Short Actions First L46 chambered in .222 Rem. I wonder when?

Discussion in 'Sako Short Actions' started by Old Hippie, May 7, 2021.

  1. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Icebear that is very , very nice! Gorgeous wood character and squiggles!
    The wing safety is so perfect in its placement and seemingly effective..I wonder what reason Sako felt to change it so soon. The right side rolling safety block design was used in both the later 46’s and the new (at the time) L57’s . Then with the introduction of the L61R all three action sizes went to the slimmer cocking piece and right side Remington type safety..along with other changes in floor plate designs..

    I love Sako’s ..it never ends!

    old hippie

     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Actually, Sako went to the #4 trigger with it's integral safety with the L579 in 1959. When the L461 & L61R came out in 1961 they shared the same bolt & trigger design as the L579. Never heard anyone say that Sako had a Remington type safety before. If having a safety that blocks the trigger instead of the firing pin is called a "Remington" type safety, that's news to me. I don't look at the #4 trigger as an improvement, as I prefer a safety that blocks the firing pin instead of just the trigger. The Win Model 70 style trigger of the older Sakos was also simpler, easy to adjust, visual, and easy to clean. I guess it's just a matter of personal preference.
     
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  3. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Yes sir, you are right ! I completely skipped over L579’s in the time line. (I knew that once back in the day)
    The Remington safety comment came mostly in reference to location and physical operation, not so much the mechanical aspect.
    I’ve listened for hours to gun guys going over the technical pros and cons between the different safety types, and respectfully saying, it makes sense in many ways..but all I really worried about was its location and if it’s on safe or fire.
    Are the early wing safety 46’s less safe? I can see were maybe it could be easily bumped down into the fire position but that’s a possibility with almost all types. Being physically and mentally aware of its position was always my thing.

    Old hippie
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    The debate over "bolt" safeties (which lock the firing pin) and trigger safeties (which lock the trigger) will go on forever as each type has its benefits and weaknesses.

    I happen to prefer the trigger safety because it is silent and usually easier to operate without disturbing the gun. But the bolt safety, which actually takes over from the sear in holding back the firing pin, is arguably the more positive. However, I've found examples of both, which when maladjusted, can cause the gun to fire when pushed from "safe" to "fire". As Old Hippie notes, the human operator is a much greater factor in safety than is the machine.
     
  5. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Hello all!
    Good News! I got my old L46 back home today! She’s running like she should now with no extraction issues. The extractor was impacted with 70 years of crud and brass. The Gunsmith also found some oxidation at the neck of the chamber which he was able to polish up. Headspace is good. He said to run some rounds thru it , see how it was gonna do.

    356649C0-3FE1-4A5A-9904-FE37153AF83F.jpeg 68ADABD7-6943-4F3F-BFF3-1063561CA601.jpeg 816BA73E-AA54-4F34-98D7-5D19A9FFFAA3.jpeg A2151492-8B93-4C61-8FE6-0D1C6AE47C9E.jpeg
    so I did!
    Shooting 50 gr factory PPU
    Pic 2 is at 50yds , 5 rounds , two first, windage adj. three more.
    Pics 3&4 100yds , first volly high. Elevation adj, second volly happy!
    Pic 4 is the last 4 rounds I had with me , 2 shots same hole next to bull
    I love 70 year old Sako’s!

    The old Hippie
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2021
  6. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    I love the smell of Shooters Choice in the morning!

    Update:
    I recently upgraded my gun cleaning supplies, new brushes, new jags, new rods….figured 45 years was long enough service time for my Outers gun cleaning kit my father gave me.
    While swabbing out Lefty, my Ol’ 46 , .222 rem, I noticed how well the ball bearing handle allowed the the brush and patches to follow the grooves, I pulled a measurement of twist rate. One full turn came up to 15 1/4” . Not terribly far from the standard 14”.
    So far with factory PPU 50g soft points it’s shooting 1/2” - 3/4” groups @ 100yrds.
    Do they make a specialized chamber cleaning brush? caliber specific? I have used large caliber bore brushes in the past , but I’ve never been comfortable with it, when it comes to the neck/shoulder/throat area of the chamber. What do the pros use?

    Hippie
     
  7. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Yes. I have nylon chamber brushes with flexible handles for .223 and .308. I believe they came from Hoppe's. As you might guess from the calibers, they are aimed at the military semiauto market, but the two of them cover most of my bolt guns.
     
