Cracked .308 Forester stock

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by Guest, Jul 22, 2008.

  1. Guest

    Guest Banned

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    While trying some new handloads in my Forester yesterday, I noticed a distinct crack in the stock just behind the tang. The crack showed clearly at the top and the bottom of the pistol grip. During disassembly, I found the crack was also in the wood under the trigger guard (between the floorplate and trigger--not in the area of the crossbolt). When I took the barreled action out of the stock, the crack tightened down to a hairline, hardly noticable.
    I had the action screws torqued to 40 in/lbs. This rifle has a tight chamber, but I am confident the the loads were not excessive. The rifle dates between '66 and '68, but has seen almost no use. I am going to discuss repair options with my gunsmith, but am curious to see if anyone has ideas about I have a Bell and Carlson glass stock to use and plenty of other rifles, but this one is a real peach. Thanks for any inputs.

     

  2. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    Pilot- I can only tell you what I've experienced with Sako stocks. Several people have brought in cracked stocks and asked if I could repair them. About 3 of these over the years were Sakos. I found that they had not reassemble them correctly and fired them in that condition. If the stock was the original for the rifle, I would guess it had swelled from humidity - if reassembly was not the culprit. If it wasn't original it may have had a tight inletting job that didn't get along with your barreled action. The barrel lug needs to make primary contact on recoil with the lug well. Sounds like your stock made contact in the tang and interior trigger inletting first--- cracking the stock. You may also have done everything right and the old wood may have just given up. My gut feeling is the humidity scenario.- Best- Mike
     
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  3. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    Pilot- One important thing I didn't cover--- Were you using a manufactured rest while shooting? Your shoulder has a lot more give that many of the rests. It is then a question of physics if the gun is absorbing too much recoil. I messed up a forester stock with one just a year ago. I don't use them anymore.- Mike
     
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  4. Guest

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    Mike,
    I can't be certain that the stock is original, but I have no reason to doubt it. I have had the action out of the stock and am pretty sure I put it back together correctly. I do not use a machine rest, so it was just the rifle versus my shoulder. With the accuracy I was getting, I would never have suspected the lug was not solidly bedded to the the wood. It has been very humid here, so that theory could work.
    I doubt I could get a photo of the crack with out some prying to expose it. With out seeing it, any thoughts on glass bedding the action as a repair? Thanks for the info.
    Rog
     
  5. misako50

    misako50 Sako-addicted

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    Rog- You need to spread the crack or cracks and glue, then clamp and leave for three days Then you need to bed the lug and a few inches of the barrel channel. Get the best glue available and try not to get it on the "finnish". Sometimes it can' t be helped. A little bedding behind the tang and you should be set to fire it again. If you are in a humid clime, store the guns in a cool dry place or invest in a dehumidifier if storing in a basement. Wood needs some humidity but try to keep them around 35% or a bit less. The mag well area needs to be addressed also. You mentioned a crossbolt, so a plan to bed and keep the function of it will be a bit more difficult. Never had a recracked stock that was properly bedded. Photos aren't necessary and try not to spread the crack too much. Just enough to allow the glue to penetrate.- This is a two man job at times. One thing I do with all of my sakos-- Take them apart and seal all of the raw wood when I get them. Keeps warpage and cracking, due to humidity change, away. Accuracy is also maintained and I don't have to put up with cracked stocks or rust problems.- Good luck with the project.- Mike
     
  6. Guest

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    Thanks, Mike. I just got back into town. Not sure when I will get to the job, but I will let you know how it turns out.
    Rog
     
  7. lord frith

    lord frith Active Member

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    And...did Rog get back with us for outcome? No. Why not? These posts of wailing and gnashing do absolutely nothing without denouement.
    Stephen
     
  8. Charles Witt

    Charles Witt Active Member

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    What do you seal the wood with, and where? Thank you!
     
  9. CVCOBRA1

    CVCOBRA1 Well-Known Member

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    Did you realize that thread was twelve years old? Dead a long time ago.
     

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