Coltsman L579

Discussion in 'Other firearms built on Sako actions' started by Guest, Feb 12, 2005.

  1. Guest

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    Have become very interested in Sako rifles. Everyone was so helpful with my first question here that I thought I would have another. Have the opportunity to purchase a Coltsman L579 .308 for $450. Barrel and action in excellent shape with original peep and front sight hood. Stock has several pellet sized dings but in otherwise good shape. How common is this rifle and is it very collectible? Is that a good price? Thanks in advance for the help.

     

  2. Guest

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    The rifle was a bargain, especially with the peep included. The Sako/Coltsman is somewhat collectible, and should shoot as well as any other Sako. I don't know why you mention replacing the stock - it's worth more with the original, and you say the original is in decent shape. As for the lack of a Bofors mark, that may or may not be significant. Not all old Sakos bear the Bofors mark. Some were made of Bofors steel and lacked the mark, and some were made of Finnish steel, which is actually better. If the barrel has the usual Finnish proof marks, it's original. If I saw it, I could probably tell you for sure from the type face on the caliber marking, but that obviously is not an option unless you live in Tucson.
     
  3. Guest

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    Rifle was ser# 40XXX. Idea on date? From an earlier post, I saw that they only manufactured between 58 and 66. Production of 10,000. I do not believe that barrel is Sako. Has a mark that looks like a "C" with a backwards "K" and a small forward "b" inside which is stamped on the barrel just forward of the receiver. No other marks on barrel other than the Coltsman/Colt PTFA/.308 stamp on top. Has a Sako front sight with hood. Rear sight is flip up type. Stock turned out to be in fair condition. Dings were actually rubs. Appears to have been a gun rack kept gun for at least part of its life. Looks much better after applying Glorifying Antique (very good product for improving the looks of older wood pieces). ONLY marks on blue are on end of barrel and sight hood where it seems someone leaned it against a wall/gun cabinet. Barrel is exactly 21" from front of receiver. Fairly confused over which mounts/rings to purchase so I took a shot with the Burris mounts and signature rings for a Leupold scope. Won't be out too much on mounts and rings if I don't like them. Any opinions on Burris? Intend on keeping rifle original with exception of rings/mounts/scope. Will be putting the peep away for safe keeping as these seem to be quite sought after.
     
  4. Guest

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    I love the burris signature rings. I have them on my 220 swift and my Black powder rife. Most of the guys in my neck of the woods have switched to Burris. The plastic/teflon whatever they are inserts make boresighting a snap and protect the scope tube. I have also converted many of my hunting rifles from leupold to the burris fullfield II 4-14 with the balistic plex reticle. My 3 deer stands on the "back eighty" are 550 yards apart. The balistic plex allows me to take the 300-400 yard shot with total confidence....takes all the guesswork out of long range shots. Regards, Rick.
     
  5. Guest

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    I think it is a sako barrel found this
    Answer:
    Mark- I think you might have a real rarity in Colt firearms. Except for the AR-15/M16 series, Colt rifles in the 20th Century were a financial disaster and never caught on. The Colt "57" Bolt action rifle was introduced in 1957, made on a FN Mauser action, and offered in .30-06 and .243 calibers. These were all assembled by Jefferson Manufacturing Company in North Haven, CT. These were offered in both a standard and deluxe grade, but neither was engraved. About 5,000 of these were made.
     
  6. Guest

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    Also, according to proofhouse.com, all of the 10000 rifles made were "manufactured and serial numbered by Sako". The L57 version, up to 59, were made by the outfit in carolina and numbered 1-5000. What's interesting to me is could your old coltsman have L57 parts? If it does, you may have found the rare of the rare!!!! How about posting some pics....or look at my old 308 and see if you can find any similarities. Regards, Rick.
     
  7. Guest

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    Rick,

    Excellent info on the Colt. Pictures are up but, I'm not that great of a photographer. Doesn't appear to have any of the L57 characteristics you show in your photo library. Just a straight L579. From your information, I would place this rifle in the earlier Colts as the later ones began to use different stocks and checkering. Does the 40XXX fall in line with '62/'63? Glad to hear that the barrel is also Sako even though it has no Finnish marks. Appears that I have a fairly rare Sako rifle. Guess that trip to the local pawn shop was worth it.......lol.
     
  8. Guest

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    After I bought my first set of burris signiture rings with the inserts I
    replaced all my rings with them. No lapping no torqued scope tubes no ring
    marks and they grip like the devil.
     
  9. Guest

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    I looked at your pics....IMHO, you are the proud owner of a sako L579 pure and simple. I have heard that Sako did not put the bofors stamp on the rifles they made for colt.....hey, sometimes they forgot the stamp....a mute point as these older ones were hand made. Deergoose may disagree but bofors was just a marketing gimick....all their barrels came from the same steel. As for the SN.......shoot, Sako couldn't keep their own records straight so the 40 number could mean any number of things.....the batch of 1964 rifles??....40 denoting 308's???....you may never find out.....does it matter????....no. A "real" Sako in your rifle's condition...probably 600 range. Because it's a colt, I'd guess 700-800....because it's rare. How many 308's were made???? probably less than a thousand. You have a terrific rifle...can't wait to find out how she shoots. Expect some tight groups...many of these old 308's were one hole guns. Great find and congrats. Regards, Rick.
     
  10. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    sounds good, Rick. I've seen the Bofors stamping on some late Riihimaki guns as well as some of the Mauser actioned rifles of the mid to late '50s. The real reputation maker for Sako was the small action Riihimaki guns of the early to mid '50s, and even late '40s in calibers like the Hornet and .222. icebear has eluded to the fact that these guns had Finnish steel, I think I've read somewhere that the steel was called "Lokomo" steel. A question that I've been trying to answer for some time is at what point did Sako migrate to Bofors from the Finnish steel, or at least, as you say, start stamping the guns Bofors for their marketing ploy.

    Back to the original topic, L579 .308 in any variation, Sako or not, is a fine firearm, so enjoy !

    DeerGoose
     

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