Deluxe 222 Auction Result

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by Rocky, Feb 28, 2021.

  1. marlin92

    marlin92 Well-Known Member

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    If they have set screws ensure to remove them or at least loosen them so they no longer contact the top of the action scope bases. then take either a hardwood block or large brass punch, place it on the very front on the scope ring base just above the guns intergral base, take a hammer and give the hardwood block or punch a hard/sharp whack driving the ring off toward the rear. You may want to take a heavy cloth or towel and place it over the stock to protect it from being impacted by the rings when they pop off.

     
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  2. Charles Witt

    Charles Witt Well-Known Member

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    What type of hammer?
     
  3. Furdown

    Furdown Well-Known Member

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    It’s not a bad idea to take the barreled action out of the stock first
     
  4. bigcountry4me

    bigcountry4me Well-Known Member

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    Invest in a quality “dead blow” hammer to strike a hard wood block. A 1 to 2 pounder is really handy. With a dead blow you have much more control when striking.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2021
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  5. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Please stop! You don't need a dead blow hammer and you don't need to remove the barreled action from the stock. To remove the mounts, first remove the scope and rings. Then completely remove the set screws. Don't just loosen them, remove them completely. You will need a wooden dowel, a rawhide hammer and a piece of an old bath towel large enough to wrap over the rear of the receiver. Remove the bolt. Wrap the towel around the receiver and over the rear tang and stock area. put the end of the dowel on the front side of the rear mount and give it a whack with the rawhide hammer. The mount should pop off. If it doesn't whack it until it does. Repeat if necessary. Now do the same with the front mount. Remember to drive the thing toward the rear of the receiver. This is the foolproof way to remove the dang things without damaging the dovetails or the mounts. The mounts can be reused but remember to toss the setscrews. Just tap them gently onto the dovetails. Only minimum force is needed as they will stay in place without any further banging.

    Hope this helps.

    rick
     
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  6. bigcountry4me

    bigcountry4me Well-Known Member

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    Respectfully, there is no issue with a small dead blow. They are soft and forgiving. They do not bounce. They are very versatile for many tasks. Have had the same one for 25 years. I think maybe you’ve confused a small dead blow with something different.

    Your way is fine too, no argument. There’s more than one acceptable way to accomplish removing stuck on bases on Sako dovetails. I personally don’t like rawhide for this task but I respect the fact that you do.

    A dead blow hammer is a specialized mallet helpful in minimizing damage to the struck surface and in controlling striking force, with minimal rebound from the struck surface. The minimal rebound is helpful in avoiding accidental damage to precision work, especially in tight locations.

    Dead blow hammer
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2021
  7. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    To each his own.

    rick
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    I use a small block of oak wood (cut from a piece of oak 1 x 3 lumber) and a plastic or rubber mallet. Same tools both on and off. But any of the above work.

    Just DON'T ever use those friggin set screws. Some will put a tiny piece of lead shot underneath them to keep them from scarring the dovetails, but I prefer to simply see the open holes where the set screws would have been to assure that nothing is interfering with the dovetail mating. A sure way to screw up a Sako scope mount is to depend on the set screws to hold the base somewhere short of where it comes to rest when tapped fully forward on the dovetail.
     
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  9. CHAUCER

    CHAUCER Active Member

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    I like the options one has with the Redfield Sako bases, but a long time ago I saw that the set screws were terrible. I tried using a small piece of lead under the screws, but I quickly decided that the screws had to go. But the remaining holes in the bases were, I thought, unsightly. So, for the last 40 years or so, I have degreased the screws, put a dab of epoxy on the threads, screwed them into the bases until they were tight and aligned., and (if they extended through the base) ground them flush on the bottom of the base with a Dremel grinding wheel. Touch up with cold blue. I think the bases look better.
     
  10. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    You can also replace the set screws with brass ones. Brass is softer than steel so it will not mar the steel. When you back out the set screw and remove the base there will be a smear of brass, but it comes off easily. I have used brass set screws on the old one-piece Stith mounts and it works well. As Stonecreek says, set screws should never be used to hold a base in place to the rear of where it naturally sits. If I'm using a slide-on base like a Stith or Conetrol (or a Redfield, but I don't use those at all), I always give it a few taps with a plastic-faced hammer to be sure it's all the way forward.
     
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  11. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    AHH, No set screws what so ever. They simply are not needed so lets stop making excuses to use them. Some screws are brass plated. Many of our members tend to over tighten screws regardless of the application.

    rick
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2021
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  12. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    Set screws or no.......drive bases on......drive bases off........fit bases......etc....

    We've been through this how many times???

    Wow..........we need a "how to" section. :)

    Maybe.....Jim??
     
  13. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    Holly Crap!!

    I haven't checked this thread out for a while. A plain jane 222 deluxe sold for North of $2600.00??? Plain Nuts!!!!
     
  14. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Too rigid and prescriptive for me. "My way is the only way" is not an appealing philosophy. There's more than one way to skin a cat. The old one-piece bases like Stith and Kuharsky may not be a perfect fit to both dovetails, so a non-marring set screw can be useful.
    So what? Most of us know how to use a magnet.
    It's kind of hard to over-tighten a brass screw. Depending on the type and size, you'll either bugger the head or strip the threads.

    You want to see a screwed-up Sako dovetail? This mess was created by somebody who didn't trust the tapered dovetail to keep the rings in place. The rings and dovetails were drilled for aligning pins (replacing the one that was already present on the rear ring). The holes aren't even centered. The rifle is an Atkinson & Marquart custom, but the damage was obviously done after the gun left A&M. I've ground off the offending pins and the rings stay in place just fine. The damage is concealed by the rings. If I decide to keep the gun, I'll put Conetrol mounts on it; if not, I'll install Redfield mounts and disclose the issue to the buyer.
    Scope Base.JPG scope rings.JPG
     
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  15. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I agree! The Sako dovetail scope mounting system is probably the most misunderstood feature not just of Sako, but of rifles in general. We are constantly being asked the same question by new members, so a "sticky" explaining things that they could read or be referred to would be a useful thread. As icebear said, there is more than oneway to skin a cat & several mounting systems are available, so maybe a thread that members could post their particular method or preference would work.
     
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  16. cl_leg

    cl_leg Well-Known Member

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    this thread went of the rails!
     
  17. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    I agree. It would be good to have two "stickies," one describing the various mounting systems and another devoted to the original Sako rings. Here's a link to a thread on tools and methods to install the traditional Sako rings without buggering the screw slots.
    https://sakocollectors.com/forum/threads/sako-scope-ring-tips-use-the-proper-tools.13883/
     
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