FN Mauser Sako 300 H&H Mag

Discussion in 'Sako Mausers, Hi-Powers and Magnum Mausers' started by Sako157, Oct 14, 2013.

  1. Sako157

    Sako157 Member

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    Hello,
    I have what I believe is an early FN Sako Mauser long action 300 H&H Magnum (serial number 111XXX) that was given to me as a gift from my father several years ago.
    The rifle was purchased with a ratty stock that is not the original stock. Does anybody have advice on where I can purchase a nice stock for under $300.00? Everywhere I have looked so far does not sell a stock for Sako 300 H&H Magnum. Any help is greatly appreciated.

     

  2. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    57- That ratty old stock happen to have a recoil cross bolt? The same stock for a 30-06 or .270 will work. I have one but it would need a cross bolt installed because it is for a .308 Cartridge size in regard to recoil. The stock will fit your action and metal.-Misako
     
  3. emmerth

    emmerth Well-Known Member

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    misako, did Sako make a 308 in the FN action? Also, would a L61r or L579 stock work with the FN action? I dont have any of the FN action guns to compare them. Thanks-emmerth
     
  4. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    E- I don't know if Sako did because I can't lay my hands on the specs. I am sure that FN did. They used the commercially modified Mauser 98. Chamberings and barrel channel fit would be the factors involved with getting a stock to "fit" l57s rifle. I think a crossbolt would need to be added so the tang area can be kept from cracking. Bottom metal on FNs is much different than Sako l61s so it would be a PIA to try to make one work. An old Browning High Power stock would also work on his FN. So would JC Higgens and a bunch of Stock Makers stocks that are available for replacement. I don't know what the market is for those since Sako keeps me busy enough to satisfy my interest in guns and such.:humble:-Misako
     
  5. Sako157

    Sako157 Member

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    Thank you 50!
     
  6. L61R

    L61R SCC President Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    emmerth, they never listed them in 308 but did they make them? Don't think so buy wouldn't bet on it.

    They were listed in 270, 30-06, 8x57mauser, 8x60, 300H&H and 375H&H. I once saw one in 9,3x62 with all the right markings so there are probably other calibers out there too. I have heard rumuors of a few in 7x64 but I don't know if they exist.

    I also know of a Sako Mauser or Hi Power as they were listed in the US, in caliber 8x57Mauser. That would a great find.

    So as always one has to separate the listed models and calibers from special orders and such. Back in the day you could order almost anything if you had the dough and time to wait.

    Jim
     
  7. emmerth

    emmerth Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys...you learn something new everyday!
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Just a note on the Sako-Mausers: The 8x60 was listed, and is what is stamped on the rifles so chambered, however, the information I've received is that the Sako-Mausers were actually 8x60s. The difference is that the 8x60 supposedly has the "J" (infantry) .318" groove diameter of the original 7.92x57 Mauser before it was changed to the "S" bore ("spitzer") measuring .323". Since the 8x60 actually came along between WW-I and WW-II (it was "invented" to avoid breaking the WW-I treaty which prohibited Germany from producing military calibers, ie., the 7.92x57/8x57), it was post-adoption of the "S" bore, so maybe it simply went by "8x60" instead of always using the designation "8x60s". At any rate, I was a little bit hesitant to buy any of the very few 8x60 Sako-Mausers I've come across due to the non-"S" designation, fearing that the bore (groove diameter) would be the oddball .318". But apparently this is not the case and the Sako-Mausers use a .323" bullet.

    If any one has different information I'd be appreciative of hearing it.
     
  9. L-46

    L-46 Well-Known Member

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    The 8x60 was made with both 's' and 'j' bores, i have owned two which had the 'j' bore,
    without knowing for sure i imagine the 'j' bore was only sold on the domestic market, one of my rifles was brought over from Sweden, the other i did not know its origin.
    I can only assume most were made in the 's' bore. i had been told they only made a handful in the 'j' bore but i saw that unlikely as i have seen two in my time.
    Both rifles had no caliber designation, apart from 8x60 but was only apparent by measuring the bore diameter. They were both early rifles one was 103xxx and the other 104xxx
    L-46
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Thanks for that enlightenment, L-46! Great to have info coming from an actual owner, which is another great thing about this site.

    So it seems that my information was half-right: The designation on the rifle is plain "8x60" without the "s", regardless of whether the groove diameter is .318" or .323". This creates a difficulty in shopping for one (particularly remotely via website) since most sellers have no clue about what the actual bore size is and are unaware that "8mm's" came in two slightly different bore sizes.

    FWIW: If the chamber's neck will accept the .323" bullet, then it is typically safe to fire most .323" bullets in .318" bores when chambered in a modern turnbolt like the Mauser. Surprisingly little additional pressure is generated from "bore swaging" a .005" oversized conventional cup and lead core bullet down upon firing, and I'm told that reasonable accuracy usually results. The same may NOT be true of monometal (all copper) bullets or steel-jacketed bullets like some military fmj's.

    Perhaps you've had occasion to gain some experience with these "oversized" bullets in a "J" bore? If so, please further enlighten us.
     
  11. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    I'm inferring from your numbers that the Sako-Mausers may have started numbering at 100,000?
     
  12. L61R

    L61R SCC President Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Stonecreek you are absolutely right. They started at 100000 and the serial numbers are on the barrels on the left side.

    Jim
     
  13. Karelian

    Karelian Member

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    I am late to this thread but I have an FN-long action SAKO in 8x60 and it is definitely an "I", not an "S". I have slugged the bore and made a Cerrosafe cast of the chamber. 200 grain PSP .318" bullets are readily available from Buffalo Arms Company in Ponderay, Idaho, U.S.A. Woodleigh in Australia also catalogs .318" bullets. The rifle has a rather heavy 60 cm barrel, open rear sight with one folding leaf, military style flip over safety on cocking piece. The oil-finished stock is rather figured, light weight with a schnable-tipped fore end and fixed sling rings. The action is not drilled. The rifle weighs 7 3/4 pounds and recoil is stout with heavily loaded 200 grain bullets. I have not tried the Magnum Bombe loads as once advertised by RWS.
     

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