• Hey All! Lately there has been more and more scammers on the forum board. They register and replies to members requests for guns and/or parts or other things. The reply contains a gmail or hotmail address or similar ”anonymous” email addresses which they want you to reply to. DO NOT ANSWER ANY STRANGE MESSAGES! They often state something like this: ”Hello! Saw your post about purchasing a stock for a Safari. KnuckleheadBob has one. Email him at: [email protected]” If you receive any strange messages: Check the status of whoever message you. If they have no posts and signed up the same day or very recently, stay away. Same goes for other members they might refer to. Check them too and if they are long standing members, PM them and ask if the message is legit. Most likely it’s not. Then use the report function in each message or post so I can kick them out! Beware of anything that might seem fishy! And again, for all of you who registered your personal name as username, please contact me so I can change it to a more anonymous username. You’d be surprised of how much one can find out about a person from just a username on a forum such ad our! All the best! And be safe! Jim

Grendel/Sako SRT .308... The Douglas Bbl Myth

Sako Collectors Club Discussion Forum

bloorooster

Enjoys long walks and short blood trails
Hey Sako guys and girls!
Got a little story
One fine morning, as I sat with my coffee and a smoke on the can, I, of course found need to check my email, on my phone. Which took me to that auction site that we all know about. I gazed along the same ol' same stuff, smoke in my eye, same ol'..wait! There's a Grendel...308! I had seen these around and was drawn to the folding stock principle. The Grendel folks later on became the Kel-Tec folks as I understood so I felt that it was worth a try...Oh lookie a buy it Now! Before I got my pants pulled up, the gun was in the process of being mine...

I received the gun some time later and outfitted it with a scope, checked the bore, gave it a quick cleaning and went to the range. The first two rounds out of it touched each other and it was about 3 inches high and left. I smiled and went to open the bolt after that second shot and it wouldn't extract. Closed it opened it and it worked. Hmm..Next round went bang..opened the group to about an inch (probably me) and refused to exctract again except this time it was not loosening up. Took it home and had to tap the brass out with a rod. The brass at first looked fine but upon closer inspection I found a ring, pressed outward about 3/8' from the case head, very fine but raised enough to hang in the chamber. The chamber ended up having a groove all the way around it, don't know how...

I had read up on the gun and had the understanding that they were built with Douglas match grade barrels and since Douglas Barrels is practically just up the road , I fetched it all up and took it to Em! It took a phone call and I was on my way.
I walked in and introduced my self to the receptionist and she directed me thru. Walked in to an amazing place with walls lined with test targets and trophys, I showed the smith the rifle and explained the situation, at first thinking that maybe it would be a simple fix or possibly a reaming (no pun). He kinda almost gagged at the sight of my gun which I found ...odd. He quickly told me that that could not be done because of this and that. So we went on to a new barrel conversation, which I was ok with. They could of course match the taper and barrel length but they could not do the fluting, they do Not flute barrels. The next part of the conversation went like this. I asked about the Grendels being made with Douglas barrels from the factory, he said "no sir". I asked if possibly Douglas could have sold barrels to Grendel who then fabricated things from there, he said "No sir, I've been here since 197o something and I have never heard any of this". I thought "Hm"
I helped the smith get the stock apart and the receiver clear, the smith was already showing signs of contempt (LOL its not the typical 2 or 3 screws and yer free). I then left him to do whatever and walked back towards the reception area, where I ran into Mr Douglas himself, he invited me to sit down and we talked a bit. He also said that Douglas did not supply the barrel for the Grendel.


Anyways, I had them go ahead and do it, and it turned out very nice. the rifle has just a bit more forward mass but still balances nicely at the front lug. The bedding system and the way the stock is assembled is crazy but very effective. It shoots cloverleaf patterns with my handload and thats with me being half blind (well maybe not half). The folding stock is excellent for backpacking and or when you are dragging 175 lbs of venison thru 250 feet of multifloral rose!

So...from what I understand...The Grendel SRT Rifle has a Match Grade Barrel, but it is not from Douglas Barrels....except for mine!

The Old Hippie
 
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Interesting, and weird. That contradicts everything that has been published about the Grendel that I am aware of. I'll have to check the NRA website to see if they reviewed the Grendel when it was in production.

I had one of those things, and it was a real tack driver. Cloverleaf groups were typical. This is the first time I've heard of a problem with a chamber on a Grendel barrel.

Does yours have the bipod? I don't know if all the Grendels had bipods, but the spigot under the barrel is for a clamp-on bipod. Most of the ones I've seen for sale over the past few years have been missing the bipod.

While the Grendel seems to fit the modern "tacticool" idiom, contemporary articles indicate it was intended as a mountain hunting rifle that would fit inside a backpack for the hike in to remote locations. I'm not sure I believe that, given its appearance, the extra-large magazine, and the muzzle device, but that's what the mavens said at the time.