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  8. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    Nay......sir.......!!

    If you don't occasionally have an open bottle of "old" Hoppe's #9 in your gun room........or soaked gun rags of it..........you DON'T have a gun room!

    Some say it makes for a nice aftershave splash-on. But then "some" may be a bit sensitive to the nitrobenzene!!! :) :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2021
  9. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I haven't used Hoppe's #9 since I found out the hard way that it takes the finish off of some all0y-framed guns (specifically, a Colt Cobra). To quote the Raven: Nevermore!
     
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  10. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    Yep......

    If memory serves, nickle-plated cylinder faces didn't respond very well......if left "on" for too long. The same for Wipe-Away treated cloth.......except it works great for carbon rings on stainless steel.
     
  11. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    I used Hoppe’s almost all my life (loved that smell too!) until I found Shooters Choice back in the 90’s , it seemed to be more effective on copper fouling and less harsh on certain finishes.
    I have some #9 around here too, somewhere!

    Hip
     
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  12. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I used to use Shooters Choice quite a bit, but I found Sweet's 7.62 to be more effective on copper. I don't love the smell of Sweet's; it stinks to high heaven of ammonia. But then a fellow Forum member (sorry, I can't remember who or I'd give him a shout-out) put me on to Eliminator. That stuff really works on everything, including the decades of hardened crud in the barrels of old military rifles. It doesn't smell good but it's not a WWI gas attack like Sweet's. The stuff is so powerful on copper that you have to use a nylon brush with it - it will eat away a bronze brush. It's also good for neutralizing corrosive primer residue, which Hoppe's and Shooters Choice are not.
     
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  13. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    Hip.....

    Don't get me wrong.....as much as I like the smell of old Hoppes, I've long ago moved on(even if I still use a little bit of it for cleaning off old parts.....i.e. old soaked gun rags/t-shirts).

    Back in the 80's I discovered the original Marksman's Choice and Sweets 7.62. Heck....I even sold a few cases of both at gun shows.....those were the days.
    Since the early 90's I've mixed 2 parts Marksmans/Shooters with 1 part Kroil, as an everyday bore cleaner. The mix has served me pretty well.

    Then there's all the more "modern" cleaners.....and most of them do their job well.
     
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  14. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Kroil … I have used the aerosol can in the construction trade for years, never did it occur to me that it could be used in combination with other solvents as a bore cleaner. I like the idea! I’m guessing it can be purchased in a non aerosol form?

    Ammonia vapors are the worst! :confused: Not a fan!

    Hippie
     
  15. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Sure, you can get it in cans of various sizes. Try the corner hardware store. I use it all the time for hard-to-turn screws and also to leave in the bore of dirty old military rifles to loosen hardened crud and prevent rust.
     
  16. Unclekax

    Unclekax Well-Known Member

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    Bore Tech Eliminator has been a favorite of mine for years.
    Just do not let it get on the stock/finish as it will take the finish off the stock.
    Yes it will dissolve your bronze and copper brushes. Best to use nylon brushes on graphite cleaning rods.
     
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2021
  17. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Benchrest shooters have been using Kroil in combination with J-B's Bore Cleaner for over 5 decades. I think they know how to clean barrels. About all I use. Safe for the wood finish as well. The aerosol cans are new to the game, squirt bottle is all you need.
     
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  18. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Graphite is great stuff, but I think my old stainless steel ball-bearing rods will hold up to any solvent short of hydrofluoric acid. The other thing required for Eliminator is plated or non-brass jags or loops. The chemical will attack a brass jag and turn the patch green even if there's no copper in the barrel.

    I seem to recall you were the one who turned me on to Eliminator. If so, thanks.
     
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  19. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    I got graphite rods and bronze brushes and brass jags from Tipton. I don’t have a bore guide, using my hand like guiding a pool cue. It may be deemed improper to do so , as some would have it, but it works ok for me.
    Green patches don’t show up much , or at least not of recent times. Black to grey to white is what I get.
    Using straight shooters choice, soaking the bore generously for 20 minutes or so? Is this because I’m keeping the bore clean or because I’m not soaking long enough?
     
  20. Unclekax

    Unclekax Well-Known Member

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    I am a fan of the bore guide not only to keep the brush aligned in the bore but to keep the solvent away from the stock.
    Pretty cheap insurance.
    Try some BTE in one of your clean guns and be prepared for a surprise.
    Green patches and tighter groups.
     

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