Cow Elk with Sako

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by stonecreek, Sep 16, 2020.

  1. Paul7

    Paul7 Well-Known Member

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    I live in NM and agree on Oryx being better than elk, moose or venison. The photo below is one I got on one of Ted Turner's ranches here with a Sako 1968 Finnbear .30-'06. Cool experience, 350,000 acres and I was the only one hunting on it that day. Oryx are much tougher than elk, on their home turf they kill African lions, and my guide in NM said Oryx have been seen with dead mountain lions on their backs/horns. The story goes in Africa lions attack Oryx from the front in the throat area, in North America mountain lions attack on the back and so are an easy target by simply throwing the horns back.

    Speaking of African animals, I've heard warthog is great, anyone have experience?

    Have taken two cow elk with my Sako Finnlight 6.5x55, after reading the OP I think I'll take my .30-'06 to an upcoming NM cow elk hunt. :(
     

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    Last edited: Oct 8, 2020

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    None recovered. All appear to have been complete pass-throughs, which is not surprising since the shots were just aft of the shoulder through the ribcage and traversed directly through the thorax without hitting bone or heavy muscle, mostly just lung.
     
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  3. sakojim

    sakojim Well-Known Member

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    Good luck on your cow hunt Paul. I have for years enjoyed the elk meat. I prefer barren cow elk meat nearly as well as prime beef which I raise. I always try to select a barren cow as the meat is definitely better and does not leave a young orphan fawn to survive the winter. My favorite smoked sausage recipe is equal portions of beef, elk and lean pork using Hi Mountain sausage kits from Riverton, WY. Super good fare.
    Not ever been inclined to do African hunts, but I have a big interest in their antelope species. Always wished that I could purchase and raise some Mountain Bongos. They are described as being very shy but gentle and easy to raise in captivity. They are declared as endangered species now.
    Let us know how the hunt goes. I have always wanted to hunt that reservation area but getting too old now. Sakojim.
     
  4. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    An excellent practice. In Finland, it's the law. The Finnish game authority issues licenses not only for adult moose, but for calves. You cannot shoot a moose with a calf. If you have a calf tag, you can shoot the calf, and once the calf is dead, you or whoever in your party has a cow tag can shoot the adult female. Sounds harsh, but it is part of traditional Finnish game management that has kept a healthy moose population in Finland for many years.
     
  5. Paul7

    Paul7 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, agreed on shooting a dry cow. Will post photos. Am going to the Lodge at Chama, NM, not exactly roughing it and about my speed at my age for difficulty. Nice to shoot one and then hand everything over to the guide. :rolleyes:

    The one below is from Vermejo Ranch about five years ago, taken with my Finnlight 6.5x55, 156 gr. factory round. You can see the bullet hole on the shoulder, the insides were mush. 071.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2020
  6. Paul7

    Paul7 Well-Known Member

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    Makes perfect sense, but I'm sure would generate protests over here, unfortunately.
     
  7. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    It's hard to know whether a cow has a calf or not unless she is alone with it. It happens that the one my son killed recently was not lactating, so we're looking forward to some excellent table fare.
     
  8. Paul7

    Paul7 Well-Known Member

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    Would the 'udders' for lack of a better term be visible while glassing?
     
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    It would take better eyes and steadier nerves than mine, along with a very patient elk, to determine on the hoof whether she was lactating. Besides, the lactating cow elk I've seen killed appeared no different from a non-lactating one until the field dressing process revealed the presence or absence of milk. They don't show a bag like a fresh Holstein, you know.
     
  10. sakojim

    sakojim Well-Known Member

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    Very true Stone. I would have to admit that this may be a little off topic in this discussion but I would like to provide the following info in the best interest of helping less experienced and younger hunters. (Maybe even change some thoughts about hunting.) These facts may not apply to all areas of elk hunting, but here goes. I once was on a stand in an area of about 200 acres of freshly downed timber that I knew was drawing a herd of elk. Being in the middle of this area at early light, I was amazed as a herd of about 150 elk moved in and surrounded me. No wind, cold morning and they did not wind me because of the strong smell of the timber. I was so fascinated that i sat very still and learned a big lesson. The beautiful sounds that the herd made while communicating between the cows and their calves was an experience that I will never forget. Each cow was always keeping watch where her calf was by sounds similar to birds chirping and other different sounds. I saw that two cows were acting differently, such as not paying attention nearly so much to the other animals, just browsing. I sat there for about an hour hoping for a bull to help me fill my tag but no luck so I casually moved out and the herd immediately spooked. What I learned eventually changed my elk hunting habits. I would guess that patience and close attention to the actions of cows will show you that barren cows are less attentive to others in the herd and are usually bigger, older, fatter and much better for quality meat. I would guess that most of the barren cows are past their breeding prime. I always say that hunting regulations are determined by the misinformed. Hunters usually kill the biggest and best herd bulls for horns to brag about. Herd bulls are usually in poor shape late in the rut. Just consider this fact- if farmers sold only their best herd bulls for meat, we would all be eating low-grade hamburger from dairy cattle. Killing the prime herd bulls of any species will eventually decrease the size and quality of the animals. In my area of Oregon the deer and elk are more prevalent in or near towns and agriculture land than in the National Forest areas because of hunting pressure. The animals also seem to have adapted by decreasing in size. Just my thoughts for what they are worth. Just remember that at one time the elk were a Great Plains animal like the Buffalo. They were pushed into the mountains by the settlement of our country. Over population of our country and hunting pressure is now endangering some species whether we want to admit it or not. Sakojim.
     
  11. icebear

    icebear Sako-addicted

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    Brilliant!!! Thanks for posting this.
     
  12. Rogan Kinnear

    Rogan Kinnear Well-Known Member

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    Fantastic story. Thanks for sharing! I have always preferred to take an animal that has already contributed back to it's population many times. Some species of animal, such as one crayfish or what you would call a lobster, produce phenomenal amounts of eggs as they age so we leave the bigger ones alone. For me it depends on what I am hunting. I always hunt for food so would leave a poor animal even if it was the biggest and oldest.
     

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