early L46 odd looking stock

Discussion in 'Sako Short Actions' started by mlesh, Jan 10, 2019.

  1. mlesh

    mlesh Member

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    2019-01-10_14-12-07.jpg 2019-01-10_14-12-58.jpg

     
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  2. mlesh

    mlesh Member

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    Has anyone seen a factory stock like this one??? thanks mike
     
  3. mlesh

    mlesh Member

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  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    It is a factory stock which has been customized with an inlay and fore end tip. Now considered a degradation, such "customizations" were popular in the 1950's and 1960's, probably influenced by the contemporaneous prestige of the Weatherby line with its decorative stock features. Also, that was a period in which thousands of amateur gunsmiths were "sporterizing" Mausers and Springfields and everyone thought that an inlay, grip cap, or fore end tip made for an upgraded stock.
     
  5. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Although it does have a negative effect on the collectible value of the rifle, I think it looks rather nice. It's conservative, which most of the embellishments of the era were not. The forend tip looks like the builder cut off the original forend tip, inserted a white spacer, and put the original wood back on it. I've seen some real horror shows of "custom" guns from the Weatherby era, but that one, IMHO, is in good taste. At least it's the original classic-style stock and not some monstrosity with an oversize Monte Carlo cheekpiece and all kinds of weird sculpturing, of which I see plenty of examples. I wouldn't do that stock work myself, but I wouldn't reject a good rifle because of it either.
     
  6. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I agree!!! Tastefully done embellishments to a classic stock design.
     
  7. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    Agreed, looks nice.

    I wouldn't kick it out of my collection
     
  8. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    While inlays like the above were mostly popular in the U.S., they were also done in Europe. A Swedish custom gun builder named Folke Dahlberg was known for inlaid stocks, and the diamond shown in the photos below was kind of a signature of his. Note that unlike the inlay on the Sako above, it is symmetrical only on one axis, not two. The rifle in the photo is unsigned, but is almost certainly by Folke Dahlberg. It is a model 96 Swedish military Mauser with target sights, as used in the FSB (a Swedish marksmanship club affiliated with the military). This is the only military target rifle I have seen or heard of with a Dalhberg stock. Most of his work was done for Husqvarna on civilian Mauser actions.

    I probably paid too much for this rifle, but I found it intriguing. It shoots quite well, but the cheekpiece is so high it makes it hard to get down on the iron sights. If you look closely you can see that the cheekpiece is dished to allow the shooter to get a bit lower. The stock would actually work better with a scope, but I don't want to mess around with the gun. The recoil pad is not original; it appears to have been added by a later owner in the U.S. The installation is sloppy, unlike the stock itself. You can see where it was sanded to size in place without protecting the stock wood. It escapes me why anyone would think a recoil pad is necessary on a 6.5x55, especially on a big heavy gun like this one. Felt recoil is, shall we say, minimal. The pad has no effect; it has long since hardened. I do intend to replace the pad when I get time.

    Custom Target 1.JPG Custom Target 2.JPG Custom Target3.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
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  9. mlesh

    mlesh Member

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    Thanks everyone for you help and thoughts on the gun. Unfortunately the price of the gun was a little higher than I wanted to pay ($1180). The serial number of the gun was 8599, and I found it was listed and sold on gunauction July 2 2017 for $653.oo. https://www.gunauction.com/buy/14464355/ by the same person selling it on gunbroker. It appears the listing is very similar. I also used the factory records service and have the ledger page for this rifle if anyone could use it. Thanks again mike
     

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