differences between a 75 and the current 85's

Discussion in 'Sako 75, 85 and A7' started by Tracy Redpath, Dec 3, 2020.

  1. Tracy Redpath

    Tracy Redpath Active Member

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    i just picked up a 85 Bavarian Carbine on Saturday and today at my LGS I saw a NIB Sako Deluxe 75 in .30-06. At least i think it was a Deluxe as the floorplate was engraved. My question is what are some of the differences between a 75 and an 85. It was decently priced

     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2020

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Not much. The 85 magazine "locks" in by some manner that makes it less likely to fall out & claims to have "controlled round" feeding. It's actually not a true controlled round feed, but is kinda, sorta, after the round is almost all the way in the chamber, so I call it a half controlled round feed. Oh! I almost forgot. All the 75's actually eject the cartridge/brass when you pull the bolt back. Others may know of more differences & hopefully chime in.
     
  3. Tracy Redpath

    Tracy Redpath Active Member

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    Excuse my ignorance on the subject but Is the model 75 another name for the A111 or AV
     
  4. bigcountry4me

    bigcountry4me Well-Known Member

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    The 75 is a complete departure from the AIII and the AV. The AIII and the AV were models with “improvements” to the L61R. The three are typical regarding standard style recoil lugs. The 75 is radically different in design, including the bolt. The current 85 has similar features to the 75 with some “improvements”. Take a look online at 75 and 85 action photos and you’ll see the stark contrast. Hope this helps.
     
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  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The 75 came out in 1996, the 75th Anniversary of SAKO. The 85 in 2006, the 85th. The L series model numbers reflected the year they came out in some fashion. Not sure what the A was all about. The 91 series went back to the year thing. 2021 will be the 100th Anniversary, so I expect there will be some kind of anniversary offering or newly named model forthcoming from the marketers at Beretta.
     
  6. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Specifically, the 75 and 85 use a three-lug bolt with 60° lift, as opposed to the traditional two-lug bolt with a 90° lift. All other things being equal, a three-lug bolt is smoother and faster in operation than one with two lugs. I don't have a 75/85 Sako, but I do have a Steyr SSG-69 with 60° lift and it is super fast and slick. Early Sako L61R bolts are referred to as "three-lug" bolts, but they are 90°, two-lug bolts with an additional "safety lug" in the rear.
     
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  7. ROOSTER

    ROOSTER Member

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    I know the 75 and the 85 mags are different for sure. I have a 75 and bought 85 mags! Hahahahahahah
     
  8. Bernie’s Dad

    Bernie’s Dad Well-Known Member

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    Even a Mauser bolt doesn’t control the cartridge until it well up the ramp. I have a Zastava and the round doesn’t slip up under the claw until about 3/4 of the way forward. IMHO the whole controlled feed thing is a bit overstated. I think Mr Mauser was mostly worried about extraction not feeding.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  9. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    You are correct! The entire purpose of "controlled round feeding", which the militaries insisted on, was to prevent a soldier in the confusion & panic of combat from pulling the bolt back before the round was fully chambered, then jamming the next round from the magazine into the round that was partially chambered & rendering his weapon useless. By having the extractor engage the cartridge rim on it's way out of the magazine, if a soldier prematurely pulled back on the bolt, any live round that was not fully chambered would eject from the action & allow the next round to chamber without interference. I have witnessed a Marine remove & replace 4 fully charged magazines for his weapon without firing a shot when under "duress"! So, controlled round feeding was the military's way of mitigating this same behavior with a bolt action rifle. There is no evidence that a controlled round bolt head "feeds" any better than a push feed. In fact, many knowledgeable rifle enthusiasts feel the push feed bolt is less likely to have "feeding" problems, because it is simpler. Controlled round feeding was marketed on dangerous game rifles for the same reasons, but it's true purpose & function have been misconstrued over time. People that have been in harm's way fully understand & appreciate controlled round feeding's military origins, but for sport hunting it really matters little, if at all..
     
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  10. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    All true. But there's still nothing like an African big game rifle built on a Brevex or Oberndorf double square bridge Magnum action. Not that I'd turn up my nose at a Sako Safari, but there's something about the old-time stopping rifles. At the last big Phoenix show before the pandemic, I saw a fantastic custom .416 on a Brevex action. Beautiful English walnut, fine-line checkering, leather covered pad, four-leaf express sights - it was a rapturous sight to behold. And absurdly cheap for what it was. I don't recall the price exactly, but I think it was around two grand. I'd have bought it in a heartbeat if it had been a .375, but what am I going to do with a .416 except hang it over the mantle? The chances I'll ever go back to Africa are very small, and it wouldn't be much fun as a range toy. Oh well, a guy can dream...
     
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  11. RifleNutPPC

    RifleNutPPC Well-Known Member

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    I have a HB 22PPC model 75, bolt operation is as smooth as butter.
     
  12. James Leeper

    James Leeper Member

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    I have a 75 in .338 Winn M and it is smooth. One must make sure the magazine is securely latched or it will fall out. I have more Winchester than Sako rifles but still love the Sakos.
    Have a great day.
    Jim
     

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