I do have some arthritis in my hands, and this has perhaps prevented my cranking the shroud with enough force. However, one shouldn't have to disassemble the bolt to do the minor lubricating that I want to do with this action.

    Given the design of the cocking piece/shroud (in the pictures above), can anyone suggest an easier way to get lubricant to the relevant surfaces?
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2020 at 1:12 AM
  4. P04R

    P04R Well-Known Member

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    Without disassembly the only option is to use needle point to dab grease on the load bearing side of the striker. Closing the bolt with trigger pulled should let the striker ride down the cocking cam while spreading the grease little bit.

    Lubrication of the cocking cam on models 75 and 85 is crucial as the load bearing surface area is much smaller than previous generations.
     
  5. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    That makes sense, P04R. It's just that it's hard to get much grease into the very tiny sliver of space around the cocking piece (rear of the striker). I guess the stiffer bolt lift of the 75s and 85s is to some extent a function of the 70° bolt lift, as opposed to the 90° lift of the older Sako actions—as you say a shorter camming surface to compress the mainspring and cock the action.

    Edit. When I looked over the materials I got with the rifle, I noticed a plastic device referred to as a "cocking wrench." It is shaped on the inside to slip over the 85 bolt shroud and give you a grip on the shroud to move the cocking piece out of the holding notch and disassemble the bolt if desired. It's available from the Beretta USA website--labeled "Sako Cocking Wrench for 85 series"--for $18. Here's a pic:
    [​IMG]
    It works quite well, and makes disassembly super easy, although I don't plan to disassemble the bolt much at all. No real need for that, I think, unless I were to get some water into the action.

    Just to follow up a little on this, I see that Midwest Gun Works also has them, along with the same tool for the 75 series. I haven't seen this tool for the L/A series although they may exist.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2020 at 12:28 AM

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