Hello thanks for allowing me to be in this forum.

Discussion in 'New members, please introduce yourselves here!' started by couchpotato, Oct 8, 2019.

  1. couchpotato

    couchpotato Member

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    Hi i am fortunate to own a Sako and find a grouo that values quality as much as i do
    i recently purchased an a111 7mm saco stamped imported by Stoger and it has the bear on the palm swell as well as the stag on the mag well wondering what year this one is serial is 544xxx and i wonder is i overpaid. it has wood at 90% bluing is only showing silver on the crown of barrel paid 1300. thanks all

     

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  2. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    My opinion is that yes, you overpaid for it, but you obviously wanted the gun enough to pay that price. What someone pays for anything is totally subjective, unless you were a dealer, then you have little hope ever making any money on that rifle.

    We buy things we like for personal reasons and you evidently wanted that rifle, so I would tell you to scope it and go shoot something with it...
     
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  3. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Kirk may feel that $1,300 is too much money, but good luck finding one cheaper. Sometimes you can pick up a nice used Sako from an individual for less than market, but almost any retailer who stocks guns is going to ask about what you paid for that rifle -- or more.

    You can take a lot of pride in owning and shooting it.
     
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  4. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Oct 8, 2019
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  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The price is within the range I have been seeing excellent to NIB Deluxes sell for & prices do vary from region to region. So, I would say you did not over pay by much, if you bought it to keep & the 7Mag is the caliber you want to use. The 7Mag is one of the hardest to sell if you should decide to part with it in the future. Little late to worry about overpaying after you already bought it, so why not just enjoy it?
     
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  6. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Your serial number would put the date of your rifle at about the year 1980. The price of $1300 that you paid for your Deluxe model is on the higher side but not that far out of range. The 7mm mag is one of the more produced calibers that Sako made. Shoot and enjoy.
     
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  7. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Internet auction prices naturally run somewhat below stocking dealer prices for the obvious reasons that the buyer can't be absolutely certain about the condition of the piece and the seller may not stand behind it if something is found amiss. Also, shipping costs may add $40 to $50 and the fee by a receiving/transferring dealer may add another $25 to $50 to the final cost of a gun bought from an internet auction. Even then, an unreasonably high percentage of guns seem to end up damaged in shipping, which is a hassle (that often goes uncompensated), which is another reason that internet auction prices are lower. Guns, especially used ones, simply command a higher price when purchased from a stocking dealer who will stand behind the sale.

    Cherry picking a few examples, some of which have problems, from Gunbroker listings is hardly a good apples-to-apples price comparison. Without examining couchpotato's rifle more closely it's not possible to provide an accurate estimate of its fair market value, but as I said before, "almost any retailer who stocks guns is going to ask about what you paid for that rifle -- or more".

    Many of us here on the forum buy and sell Sakos with some regularity. We're always on the lookout for a bargain which can be resold, traded, or otherwise be parlayed into something to expand or improve our collections. Would I buy the rifle in question at that price for that purpose? NO, of course not since it is priced approximately retail. But if I were a non-collector and disinterested in the financial bottom line who was looking for that caliber in that grade would I pay a trusted dealer that much for it? Probably so, because I probably couldn't find the same gun at any other dealer in my immediate area.

    Not everyone is like Kirk or myself who looks at most every purchase as a profit/loss transaction.
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    By the way, it is hard to name a product that sells on the secondary/used market at nearly as high a percentage of its original price as do guns. Most of them seem to sell for 75 to 85 percent of their original price (although it varies with the type and quality of the particular gun).

    I have relatives who are in the commercial estate sale business and hold about 30 to 35 high-end estate sales a year. The demand for various items (furniture, art, silverware, china, clothing, appliances, etc.) varies tremendously. Washers and dryers tend to sell quite well and a recent set will probably bring 50% of store price. A good refrigerator is a notch below that at around 30%. Dining furniture, even nice or luxury models, is hard to move at all; and clothing goes for pennies on the dollar. But every now and then they will have some guns. Not only do buyers come out of the woodwork for even pedestrian Savages and Mossbergs, but the guns nearly always sell for their asking price and are gone in the first hour.

    Not that this directly relates to the question of just what is an accurate market price for the Sako that is the subject of this thread. But regardless of whether $1,300 is a fair price, that rifle will bring a smooth $1,000 any day of the week, even on an internet auction, if Couchpotato wants to sell it. If he had paid $1,300 for the latest in a 65" UHD TV and wanted to sell it, then he would be looking at hopefully getting a couple of hundred bucks back. If anyone would buy it.
     
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  9. couchpotato

    couchpotato Member

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    thank you so much for your imput i bought it because i came accross a pre garcia 30/06 tjat i got in excellent overbl 95% condition made in the 64 year for 800 and luckily sold it to my brother who would not sell it back to me once i figured out what big mistake i had made. i foumd this 7mm at the gun show and i stated that i paid 1300 because i traded a kimber worth 800 for the rifle that i aquired in trade for a thermal i originally paid 1300 for. At the time of trade for the kimber for the scope it would have been worth about 800. so in depreciation actuality i paid 950 for the rifle and look forward to scoping it and putting it to good use at the ranch. i foumd the serial number on ansite to be closer to 74 but either way im sure that was wrong info based on the replys. I am just happy to have found this rifle a year ago and it lasting till last satursay on his table so i could finally trade the old timer for it last weekend. i will continue to keep my eyes peeled for future Sako rifles since i have learned that the quality is about second to none in reguards to the craftsmanship and beauty . thanks to you all and i will be handing this rifle down to my son later on in life . the wood arround the triger is where the damage is due to the way the old timer displayed it on a metal rack i attached a pic. all in all i am happy and thankful for the fimd. Thanks again for the replys and warm welcome. i look forward to being a menber for the long haul. btw the old timer is a great dealer of old gums and was askimg 1300 reduced from 1800 lol he gave me the deal since i work thr gun shows making holsters and i mentioned to him that he had been toting that rifle arround for a full year.
     

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  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Not sure I followed all of the math involved with the various trades that went into this rifle, but that's typical of an extended "horse" trade involving several guns. Been there, done that, as I'm sure all of us have. Suffice it to say that your actual cost and your imputed "retail" cost in the rifle are two different things. Sounds like you enjoy the "sport" of trading guns, as well as the sport of shooting them. You'll find lots of kindred spirits here on this forum.
     
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  11. couchpotato

    couchpotato Member

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    LOL your right on stonecreek it is a blast to get nice stuff in horse trades. having this made right now a nice leather sling. what bullet weight would work best out of this rifle for shots under 400 yards for accuracy?
     

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  12. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    I was once told that it is impossible to pay "too much" for a gun, you can only pay "too soon." That is, given the passage of a bit of time, the value will catch up to what you paid. Just so long as you buy the right guns. And most older Sakos qualify as "the right guns."
     
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  13. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Each rifle, even a Sako, is a rule unto itself as to what bullets and loads it "likes" the best. I generally like bullets in the 140 to 160 grain range for the larger 7mm's. If you're only shooting at hogs and whitetails in Texas then nearly any bullet that shoots well is going to provide adequate terminal performance.
     

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