Early Sako stock woods

Discussion in 'Sako Mannlichers and Carbines' started by robinpeck, Nov 20, 2018.

  1. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    Here are three early Sakos from my own collection. After careful examination I have concluded that (from the top) the stock woods are Walnut, Beech and (heavily stained or dyed) Birch. I may attempt some better outdoor photography when it stops snowing.

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    Last edited: Nov 23, 2018

  2. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the top and bottom guns, but I have my doubts about the gun in the middle being beech. It lacks the distinctive scalloped cross-grain pattern characteristic of beech. See the photo below of a Swedish Mauser with a beech stock. I think it's more likely that the middle gun is light-colored French walnut. I have a similar L46 that I believe to be French walnut - see the bottom two photos.

    CG 6.JPG

    3 Rifles.JPG L46-1.JPG
     
    deergoose likes this.
  3. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    I tend to agree with Icebear. Determining the type wood can be difficult, but Robinpeck's middle rifle and Icebear's Mauser and L46 have one thing in common. They are quartersawn, especially the mauser, it looks like it was cut from the sweet spot. The other rifles are flatsawn. They're all attractive to me.
     
  4. robinpeck

    robinpeck Well-Known Member

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    I had the same suspicions about the middle rifle (the L46) but I finally came down on the side of Beech precisely BECAUSE of the "distinctive scalloped cross-grain pattern characteristic of beech." That grain characteristic is there in places but I will have to take better photos in order for you to see it. I know what Beech looks like from many decades spent buying and selling Swedish Mausers. Of course, I may be wrong and in some ways I hope I am. It might be a light walnut.

    And of course, I agree with the statement, "They're all attractive to me."
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2018

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