Cracked / Broken Stocks

Discussion in 'Members Projects' started by model 52, Aug 4, 2018.

  1. model 52

    model 52 Member

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    I am a old dude, 75 years. I have been on and reading gun forums basically since they appeared on the (new then) WWW. In all those years, I have not seen many posts of cracked stocks, nor people wanting to buy a new OEM stock because there stock either cracked or broke in half at the grip.
    Even the guys on the Winchester Collectors forum, don’t seem to mention cracked stocks on very old rifles.

    Since on the Sako Collector forum, I read of many Sako Stocks cracked or broken at the grip.


    This begs the wonder, why does it appear on such a high quality firearm as Sako, do so many stocks
    crack or break?

    Model 52
     

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    They most often break during shipping. The #1 culprit is shipping with the bolt in the action. The bolt knob provides a pivot or fulcrum point when pressure is applied to the rifle from "handling" during shipment causing failure at the weakest point, the grip area. Packing the bolt & the rifle separately in the same box helps lessen the risk, greatly. The #2 culprit is shipping thru UPS. Shipping with the bolt in the action along with using UPS is a recipe for disaster!! Sako stocks aren't any weaker or more susceptible to breaking than any other stocks.
     
  3. Jeffy1

    Jeffy1 Member

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    Could not agree more with paulson. I like hardcase for shipment. I have even shipped empty boxes to people With gun socks inside. 1 gun sock is for the bolt another for the rifle they don't have to do anything except put it back as instructed in the hard case and inside the brown cardboard box I provide and ship it USPS Priority. This has been my best experience
     
  4. marlin92

    marlin92 Well-Known Member

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    Paulson makes a good point about having the bolt in the gun., and about UPS. I myself have fallen victim to UPS and had 2 SAKO Finnwolf stocks broken at the wrist. I still have the stocks in my possession thinking someday I may try to repair them or have them repaired. I had contacted a gentleman that does it for a living and sent him multiple pictures of each and he felt they could both be repaired with no issue or susceptibility to failure after repair.
    I have since begun requesting the shipper of any firearm I purchase to please use USPS and or FEDEX and have not had an issue, probably just dumb luck. I had actually asked the seller to purchase a case to ship the second damaged Finnwolf in and I would pay for it but he felt it was too much of a bother so he just packed with bubble wrap and cardboard box. When it arrived at my FFL - I swear there was a clear footprint on the box right in the area where the wrist of the gun would have been during shipment. I can't prove it but suspect it was no accident just a ticked off worker, or someone who doesn't think firearms should be owned by private citizens. Obviously you can't mark the package as containing a firearm but not rocket science to figure out what might be in a box going to a gun shop.
     
  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Double plus on what Paulson and Marlin92 have to say about UPS. Not only does UPS destroy more stocks than any other shipper, their insurance is worthless. They routinely deny claims as the shipper's fault that the item was not packaged correctly. UPS rates are also generally higher for a gun-sized box than the other shippers.

    As to why more Sakos with cracked stocks than Winchesters, I think it has nothing to do with the wood in either. It seems rather that most Winchesters are traded at shows and through shops where the buyer takes possession, while a higher proportion of Sakos are traded through the web where the item must be shipped. This differential in the way the two are traded is reflective of the relative length of time that each has been the subject of collectors/acquirers. Winchester enthusiasts are more "old school" while Sako guys tend to be more adapted to later technology.
     

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