Dummies' Guide to Trigger Adjustment

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by stephenhubchen, Jul 22, 2010.

  1. stephenhubchen

    stephenhubchen Active Member

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    I have an L579 on which I would like to lighten the trigger a bit, something I have never done on any rifle. I downloaded a copy of the manual. Regarding the trigger, all it says is:



    Trigger pull is preset at factory to approx. 2 kg weight. Trigger pull can be adjusted from screw B. However, this must never be less than 1.5 kg as even the weight of trigger might cause the rifle to fire if gun is knocked against hard surface. Backlash can be adjusted from screw E. To dismount trigger mechanism, open lock nut D, loosen screw C and take the mechanism out.



    Included is a decent diagram of the trigger assembly

    [​IMG]



    The only relevant text is "Trigger pull can be adjusted from screw B." So my questions are:



    • All you have to do is turn screw B to lighten the trigger?
    • What is "backlash," screw E for? Do I need to mess with that too?
    • What is "A" for in the diagram?
    Just want a better idea of what I need to do before I dive in.



    Thanks,

     

  2. nmoncada

    nmoncada Member

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    Thats to funny I was looking at that diagram earlier today and wanted a better explanation!
    -Nick
     
  3. stephenhubchen

    stephenhubchen Active Member

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    What, no one can give a better explanation than "Trigger pull can be adjusted from screw B"? C'mon, this dummy needs a little more to work with.:wink2:
     
  4. scottbitterman

    scottbitterman Well-Known Member

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    Steve
    Give it a chance our medium action experts might not have been on line since you posted this.
    altough it is a good question i would like to know for my 243.
    Scott
     
  5. tslans

    tslans Well-Known Member

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    Maybe this will help. It is from the M74 Super manual.

    Tslans
     

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  6. tslans

    tslans Well-Known Member

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    I didn't realize that it would be so difficult to read. Sorry tslans
     

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  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Sako-addicted

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    tlans,
    Everything looks good. For us without laser vision all we have to do is click once on the upload and it opens into another page, and there is further magnification there, too.
    No problem. Thanks for posting.
    S-A
     
  8. stephenhubchen

    stephenhubchen Active Member

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    tlans, that does help a lot. What about backlash?
    Thanks again,
     
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Adjust the weight of pull as the instructions outline, however, be aware that the lower end is limited. At some point the firing pin sear will slip over the trigger sear when you ram the bolt home. You will need to slam the bolt enthusiastically a number of times, push the safety on and off, and even bump the butt of the gun against a carpeted floor to assure that the sear engagement is adequate. If the firing pin fails to catch, you must turn the adjusting screw back in (clockwise) until everything is secure.

    The "backlash" or overtravel screw keeps there from being excessive slack in the trigger when it is cocked (and after firing). By turning it inward (clockwise) you may reduce the slack in the trigger. But the same caution applies: If you turn it too far, the sear will fail to catch rendering your trigger disfunctional.
     
  10. tslans

    tslans Well-Known Member

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    Steve,

    I hope you have a trigger pull gauge. I use the RCBS gauge. I try to keep trigger pull on my hunting rifles around 3 pounds - absolutely no lower than 2.75 pounds. 2 kg is about 4.4 pounds, 1.5 kg is about 3.3 pounds. I like a crisp trigger because of the all the hours I've spent on the range with target rifles and pistols.

    Backlash is the amount the trigger travels after the sear releases ie: overtravel. I adjust my triggers so there is no creep and no backlash/overtravel. I find little creep in Sako triggers.

    Make sure the rifle is empty!!! Use a snap cap if you have one, or a least an empty case case with a fired primer. Adjust screw "E" in about 1/8 of a turn at a time until the sear doesn't release. Then back off 1/8 of a turn at until it releases. Check and double check that it releases reliably.

    I hunt deer with an L61R adjusted this way. I don't even have to think about pulling the trigger. It just seems to fire when I have the correct sight picture. I had to work to get a crisp trigger on it. I lightly stoned and polished the sear and trigger to get it smooth and crisp. I wouldn't recommend that you try stoning unless you are very comfortable doing this type of work. Leave it to an experienced gunsmith.

    tslans
     
  11. stephenhubchen

    stephenhubchen Active Member

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    tslans, thanks again for the advice. I only have a few rifles/guns and the Sako is the only one that has an "easily" adjustable trigger, so I do not have a lot of extra job specific tools, such as a trigger pull gauge. I do have snap caps though. I may just try a miniscule change at a time and see if I like the improvement.

    Steve
     
  12. tslans

    tslans Well-Known Member

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    Steve,

    I do not agree that trial and error is a safe way to adjust a trigger. Before you try to adjust the trigger carefully clean it and lightly lubricate it with a quality gun oil. That might be enough to improve its feel. Brownells sells the RCBS Premium trgger pull gauge for $42.99. That is what I currently use. It is probably less than what you would have to spend to have a gunsmith correct the weight of the pull if you make a mistake.

    If you wish to try the only thing that I can suggest is that you keep can accurate log of the every change you make. Then you will be able to at least get back close to the factory settings. Please follow stonecreek's advise and vigorously try to get the firing pin to accidentally release.

    A light trigger pull is risky on a hunting rifle. You might miss the trophy of a lifetime because of an accidental discharge. Worst yet an accidental discharge can have deadly consequences to something other than a game animal. You need to consider how you hunt. Do you hunt in cold weather? Do you wear gloves? Do you practice at the range in your hunting clothes and with glove hands? That last thing you want to happen is to have your rifle discharge when you insert a gloved finger in the trigger guard.

    tslans
     
  13. stephenhubchen

    stephenhubchen Active Member

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    tslans, thanks again for your advice which I will definitely heed and proceed cautiously.
     

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