Here's an original Grendel in .308, with fluted barrel and bipod, folded and unfolded. Scope is a 6x Zeiss Diatal-C in Sako rings.
Grendel2.jpg Grendel4.jpg
 
Thanks Icebear for your reply and photos!
Mine did not come with original bipod..it did have a Harris that was poorly installed and a bit hefty for my taste. I removed it and stored it with my weaver aluminum scope bases and crushed beer cans.

Out of all the Sako rifles I have owned, I’ve had only 2 that did not function properly. The Grendel was the first and the L46 left wing .222 that is currently on subject here. I was surprised but I did know in my mind that eventually it was going to happen. Hopefully the L46 will be repaired soon so I can follow thru on its origins.

My info on the Grendel SRT is that they were developed to appeal to the law enforcement market as a sniper rifle (tho most trained snipers would probably giggle a bit). There were only around 500 produced in all. I , like you, felt that folding stock and short barrel length would serve perfectly to the mountains and hills of West Virginia, and it has been my “go to” when season comes in with rain and snow and weather not fit for my Deluxes or other wood stocked sweeties! The trigger is perfect just like Sako intended, the bolt is slick as usual and the extra capacity mag (9 rounds down) lets me carry plenty “follow up shots”.

Yeah..it’s ugly.. but it is a highly functional rifle!

The old hippie
 
Mine did not come with original bipod..it did have a Harris that was poorly installed and a bit hefty for my taste. I removed it and stored it with my weaver aluminum scope bases and crushed beer cans.
I have such a storage place where I also keep my yellow filter flip up lens protectors and see-through scope mounts.

I have a friend who owned a Grendel. I was never kicked so hard by a .308. It seemed to kick even out of proportion to its weight as I've had lighter .308's seem to impart less violence to my shoulder. But when watching intently to see whether that whitetail runs or falls the kick would be a non-issue.
 
I have such a storage place where I also keep my yellow filter flip up lens protectors and see-through scope mounts
I have a friend who owned a Grendel. I was never kicked so hard by a .308. It seemed to kick even out of proportion to its weight as I've had lighter .308's seem to impart less violence to my shoulder. But when watching intently to see whether that whitetail runs or falls the kick would be a non-issue.
 
Lol!
I remember in my youth, trying to make use of those yellow plastic scope covers!
“They could work great for low light situations “
Like looking thru a bottle of Mountain Dew... I still find them here and there when I filter thru junk drawers trying to find something else of greater importance!

the old hippie
 
462633AF-B7A8-4526-92F9-434CE0351F91.jpeg This Coyote came thru the wrong holler one morning during Deer season a couple years back. I think he was trying to disguise himself as a fraidy cat.
 
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“They could work great for low light situations “
That's not what yellow filters are for. A yellow filter is for fairly bright, but flat lighting conditions for instance with a high overcast. It can be hard to pick out a target under such conditions; the yellow filter enhances contrast. A lot of ski goggles are yellow, and that's why. I take three pair of goggles with me to the ski hill, orange, yellow, and dark pink. I choose a pair according to the conditions on the hill that day.
 
Update:
I recently came across an interview on Guns and Ammo with George Kellgren where he stated that the barrels used on the SRT were indeed from Douglas and the total manufactured was around 1000.
I have no idea why the folks at Douglas refused to verify any connections with Grendel or Kellgren

I still have the old fluted barrel but it will need some work to use.

Edit: name correction..oops
 
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Agree with SC about felt recoil and passed on a trade after range session. Hey Icebear, does that blanket come with a car underneath?
 
Can't remember the last time I saw one on the road. Looks like your's gets out and about. Must gather a few eyeballs and head turnings when that turbo spools up! Like the Fuchs color matching wheels and unadulterated condition. There is no substitute.
 
Must gather a few eyeballs and head turnings when that turbo spools up!
A couple of months ago I was refueling and a kid came up to me, all excited, and asked me about the car. And took pictures with his phone. As for the turbo spooling up, that's a great thing about the Autothority chipset. It has two chips - the usual one for timing, FI, rev limiter, etc. and the other controls the turbo. Instead of letting the turbo idle, it keeps it spooled up to just below the point where it's producing power. So, when you hit the throttle, turbo lag is near zero. Makes a big difference in drivability. The chips also improve the torque curve - way more torque between 2000 and 4000 rpm. Overall, the chipset upgrades the 2.5 liter engine from 215 bhp to somewhere between 250 and 265. Car weight is under 3000# so that makes a substantial difference. It's fun to drive on smooth pavement, but the Konis make it ride like an ox-wagon if the road isn't so good. I've had it since I came back from Finland in 1993.
 

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